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17th/18th Century Philosophy

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  1. added 2014-07-22
    Katherine A. East (2014). Superstitionis Malleus: John Toland, Cicero, and the War on Priestcraft in Early Enlightenment England. History of European Ideas 40 (7):965-983.
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  2. added 2014-07-20
    Tyler Doggett, Moving Cartesian Bodies.
    Argues that Descartes's commitment to mind-body causation leads to a commitment to body-body causation.
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  3. added 2014-07-20
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). The Discourse of the Syncope: Logodaedalus. Stanford.
    Why is it that the modern conception of literature begins with one of the worst writers of the philosophical tradition? Such is the paradoxical question that lies at the heart of Jean-Luc Nancy’s highly original and now-classic study of the role of language in the critical philosophy of Kant. While Kant did not turn his attention very often to the philosophy of language, Nancy demonstrates to what extent he was anything but oblivious to it. He shows, in fact, that the (...)
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  4. added 2014-07-20
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1983). L'impératif catégorique. Flammarion.
    Il ne s'agit pas de morale. Il s'agit de ce qui nous oblige, de ce qui fait de nous des êtres-obligés : une loi au-delà de la loi, qui nous est donnée et à laquelle nous sommes abandonnés.
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  5. added 2014-07-17
    Colin McLear (forthcoming). The Kantian (Non)-Conceptualism Debate. Philosophy Compass.
    One of the central debates in contemporary Kant scholarship concerns whether Kant endorses a “conceptualist” account of the nature of sensory experience. Understanding the debate is crucial for getting a full grasp of Kant’s theory of mind, cognition, perception, and epistemology. This paper situates the debate in the context of Kant’s broader theory of cognition and surveys some of the major arguments for conceptualist and non-conceptualist interpretations of his critical philosophy.
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  6. added 2014-07-12
    Ian Proops (2014). Kant on the Cosmological Argument. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (12):1-21.
    In the first Critique Kant levels two main charges against the cosmological argument. First, it commits the fallacy of ignoratio elenchi. Second, in two rather different ways, it presupposes the ontological argument. Commentators have struggled to find merit in either of these charges. The paper argues that they can nonetheless be shown to have some merit, so long as one takes care to correctly identify the version of the cosmological argument that Kant means to be attacking. That turns out to (...)
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  7. added 2014-07-09
    Laura Papish (forthcoming). Moral Feeling and Moral Conversion in Kant's "Religion" in Advance. Idealistic Studies.
    Kant’s account of moral feeling is continually disputed in the secondary literature. My goal is to focus on the Religion and make sense of moral feeling as it appears in this context. I argue that we can best understand moral feeling if we note its place in Kant’s concerns about the possibility of moral conversion. As Kant notes, if the new, morally upright man is of a different character than the man he used to be, then it remains unclear how (...)
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  8. added 2014-07-09
    Henny Blomme (2013). The Vagaries of Chiba's Idealism. [REVIEW] Critique. A Philosophical Review Bulletin 2:17-23.
    The goal of Chiba’s book is to answer the following question: Is Kant’s ‘transcendental idealism’ ‘realism’ or ‘idealism’? (p. 2) Chiba concludes that Kant is an anti-realist: objects do not exist independently of our cognition. Chiba’s book contains a lot of interesting and precise analysis of parts of Kant’s argument in the Critique of Pure Reason. So it should be clear that the following remarks, although they express disagreement or reservation, are in no sense meant to hold back anyone from (...)
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  9. added 2014-07-08
    Sylvie Loriaux (2014). Hobbesian Sovereigns and the Question of Supra-State Authority. Jurisprudence 5 (1):56-74.
    Thomas Hobbes has often been portrayed as supporting a 'realist' view of international relations—a view in which everything is permitted among states, in which the insecurity of the international sphere justifies states in unrestrainedly pursuing the national interest. Yet, as this paper aims to show, this interpretation is not without difficulties. It overshadows both the advantages that Hobbes believes can be gained from interstate cooperation and the fundamental role he attributes to a superior common authority in making cooperative ventures stable (...)
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  10. added 2014-07-08
    Martina Reuter (2014). “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau. Hypatia 29 (3).
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on women (...)
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  11. added 2014-07-08
    Martina Reuter, Lena Halldenius & Alan Coffee (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy and Enlightenment. Hypatia 29 (3).
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  12. added 2014-07-08
    Arnaud Milanese (2014). Nécessité et imputation chez Hobbes : Se démarquer d’Aristote et se démarquer de la scolastique. Philosophiques 41 (1):3-35.
