Results for 'Helmut Hauser'

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  1.  50
    Ordinary Devices: Reply to Bringsjord's Clarifying the Logic of Anti-Computationalism: Reply to Hauser[REVIEW]Larry Hauser - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (1):115-117.
    What Robots Can and Can't Be (hereinafter Robots) is, as Selmer Bringsjord says "intended to be a collection of formal-arguments-that-border-on-proofs for the proposition that in all worlds, at all times, machines can't be minds" (Bringsjord, forthcoming). In his (1994) "Précis of What Robots Can and Can't Be" Bringsjord styles certain of these arguments as proceeding "repeatedly . . . through instantiations of" the "simple schema".
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  2.  11
    Marshall M. Weinberg Conference: The Future of Cognitive Science - Friday Morning (Oct. 17, 2008) Session: Marc Hauser and Zenon Pylyshyn. [REVIEW]Marc Hauser & Zenon Pylyshyn - unknown
    Six leading experts speak about the future of cognitive science.
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  3.  2
    Ordinary Devices: Reply to Bringsjord's `Clarifying the Logic of Anti-Computationalism: Reply to Hauser'1.Larry Hauser - 2004 - Minds and Machines 10 (1):115-117.
  4. Natural Language and Thought: Doing Without Mentalese.Larry Hauser - 1995 - Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):41-47.
    Hauser defends the proposition that our languages of thought are public languages. One group of arguments points to the coincidence of clearly productive (novel, unbounded) cognitive competence with overt possession of recursive symbol systems. Another group relies on phenomenological experience. A third group cites practical and methodological considerations: Occam's razor and the "streetlight principle" (other things being equal, look under the lamp) that motivate looking for instantiations of outer languages in thought first.
     
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  5.  87
    Chinese Room Argument.Larry Hauser - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Chinese room argument is a thought experiment of John Searle (1980a) and associated (1984) derivation. It is one of the best known and widely credited counters to claims of artificial intelligence (AI)—that is, to claims that computers do or at least can (someday might) think. According to Searle’s original presentation, the argument is based on two key claims: brains cause minds and syntax doesn’t suffice for semantics. Its target is what Searle dubs “strong AI.” According to strong AI, Searle (...)
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  6. Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong.Marc Hauser - 2006 - Harper Collins.
    Marc Hauser puts forth the theory that humans have evolved a universal moral instinct, unconsciously propelling us to deliver judgments of right and wrong independent of gender, education, and religion. Combining his cutting-edge research with the latest findings in cognitive psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, economics, and anthropology, Hauser explores the startling implications of his provocative theory vis-à-vis contemporary bioethics, religion, the law, and our everyday lives.
     
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  7. Evolutionary and Developmental Foundations of Human Knowledge.Marc D. Hauser & Elizabeth Spelke - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press.
    What are the brain and cognitive systems that allow humans to play baseball, compute square roots, cook soufflés, or navigate the Tokyo subways? It may seem that studies of human infants and of non-human animals will tell us little about these abilities, because only educated, enculturated human adults engage in organized games, formal mathematics, gourmet cooking, or map-reading. In this chapter, we argue against this seemingly sensible conclusion. When human adults exhibit complex, uniquely human, culture-specific skills, they draw on a (...)
     
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  8. Reviving Rawls's Linguistic Analogy: Operative Principles and the Causal Structure of Moral Actions.Marc D. Hauser, Liane Young & Fiery Cushman - 2007 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 2. MIT Press.
    The thesis we develop in this essay is that all humans are endowed with a moral faculty. The moral faculty enables us to produce moral judgments on the basis of the causes and consequences of actions. As an empirical research program, we follow the framework of modern linguistics.1 The spirit of the argument dates back at least to the economist Adam Smith (1759/1976) who argued for something akin to a moral grammar, and more recently, to the political philosopher John Rawls (...)
     
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  9.  6
    Projective Uniformization Revisited.Kai Hauser & Ralf-Dieter Schindler - 2000 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 103 (1-3):109-153.
