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17th/18th Century Philosophy

Edited by Brandon Look (University of Kentucky)
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  1. added 2016-05-31
    Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Swanton, Christine. The Virtue Ethics of Hume & Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Ethics.
    This book has a noble aim: to free virtue ethics from the grip of the neo-Aristotelianism that limits its scope in contemporary Anglophone philosophy. Just as there are deontological views that are not Kant’s or even Kantian, just as there are consequentialist views that are not Bentham’s or even utilitarian, so, Swanton contends, there are viable virtue ethical views that are not Aristotle’s or even Aristotelian. Indeed, the history of both Eastern and Western philosophy suggests that the majority of normative (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-31
    Megan Gallagher (forthcoming). Fear, Liberty, and Honorable Death in Montesquieu’s Persian Letters. Eighteenth-Century Fiction 28 (4).
    I read Montesquieu’s 'Persian Letters' as an attempt to theorize a liberated alternative to despotic rule. As Montesquieu argues in 'The Spirit of the Laws,' fear—specifically fear of the ruler’s emotional and material excesses—dominates the life of the despotic subject. Although in the 'Letters' the seraglio is the despotic state’s parallel, the seraglio is the site of over owing and barely governed passions. Montesquieu’s solution to the excesses of the seraglio is not the eradication of emotion; rather, he o ers (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-31
    Roger I. Emerson & Mark G. Spencer (2016). A Bibliography for Hume's History of England: A Preliminary View. Hume Studies 40 (1):53-71.
    Hume’s History of England has received a good deal of attention over the years, but no one has ever systematically studied his sources.1 Instead, scholars have worried about Hume’s biases, his portraits of figures like Charles I, and his alleged scorn for mere antiquarianism, which resulted in a readable but superficial history. The most exciting monograph dealing with his History of England in recent years sees it as a step in the process which led to nineteenth-century historicism. Others have seen (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-31
    Andreas Kemmerling (2015). The Conceptual Inexhaustibility of Personhood. Tsinghua Studies in Western Philosophy 1 (1):368-399.
    Some leading neuro-scientists recently proclaimed an obviously false view that a human person is his/her brain. This falsity arises partly from the conceptual difficulties concerning personhood/a person. By revealing inexhaustible richness of the characteristics of this concept of a person, this essay explains why the concept is so utterly puzzling. The author contrasts Descartes’ concept of a person with Locke’s. For Descartes, the concept has four features: (1) it is the concept of the mind/body-union; (2) it is innate and a (...)
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  5. added 2016-05-31
    Maurice Finocchiaro (2013). Meta-Argumentation. College Publications.
  6. added 2016-05-30
    Corey W. Dyck (forthcoming). Tetens as a Reader of Kant's Inaugural Dissertation. In Violetta L. Waibel & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Akten des 12. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses “Natur und Freiheit” in Wien vom 21.–25. September 2015.
    In this paper I consider Tetens' reaction to Kant's Inaugural Dissertation in his two most important philosophical works, the essay “Über die allgemeine speculativische Philosophie” of 1775 and the two-volume Philosophische Versuche of 1777. In particular, I focus on Tetens’ critical discussion of Kant's account of the acquisition of concepts of space and time.
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  7. added 2016-05-30
    Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (forthcoming). Kant on the Relation of Intuition to Cognition. In Dennis Schulting (ed.), Kantian Nonconceptualism. Palgrave Macmillan
    Recent debates in the interpretation of Kant’s theoretical philosophy have focused on the nature of Kantian intuition and, in particular, on the question of whether intuitions depend for their existence on the existence of their objects. In this paper we show how opposing answers to this question determine different accounts of the nature of Kantian cognition and we suggest that progress can be made on determining the nature of intuition by considering the implications different views have for the nature of (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-30
    Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.) (forthcoming). Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self. Oxford University Press.
    Contents: 0. Introduction Anil Gomes and Andrew Stephenson 1. Kant, The Philosophy Of Mind, And Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy Anil Gomes 2. Synthesis And Binding Lucy Allais 3. Understanding Non-Conceptual Representation Of Objects: Empirical Models Of Sensibility’s Operation Katherine Dunlop 4. Are Kantian Intuitions Object-Dependent? Stefanie Grüne 5. Intuition And Presence Colin McLear 6. Imagination And Inner Intuition Andrew Stephenson 7. Inner Sense And Time Ralf M. Bader 8. Can’t Kant Cognize Himself? Or, A Problem For (Almost) Every Interpretation Of (...)