    Arnaud Milanese | : La philosophie pratique de Hobbes est problématique parce que son déterminisme ne semble pas permettre une théorie de l’action : comment penser l’imputation des actes, si l’on soutient que le libre-arbitre n’existe pas ? 1) Son analyse se construit à travers la critique de la théorie scolastique du libre arbitre (dans la controverse avec Bramhall), et, à cette fin, Hobbes semble puiser dans l’analyse d’Aristote pour y reprendre sa distinction entre actions volontaires et involontaires. 2) Mais (...)
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  13. added 2014-07-08
    Pauline Kleingeld (1995). Fortschritt und Vernunft: Zur Geschichtsphilosophie Kants. Königshausen und Neumann.
    The goal of this study is to reconstruct and evaluate the systematic role of Kant's views on history within his ‛critical' philosophy. Kant's philosophy of history has been neglected in the literature, largely due to the widespread though mistaken perception that it is at odds with central assumptions of Kant’s ‘critical’ thought. I discuss Kant's most important texts on history and examine the relationship between Kant's view of history and the central tenets of his Critiques (in particular, Kant's conception of (...)
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  14. added 2014-07-08
    F. I. G. Rawlins (1954). The Cambridge Platonists. Nature 174 (4428):475.
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  15. added 2014-07-03
    Dennis Schulting & Christian Onof (forthcoming). Space as Form of Intuition and as Formal Intuition. On the Note to B160 in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Philosophical Review 124 (1).
    In his argument for the possibility of knowledge of spatial objects, in the Transcendental Deduction of the B-version of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant makes a crucial distinction between space as ‘form of intuition’ and space as ‘formal intuition.’ The traditional interpretation regards the distinction between the two notions as reflecting a distinction between indeterminate space and determinations of space by the understanding respectively. By contrast, a recent influential reading has argued that the two notions can be fused into (...)
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  16. added 2014-06-30
    James Schmidt (2014). “This New Conquering Empire of Light and Reason”: Edmund Burke, James Gillray, and the Dangers of Enlightenment. Diametros 40:126-148.
    This article examines the use of images of “light” and “enlightenment” in Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France and in the controversy that greeted the book, with an emphasis on caricatures of Burke and his book by James Gillray and others. Drawing on Hans Blumenberg’s discussion of the metaphor of “light as truth,” it situates this controversy within the broader usage of images of light and reason in eighteenth-century frontispieces and (drawing on the work of J. G. A. (...)
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  17. added 2014-06-30
    Eric Schliesser (2014). Toland and Adam Smith's Posthumous Work. Diametros 40:115-125.
    In this paper I offer a speculative answer to the question why Adam Smith, who burned nearly all of his papers, arranged for posthumous publication for a number of his essays. I rely on a number of hints in those essays and put them in the context of eighteenth century natural philosophy. I argue that those hints trace back to John Toland and Spinozism.
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  18. added 2014-06-30
    Danny Frederick (2014). Voluntary Slavery. Las Torres de Lucca 4:115-37.
  19. added 2014-06-29
    David Forman (forthcoming). Kant’s Moderate Cynicism and the Harmony Between Virtue and Worldly Happiness. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    For Kant, any authentic moral demands are wholly distinct from the demands of prudence. This has led critics to complain that Kantian moral demands are incompatible with our human nature as happiness-seekers. Kant’s defenders have pointed out, correctly, that Kant can and does assert that it is permissible, at least in principle, to pursue our own happiness. But this response does not eliminate the worry that a life organized around the pursuit of virtue might turn out to be one from (...)
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  20. added 2014-06-29
    Jonathan Cottrell (forthcoming). A Puzzle About Fictions in the 'Treatise'. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    I present a conflict involving Hume’s claim that certain “fictions of the imagination”—like that of an unchangeable, yet enduring object—are “improper,” “inexact” or not “strict.” I argue that this claim is inconsistent with other commitments that Hume has, concerning how the imagination produces fictions and how we form general representations. I consider several ways in which he is likely to respond to this argument, and argue that he cannot consistently accept any of them. I conclude that we face an unsolved (...)
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  21. added 2014-06-29
    Philippe Huneman (2014). Kant Vs. Leibniz in the Second Antinomy: Organisms Are Not Infinitely Subtle Machines. Kant-Studien 105 (2):155-195.