    We give an optimal lower bound in terms of large cardinal axioms for the logical strength of projective uniformization in conjuction with other regularity properties of projective sets of real numbers, namely Lebesgue measurability and its dual in the sense of category . Our proof uses a projective computation of the real numbers which code inital segments of a core model and answers a question in Hauser.
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  10.  21
    Acting, Intending, and Artificial Intelligence.L. Hauser - 1994 - Behavior and Philosophy 22 (1):22-28.
    Hauser considers John Searle's attempt to distinguish acts from movements. On Searle's account, the difference between me raising my arm and my arm's just going up (e.g., if you forcibly raise it), is the causal involvement of my intention to raise my arm in the former, but not the latter, case. Yet, we distinguish a similar difference between a robot's raising its arm and its robot arm just going up (e.g., if you manually raise it). Either robots are rightly (...)
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  11.  27
    Doing Without Mentalese.Larry Hauser - 1995 - Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):42-47.
    Hauser defends the proposition that public languages are our languages of thought. One argument for this proposition is coincidence of productive (i.e., novel, unbounded) cognitive competence with overt possession of recursive symbol systems. Another is phenomenological experience. A third is Occam's razor and the "streetlight principle.".
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  12.  17
    Action Minus Movement: Wittgenstein's Question.Larry Hauser - 1994 - Behavior and Philosophy 22 (1):23-28.
    In connection with John Searle's denial that computers genuinely act, Hauser considers Searle's attempt to distinguish full-blooded acts of agents from mere physical movements on the basis of intent. The difference between me raising my arm and my arm's just going up, on Searle's account, is the causal involvement of my intention to raise my arm in the former, but not the latter, case. Yet, we distinguish a similar difference between a robot's raising its arm and its robot arm (...)
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  13.  6
    Propositional Actitudes: Reply to Gunderson.Larry Hauser - 1994 - Behavior and Philosophy 22 (1):35-40.
    Hauser replies that performances in question provide prima facie warrant for attributions of mental properties that appeals to consciousness are empirically too vexed and theoretically too ill connected to override.
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  14.  4
    The "l'Art Pour l'Art" Problem.Arnold Hauser & Kenneth Northcott - 1979 - Critical Inquiry 5 (3):425-440.
    EDITORIAL NOTE.—Arnold Hauser died in February 1978 shortly after returning to his native Hungary; he had lived nearly half of his 85 years in a kind of self-imposed exile. He is considered, by those who know his work, to be perhaps the greatest sociologist of art, though his last years were spent in comparative neglect and obscurity. We present here as a testament to the importance of both the critic and the discipline he helped shape a section from the (...)
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  15. Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape.Gerard A. Hauser (ed.) - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _Philosophy and Rhetoric, _one of Penn State Press’s longest-running journals, was conceived at a time of immense philosophical upheaval: rhetoric as a field of study—first dismissed by Descartes—was being reexamined after decades of neglect. Now, nearly forty years later, _Philosophy and Rhetoric _continues to hold pride of place in this reinvigorated discipline. The brainchild of Penn State professors Carroll Arnold and Henry Johnstone, _Philosophy and Rhetoric_ boasts work from dozens of international luminaries from a broad spectrum of specializations. To commemorate (...)
     
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  16. The Role of Conscious Reasoning and Intuition in Moral Judgment.Fiery Cushman, Liane Young & Marc Hauser - 2006 - Psychological Science 17 (12):1082-1089.
    ��Is moral judgment accomplished by intuition or conscious reasoning? An answer demands a detailed account of the moral principles in question. We investigated three principles that guide moral judgments: (a) Harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by omission, (b) harm intended as the means to a goal is worse than harm foreseen as the side effect of a goal, and (c) harm involving physical contact with the victim is worse than harm involving no physical contact. Asking whether (...)
     
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  17. A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications.Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, J. I. N. Kang-Xing & John Mikhail - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (1):1–21.
    To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals' responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: (1) patterns of moral (...)
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  18. The Neural Basis of the Interaction Between Theory of Mind and Moral Judgment.Liane Young, Fiery Cushman, Marc Hauser & and Rebecca Saxe - 2007 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104 (20):8235-8240.