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  9. added 2016-05-30
    Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the meaning (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-29
    Marco Vinícius de Siqueira Côrtes, Origem do sujeito transcendental kantiano. Filosofia Alemã: De Kant a Hegel (Encontro Nacional Anpof).
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  11. added 2016-05-28
    Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Knowledge, Discipline, System, Hope: The Fate of Metaphysics in the Doctrine of Method. In O'Shea James (ed.), Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
  12. added 2016-05-28
    Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Leibniz on Innate Ideas and Kant on the Origin of the Categories. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    In his essay against Eberhard, Kant denies that there are innate concepts. Several scholars take Kant’s statement at face value. They claim that Kant did not endorse concept innatism, that the categories are not innate concepts, and that Kant’s views on innateness are significantly different from Leibniz’s. This paper takes issue with those claims. It argues that Kant’s views on the origin of the intellectual concepts are remarkably similar to Leibniz’s. Given two widespread notions of innateness, the dispositional notion and (...)
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  13. added 2016-05-28
    Daniel Dohrn (2011). Brandoms Kantische Lehren. In C. Barth & H. Sturm (eds.), Brandoms Expressive Vernunft. Mentis 41-71.
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  14. added 2016-05-26
    John J. Callanan (forthcoming). The Poverty of Conceptual Truth: Kant’s Analytic/Synthetic Distinction and the Limits of Metaphysics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  15. added 2016-05-26
    Andrew Stephenson (forthcoming). Relationalism About Perception Vs. Relationalism About Perceptuals. Kantian Review.
    There is a tension at the heart of Lucy Allais’ new account of Kant’s transcendental idealism. The problem arises from her use of two incompatible theories in contemporary philosophy – relationalism about perception, or naïve realism, and relationalism about colour, or more generally relationalism about any such perceptual property. The problem is that the former requires a more robust form of realism about the properties of the objects of perception than can be accommodated in the partially idealistic framework of the (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-26
    Andrew Stephenson (forthcoming). Imagination and Inner Intuition. In Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.), Kant and the philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self. Oxford University Press
    In this paper I return to the question of whether intuition is object-dependent. Kant’s account of the imagination appears to suggest that intuition is not object-dependent. On a recent proposal, however, the imagination is a faculty of merely inner intuition, the inner objects of which exist and are present in the way demanded by object-dependence views, such as Lucy Allais’s relational account. I argue against this proposal on both textual and philosophical grounds. It is inconsistent with what Kant says about (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-26
    Benedict Smith (2016). Naturalism, Experience, and Hume’s ‘Science of Human Nature’. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (3):310-323.
    A standard interpretation of Hume’s naturalism is that it paved the way for a scientistic and ‘disenchanted’ conception of the world. My aim in this paper is to show that this is a restrictive reading of Hume, and it obscures a different and profitable interpretation of what Humean naturalism amounts to. The standard interpretation implies that Hume’s ‘science of human nature’ was a reductive investigation into our psychology. But, as Hume explains, the subject matter of this science is not restricted (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-26
    Galen Strawson (2015). ''Humeanism''. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1:96--102.
    ABSTRACT ABSTRACT: In metaphysics, the adjective ‘Humean’ is used to describe positions that deny the existence of any necessary connection or causal influence in concrete reality. This usage has been significantly reinforced by David Lewis’s employment of ‘Humean’ in the phrase ‘Humean supervenience’. It is, however, not at all clear that this usage is appropriate. Lewis himself raised a doubt about it.
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  19. added 2016-05-26
    David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.) (2009). Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. OUP Oxford.
    Now in its second edition, this comprehensive introduction to the history of Western political thought includes two new chapters on Cicero and Kant.
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  20. added 2016-05-26
    Paul Russell (2002). Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. OUP Usa.
    David Hume is generally credited with the classic "compatibilist" position in the free will debate. Paul Russell argues that the full range of Hume's views on this subject, although hugely influential, has not been adequately represented in standard Humean scholarship. Observing that studies of Hume's general strategy have tended to overlook his naturalistic concerns, Russell proposes that a more careful scrutiny of his work will demonstrate the importance of these concerns, their continuing relevance to Humean thought, and his contribution to (...)
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  21. added 2016-05-26
    David Hume, Selected Essays.