    This paper interprets the two pages devoted in the Critique of Pure Reason to a critique of Leibniz’s view of organisms as infinitely organized machines. It argues that this issue of organisms represents a crucial test-case for Kant in regard to the conflicting notions of space, continuity and divisibility held by classical metaphysics and by criticism. I first present Leibniz’s doctrine and its justification. In a second step, I explain the general reasoning by which Kant defines the problem of the (...)
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  22. added 2014-06-29
    Samantha Matherne (2014). Kant and the Art of Schematism. Kantian Review 19 (2):181-205.
    In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant describes schematism as a (A141/B180–1). While most commentators treat this as Kant's metaphorical way of saying schematism is something too obscure to explain, I argue that we should follow up Kant's clue and treat schematism literally as Kunst. By letting our interpretation of schematism be guided by Kant's theoretically exact ways of using the term Kunst in the Critique of Judgment we gain valuable insight into the nature of schematism, as well as its (...)
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  23. added 2014-06-27
    Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
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  24. added 2014-06-27
    Andrea Ciceri (2011). La lettura del male radicale in Kant proposta da Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 4 (2011):691-706.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
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  25. added 2014-06-26
    Ruth Boeker (forthcoming). The Moral Dimension in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31.
    I offer an interpretation of John Locke’s account of persons and personal identity that gives full credit to Locke’s claim that “person” is a forensic term, sheds new light on the relation between Locke’s characterizations of a person in sections 9 and 26, and explains how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. I show that Locke’s claim that sameness of consciousness is necessary for personal identity (...)
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  26. added 2014-06-26
    Ruth Boeker, John Locke: Identity, Persons, and Personal Identity. Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
  27. added 2014-06-25
    Karin de Boer (2014). Kant's Multi-Layered Conception of Things in Themselves, Transcendental Objects, and Monads. Kant-Studien 105 (2):221-260.
    While Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason maintains that things in themselves cannot be known, he also seems to assert that they affect our senses and produce representations. Following Jacobi, many commentators have considered these claims to be contradictory. Instead of adding another artificial solution to the existing literature on this subject, I maintain that Kant’s use of terms such as thing-in-itself, noumenon, and transcendental object becomes perfectly consistent if we take them to acquire a different meaning in the (...)
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  28. added 2014-06-23
    Emilian Mihailov (2013). The Normativity of Kant's Formula of the Law of Nature. Romanian Journal of Analytic Philosophy (2):57-81.
    Many Kantian scholars have debated what normative guidance the formula of the law of nature provides. There are three ways of understanding the role of FLN in Kant’s ethics. The first line of interpretation claims that FLN and FLU are logically equivalent. The second line claims that there are only subjective differences, meaning that FLN is easier to apply than the abstrct method of FUL. The third line of interpretation claims that there are objective differences between FLN and FUL in (...)
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  29. added 2014-06-21
    Robert Hanna (2014). Kant's Anti-Mechanism and Kantian Anti-Mechanism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46:112-116.
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  30. added 2014-06-20
    María G. Navarro (2014). Fotografía de un método. Revista Cronopio 51 (12 june).
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  31. added 2014-06-19
    Kathryn Tabb (2014). The Fate of Nebuchadnezzar. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):13-34.
    This paper makes a case for the centrality of the passion of curiosity to Hobbes’s account of human nature. Hobbes describes curiosity as one of only a few capacities differentiating human beings from animals, and I argue that it is in fact the fundamen- tal cause of humanity’s uniqueness, generating other important difference-makers such as language, science and politics. I qualify Philip Pettit’s (2008) claim that Hobbes believes language to be the essence of human difference, contending that Pettit grants language (...)
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  32. added 2014-06-19
    Peter Machamer (2014). Thomas Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):1-12.
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  33. added 2014-06-19
    Geoffrey Gorham (2014). Hobbes on the Reality of Time. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):80-103.
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  34. added 2014-06-19
    Edward Slowik (2014). Hobbes and the Phantasm of Space. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):61-79.
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  35. added 2014-06-17
    Jeanine Grenberg (2014). Humility, Kantian Style. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
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  36. added 2014-06-16
    Howard D. Kelly (2014). Heidegger the Metaphysician: Modes‐of‐Being and Grundbegriffe. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).