    Is the basis of criminality an act that causes harm, or an act undertaken with the belief that one will cause harm? The present study takes a cognitive neuroscience approach to investigating how information about an agent’s beliefs and an action’s conse- quences contribute to moral judgment. We build on prior devel- opmental evidence showing that these factors contribute differ- entially to the young child’s moral judgments coupled with neurobiological evidence suggesting a role for the right tem- poroparietal junction (RTPJ) (...)
     
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  19.  67
    Mayan Morality: An Exploration of Permissible Harms.Linda Abarbanell & Marc D. Hauser - 2010 - Cognition 115 (2):207-224.
    Anthropologists have provided rich field descriptions of the norms and conventions governing behavior and interactions in small-scale societies. Here, we add a further dimension to this work by presenting hypothetical moral dilemmas involving harm, to a small-scale, agrarian Mayan population, with the specific goal of exploring the hypothesis that certain moral principles apply universally. We presented Mayan participants with moral dilemmas translated into their native language, Tseltal. Paralleling several studies carried out with educated subjects living in large-scale, developed nations, the (...)
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  20.  48
    The Evolution of the Language Faculty: Clarifications and Implications.W. T. Fitch, Marc D. Hauser & Noam Chomsky - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):179-210.
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  21.  9
    Segmentation of the Speech Stream in a Non-Human Primate: Statistical Learning in Cotton-Top Tamarins.Marc D. Hauser, Elissa L. Newport & Richard N. Aslin - 2001 - Cognition 78 (3):B53-B64.
  22. The Linguistic Analogy: Motivations, Results, and Speculations.Susan Dwyer, Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):486-510.
    Inspired by the success of generative linguistics and transformational grammar, proponents of the linguistic analogy (LA) in moral psychology hypothesize that careful attention to folk-moral judgments is likely to reveal a small set of implicit rules and structures responsible for the ubiquitous and apparently unbounded capacity for making moral judgments. As a theoretical hypothesis, LA thus requires a rich description of the computational structures that underlie mature moral judgments, an account of the acquisition and development of these structures, and an (...)
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  23. Evolving the Psychological Mechanisms for Cooperation.Jeffrey R. Stevens & Marc D. Hauser - unknown
    ■ Abstract Cooperation is common across nonhuman animal taxa, from the hunting of large game in lions to the harvesting of building materials in ants. Theorists have proposed a number of models to explain the evolution of cooperative behavior. These ultimate explanations, however, rarely consider the proximate constraints on the implementation of cooperative behavior. Here we review several types of cooperation and propose a suite of cognitive abilities required for each type to evolve. We propose that several types of cooperation, (...)
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  24.  58
    Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Compute Addition Operations Over Large Numbers.Jonathan I. Flombaum, Justin A. Junge & Marc D. Hauser - 2005 - Cognition 97 (3):315-325.
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  25.  37
    How the Source, Inevitability and Means of Bringing About Harm Interact in Folk-Moral Judgments.Bryce Huebner, Marc D. Hauser & Phillip Pettit - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (2):210-233.
    Means-based harms are frequently seen as forbidden, even when they lead to a greater good. But, are there mitigating factors? Results from five experiments show that judgments about means-based harms are modulated by: 1) Pareto considerations (was the harmed person made worse off?), 2) the directness of physical contact, and 3) the source of the threat (e.g. mechanical, human, or natural). Pareto harms are more permissible than non-Pareto harms, Pareto harms requiring direct physical contact are less permissible than those that (...)
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  26.  20
    It's All in the Hands of the Beholder: New Data on Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys.Marc Hauser, Susan Perry, Joseph H. Manson, Helen Ball, Michael Williams, Erik Pearson & John Berard - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):342-344.
  27.  28
    Are Consonant Intervals Music to Their Ears? Spontaneous Acoustic Preferences in a Nonhuman Primate.J. Mcdermott & M. Hauser - 2004 - Cognition 94 (2):B11-B21.
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  28.  12
    Artifactual Kinds and Functional Design Features: What a Primate Understands Without Language.Marc D. Hauser - 1997 - Cognition 64 (3):285-308.