    In his writings, David Hume set out to bridge the gap between the learned world of the academy and the marketplace of polite society. This collection, drawing largely on his Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, which was even more popular than his famous Treatise of Human Nature, comprehensively shows how far he succeeded. From 'Of Essay Writing' to 'Of the Rise and Progress of the Arts and Sciences' Hume embraces a staggering range of social, cultural, political, demographic, and historical concerns. (...)
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  22. added 2016-05-26
    David Hume, Index by L. A. Selby-Bigge & Notes by P. H. Nidditch (1971). Enquiries: Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals. OUP Oxford.
    A scholarly edition of a work by David Hume. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  23. added 2016-05-25
    Matias Slavov (2016). Empiricism and Relationism Intertwined: Hume and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (2):247-263.
    Einstein acknowledged that his reading of Hume influenced the development of his special theory of relativity. In this article, I juxtapose Hume’s philosophy with Einstein’s philosophical analysis related to his special relativity. I argue that there are two common points to be found in their writings, namely an empiricist theory of ideas and concepts, and a relationist ontology regarding space and time. The main thesis of this article is that these two points are intertwined in Hume and Einstein.
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  24. added 2016-05-25
    Ari Maunu (2015). Leibnizin vastaväitteitä molinistiselle voluntarismille (in Finnish) [Leibniz's Objections to Molinist Voluntarism]. Ajatus 72:53-69.
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  25. added 2016-05-25
    Ari Maunu (2015). Leibnizian Rejection of Standard Thought Experiments Against Identity of Indiscernibles. Metaphysica 16 (2):189-193.
    It is argued that from a genuine Leibnizian point of view the well-known thought experiment, call it BTE, involving a possible world with only two exactly similar objects, cannot be used to refute Leibniz's Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles (LIdI). If the claim that there are two objects in BTE is based on primitive thisnesses, the Leibnizian objection is that there are no such things; and even if there were, then, quite generally, something true of one object – that (...)
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  26. added 2016-05-25
    Andrew Chignell (2014). Rational Hope, Possibility, and Divine Action. In Gordon E. Michalson (ed.), Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press 98-117.
    Commentators typically neglect the distinct nature and role of hope in Kant’s system, and simply lump it together with the sort of Belief that arises from the moral proof. Kant himself is not entirely innocent of the conflation. Here I argue, however, that from a conceptual as well as a textual point of view, hope should be regarded as a different kind of attitude. It is an attitude that we can rationally adopt toward some of the doctrines that are not (...)
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  27. added 2016-05-24
    Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (May 2016). Hume's Sceptical Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:N/A.
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  28. added 2016-05-24
    Lawrence Pasternack (forthcoming). "Kant's Fourfold Critique of the Ontological Argument: Conceptual Containment, Predication, and the Portents of Free Logic". In Graham Oppy (ed.), The Ontological Argument (Cambridge Classic Philosophical Arguments Series). Cambridge University Press
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  29. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Heraclitean Critique of Kantian and Enlightenment Ethics Through the Fijian Ethos. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):143-165.
    Kant makes a much-unexpected confession in a much-unexpected place. In the Criticism of the third paralogism of transcendental psychology of the first Critique Kant accepts the irrefutability of the Heraclitean notion of universal becoming or the transitory nature of all things, admitting the impossibility of positing a totally persistent and self-conscious subject. The major Heraclitean doctrine of panta rhei makes it impossible to conduct philosophical inquiry by assuming a self-conscious subject or “I,” which would potentially be in constant motion like (...)
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  30. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  32. added 2016-05-23
    Christian Maurer (2016). Thomas Ahnert, The Moral Culture of Scottish Enlightenment, 1690–1805. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):200-205.
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  33. added 2016-05-23
    Emily Dumler-Winckler (2016). Silvia Sebastiani, The Scottish Enlightenment: Race, Gender and the Limits of Progress. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):208-211.
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  34. added 2016-05-20
    Hermann Cohen & Lydia Patton (2015). The Relationship of Logic to Physics, From the Introduction to the Ninth Edition of Lange’s History of Materialism (1914). In Sebastian Luft (ed.), The Neo-Kantian Reader. Routledge
    A translation of one section of Hermann Cohen's introduction to Friedrich Albert Lange's History of Materialism.