    Modes-of-being (Seinsarten) figure centrally in Heidegger's masterwork 'Being and Time'. Testimony to this is Heidegger's characterisation of two of his most celebrated enquiries—the Existential analytic and the Zeug analysis—as investigations into the respective modes-of-being of the entities concerned. Yet despite the importance of this concept, commentators disagree widely about what a mode-of-being is. In this paper, I systematically outline and defend a novel and exegetically grounded interpretation of this concept. Strongly opposed to Kantian readings, such as those advocated by Taylor (...)
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  37. added 2014-06-15
    Terence Rajivan Edward, Why Does Descartes Say That He is Not His Body in the Second Meditation?
    This paper contests a standard interpretation of how Descartes comes to the conclusion that he is not his body in the second meditation. I propose an alternative interpretation in its place.
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  38. added 2014-06-12
    Melissa McBay Merritt (forthcoming). Kant on the Pleasures of Understanding. In Alix Cohen (ed.), Kant on Emotion and Value. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Why did Kant write the Critique of Judgment, and why did he say that his analysis of the judgment of taste — his technical term for our enjoyment of beauty — is the most important part of it? Kant claims that his analysis of taste “reveals a property of our faculty of cognition that without this analysis would have remained unknown” (KU §8, 5:213). The clue lies in Kant’s view that while taste is an aesthetic, and non-cognitive, mode of judgment, (...)
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  39. added 2014-06-10
    Will Dudley & Kristina Engelhardt (eds.) (2011). Immanuel Kant: Key Concepts. Acumen.
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  40. added 2014-06-10
    Amy M. Schmitter (2004). On the Eternal Truths: A Commentary on Papers by G. Walski, I. Agostini, and L. Devillairs. In G. Belgioiso (ed.), Descartes e i Suoi Avverari: incontri Cartesiani II. Le Monnier Università. 61-70.
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  41. added 2014-06-09
    Amy Schmitter (2014). The Third Meditation on Objective Being: Representation and Intentional Content. In David Cunning (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes’ Meditations. Cambridge University Press. 149-67.
  42. added 2014-06-09
    Peter R. Anstey (2014). Philosophy of Experiment in Early Modern England: The Case of Bacon, Boyle and Hooke. Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):103-132.
  43. added 2014-06-09
    Amy Schmitter (2012). Responses to Vulnerability: Medicine, Politics and the Body in Descartes and Spinoza. In Stephen Pender & Nancy S. Struever (eds.), Rhetoric and Medicine in Early Modern Europe. Ashgate Publishing. 147-171.
  44. added 2014-06-09
    Amy M. Schmitter (2011). Natural Passions, Reason and Religious Emotion in Hobbes & Spinoza. In Ingolf U. Dalferth & Michael Rodgers (eds.), Passions and Passivity: Claremont Studies in Religion 2009. Mohr Siebeck. 49-68.
  45. added 2014-06-09
    Amy M. Schmitter (2009). Making an Object of Yourself: Hume on the Intentionality of the Passions. In Jon Miller (ed.), Topics in Early Modern Philosophy of Mind. Springer Verlag. 223-40.
  46. added 2014-06-09
    Amy M. Schmitter (2008). How to Engineer a Human Being: Passions and Functional Explanation in Descartes. In Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.), A Companion to Descartes. Blackwell. 426-444.
  47. added 2014-06-09
    Amy Morgan Schmitter (2005). The Passionate Intellect: Reading the (Non-) Opposition of Intellect and Emotion in Descartes. In Joyce Jenkins, Jennifer Whiting & Christopher Williams (eds.), Persons and Passions: Essays in Honor of Annette Baier. University of Notre Dame Press. 48-82.
  48. added 2014-06-05
    Paul Abela (2013). Review: Smith & Sullivan (Eds), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):148-154.
    Book Reviews Paul Abela, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  49. added 2014-06-04
    Helga Varden (2014). Patriotism, Poverty, and Global Justice: A Kantian Engagement with Pauline Kleingeld's Kant and Cosmopolitanism. Kantian Review 19 (2):251-266.
    In this article I critically engage some of the philosophical ideas Kleingeld presents in Kant and Cosmopolitanism, namely patriotism, poverty and global justice. Against Kleingeld, I propose, first, that perhaps democracy is less important and affectionate love more so to both Kant himself as well as to an account that can successfully refute a Bernard Williams style objection to Kantian patriotism; second, that guaranteeing unconditional poverty relief for all its citizens is constitutive of the minimally just state for Kant; and, (...)
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  50. added 2014-06-04
    John H. Zammito (2014). Review: Mensch, Kant's Organicism: Epigenesis and the Development of Critical Philosophy. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 19 (2):323-327.
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