  29. The Argument From Disagreement and the Role of Cross-Cultural Empirical Data.Ben Fraser & Marc Hauser - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (5):541-560.
    The Argument from Disagreement (AD) (Mackie, 1977) depends upon empirical evidence for ‘fundamental’ moral disagreement (FMD) (Doris and Stich, 2005; Doris and Plakias, 2008). Research on the Southern ‘culture of honour’ (Nisbett and Cohen, 1996) has been presented as evidence for FMD between Northerners and Southerners within the US. We raise some doubts about the usefulness of such data in settling AD. We offer an alternative based on recent work in moral psychology that targets the potential universality of morally significant (...)
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  30.  12
    Object Individuation Using Property/Kind Information in Rhesus Macaques.Laurie R. Santos, Gregory M. Sulkowski, Geertrui M. Spaepen & Marc D. Hauser - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):241-264.
  31.  51
    The Moral-Conventional Distinction in Mature Moral Competence.Bryce Huebner, James Lee & Marc Hauser - 2010 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 10 (1-2):1-26.
    Developmental psychologists have long argued that the capacity to distinguish moral and conventional transgressions develops across cultures and emerges early in life. Children reliably treat moral transgressions as more wrong, more punishable, independent of structures of authority, and universally applicable. However, previous studies have not yet examined the role of these features in mature moral cognition. Using a battery of adult-appropriate cases (including vehicular and sexual assault, reckless behavior, and violations of etiquette and social contracts) we demonstrate that these features (...)
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  32. Cantor's Absolute in Metaphysics and Mathematics.Kai Hauser - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (2):161-188.
    This paper explores the metaphysical roots of Cantor’s conception of absolute infinity in order to shed some light on two basic issues that also affect the mathematical theory of sets: the viability of Cantor’s distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities, and the intrinsic justification of strong axioms of infinity that are studied in contemporary set theory.
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  33.  3
    Spontaneous Number Discrimination of Multi-Format Auditory Stimuli in Cotton-Top Tamarins.Marc D. Hauser, Stanislas Dehaene, Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz & Andrea L. Patalano - 2002 - Cognition 86 (2):B23-B32.
  34. Moral Judgments About Altruistic Self-Sacrifice: When Philosophical and Folk Intuitions Clash.Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):73-94.
    Altruistic self-sacrifice is rare, supererogatory, and not to be expected of any rational agent; but, the possibility of giving up one's life for the common good has played an important role in moral theorizing. For example, Judith Jarvis Thomson (2008) has argued in a recent paper that intuitions about altruistic self-sacrifice suggest that something has gone wrong in philosophical debates over the trolley problem. We begin by showing that her arguments face a series of significant philosophical objections; however, our project (...)
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  35.  99
    Concept Attribution in Nonhuman Animals: Theoretical and Methodological Problems in Ascribing Complex Mental Processes.Colin Allen & Marc D. Hauser - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (2):221-240.
    The demise of behaviorism has made ethologists more willing to ascribe mental states to animals. However, a methodology that can avoid the charge of excessive anthropomorphism is needed. We describe a series of experiments that could help determine whether the behavior of nonhuman animals towards dead conspecifics is concept mediated. These experiments form the basis of a general point. The behavior of some animals is clearly guided by complex mental processes. The techniques developed by comparative psychologists and behavioral ecologists are (...)
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  36. Gödel's Program Revisited Part I: The Turn to Phenomenology.Kai Hauser - 2006 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (4):529-590.
    Convinced that the classically undecidable problems of mathematics possess determinate truth values, Gödel issued a programmatic call to search for new axioms for their solution. The platonism underlying his belief in the determinateness of those questions in combination with his conception of intuition as a kind of perception have struck many of his readers as highly problematic. Following Gödel's own suggestion, this article explores ideas from phenomenology to specify a meaning for his mathematical realism that allows for a defensible epistemology.
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  37.  6
    The Consistency Strength of Projective Absoluteness.Kai Hauser - 1995 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 74 (3):245-295.
    It is proved that in the absence of proper class inner models with Woodin cardinals, for each n ε {1,…,ω}, ∑3 + n1 absoluteness implies there are n strong cardinals in K (where this denotes a suitably defined global version of the core model for one Woodin cardinal as exposed by Steel. Combined with a forcing argument of Woodin, this establishes that the consistency strength of ∑3 + n1 absoluteness is exactly that of n strong cardinals so that in particular (...)
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  38. Is Cantor's Continuum Problem Inherently Vague?Kai Hauser - 2002 - Philosophia Mathematica 10 (3):257-285.
    I examine various claims to the effect that Cantor's Continuum Hypothesis and other problems of higher set theory are ill-posed questions. The analysis takes into account the viability of the underlying philosophical views and recent mathematical developments.
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  39. Searle's Chinese Box: Debunking the Chinese Room Argument. [REVIEW]Larry Hauser - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (2):199-226.
    John Searle's Chinese room argument is perhaps the most influential andwidely cited argument against artificial intelligence (AI). Understood astargeting AI proper – claims that computers can think or do think– Searle's argument, despite its rhetorical flash, is logically andscientifically a dud. Advertised as effective against AI proper, theargument, in its main outlines, is an ignoratio elenchi. It musterspersuasive force fallaciously by indirection fostered by equivocaldeployment of the phrase "strong AI" and reinforced by equivocation on thephrase "causal powers" (at least) equal (...)
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  40.  15
    Mellow Monday and Furious Friday: The Approach-Related Link Between Anger and Time Representation.David J. Hauser, Margaret S. Carter & Brian P. Meier - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1166-1180.
    (2009). Mellow Monday and furious Friday: The approach-related link between anger and time representation. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 23, No. 6, pp. 1166-1180.
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  41.  36
    Evidence for a Non-Linguistic Distinction Between Singular and Plural Sets in Rhesus Monkeys.David Barner, Justin Wood, Marc Hauser & Susan Carey - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):603-622.
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  42.  19
    Generalization: A Practice of Situated Categorization in Talk. [REVIEW]Eric Hauser - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (2):183-198.
    This paper analyzes four instances in talk of generalization about people, that is, of using statements about one or more people as the basis of stating something about a category. Generalization can be seen as a categorization practice which involves a reflexive relationship between the generalized-from person or people and the generalized-to category. One thing that is accomplished through generalization is instruction in how to understand the identity of the generalized-from person or people, so in addition to being understood as (...)
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  43.  29
    Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall☆.J. Mcdermott & M. Hauser - 2007 - Cognition 104 (3):654-668.
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  44.  75
    Cantor's Concept of Set in the Light of Plato's Philebus.Kai Hauser - 2010 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):783-805.
    In explaining his concept of set Cantor intimates a connection with the metaphysical scheme put forward in Plato’s Philebus to determine the place of pleasure. We argue that these determinations capture key ideas of Cantorian set theory and, moreover, extend to intuitions which continue to play a central role in the modern mathematics of infinity.
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  45.  56
    Indescribable Cardinals and Elementary Embeddings.Kai Hauser - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (2):439-457.
  46.  99
    Lotze and Husserl.Kai Hauser - 2003 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (2):152-178.
  47.  13
    Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Individuate and Enumerate Small Numbers of Non-Solid Portions.Justin N. Wood, Marc D. Hauser, David D. Glynn & David Barner - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):207-221.
  48.  10
    Beyond Intersubjectivity: Task Orientation and First Language Use in Foreign Language Discussions.Eric Hauser - 2013 - Pragmatics and Society 4 (3):285-316.
    One type of task interaction that students in a foreign language class may do is using the language they are studying for discussion. This paper analyzes interaction among Japanese university students participating in such discussions in English. The participants are interactionally competent; one source of resources they draw on to construct this competence is their first language, Japanese. Participants occasionally use Japanese to refer to Japanese things. They also use Japanese in the pursuit of intersubjectivity, such as using Japanese to (...)
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  49.  14
    RETRACTED: Rule Learning by Cotton-Top Tamarins.Marc D. Hauser, Daniel Weiss & Gary Marcus - 2002 - Cognition 86 (1):B15-B22.
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  50.  40
    Is Choice Self-Evident?Kai Hauser - 2005 - American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):237 - 261.
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