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  35. added 2016-05-20
    Hermann Cohen, David Hyder & Lydia Patton (2015). Introduction From The Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and Its History (1883). In Sebastian Luft (ed.), The Neo-Kantian Reader. Routledge
    A translation of the Introduction to Hermann Cohen's 1883 work The Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and Its History.
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  36. added 2016-05-18
    Catherine Kemp (forthcoming). "Dewey's Darwin and Darwin's Hume". The Pluralist.
    In The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy (1910), Dewey characterizes Hume as an orthodox empiricist wedded to a static and unchanging view of mental life. The lead essay argues that Darwinism is a cure for the errors of traditional empiricism. This paper demonstrates that Hume is a precursor to Darwin, and thus to Dewey, by reviewing the historical case that Hume directly influenced Darwin’s theory of evolution. Using Dewey’s discussion of the design versus chance problem, the paper throws light on (...)
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  37. added 2016-05-18
    Catherine Kemp (forthcoming). "The False Hume in Pragmatism". The Pluralist.
    The atomist Hume inherited by classical American pragmatism is a false Hume. I trace the origins and reception of the atomist Hume in the pragmatic tradition and the correction of this reading in modern Hume scholarship, and then argue (1) that in the Treatise Hume assumes that we first encounter wholes, not parts, in experience, (2) that the distinction of parts is possible only after the experience of wholes, and (3) that their distinction as well as their separation is not (...)
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  38. added 2016-05-18
    Miren Boehm (2016). Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):55-77.
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in thethat he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on Book 1. I (...)
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  39. added 2016-05-18
    Nathan Sasser (2016). Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):183-187.
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  40. added 2016-05-18
    Timothy M. Costelloe (2016). Don Garrett, Hume. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):165-170.
  41. added 2016-05-18
    Wade L. Robison (2016). James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):137-151.
  42. added 2016-05-18
    Catherine Legg & James Franklin (2015). Perceiving Necessity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1).
    In many diagrams one seems to perceive necessity – one sees not only that something is so, but that it must be so. That conflicts with a certain empiricism largely taken for granted in contemporary philosophy, which believes perception is not capable of such feats. The reason for this belief is often thought well-summarized in Hume's maxim: ‘there are no necessary connections between distinct existences’. It is also thought that even if there were such necessities, perception is too passive or (...)
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  43. added 2016-05-18
    R. Jessop, Thomas Brown: Negotiating a Position Between Hume and Reid.
  44. added 2016-05-18
    Peter Baumann (2011). Molyneux's Question and the Berkeleian Answer. In Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Perspectivas de la Modernidad. Siglos XVI, XVII y XVIII. Colección Artes y Humanidades 217-234.
    Amongst those who answered Molyneux’s question in the negative or at least not in the positive, George Berkeley is of particular interest because he argued for a very radical position. Most of his contribution to the discussion can be found in his Essay towards a New Theory of Vision. I will give an exposition of his view (2) and then move on to a critical discussion of this kind of view, - what one could call the “Berkeleian view” (3). I (...)
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  45. added 2016-05-16
    Corey W. Dyck, Kant on Wolff's General Logic.
    In this paper, I consider the basis for Kant's praise of Wolff's general logic as "the best we have." I argue that Wolff's logic was highly esteemed by Kant on account of its novel analysis of the three operations of the mind (tres operationes mentis), in the course of which Wolff formulates an argument for the priority of the understanding's activity of judging.
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  46. added 2016-05-16
    Hemmo Laiho (forthcoming). Kant on Representing Negative States of Affairs. Topoi:1-12.
    In this paper, I investigate Kant’s view of the cognitive role of perceptions, judgements, and the three categories of Quality in representing negative states of affairs. The paper addresses the following problem. In his account of empirical cognition, Kant seems to limit the legitimate application of the categories to things perceptually available to us, or, more generally, to positive cases. However, Kant also seems to hold that negative states of affairs, such as the absence of a thing, cannot be perceived. (...)
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  47. added 2016-05-16
    Éric Marquer (2016). Le signe et les fondements de la certitude chez Hobbes. Methodos 16.
    Hobbes établit une distinction entre signes certains et signes incertains, qui correspond à la distinction entre science et prudence. Mais il précise toutefois que les signes de la science ne sont pas tous certains, ni infaillibles. Cette recommandation n’est pas tant une critique de la science, qu’une mise en garde adressée à ceux qui renoncent à leur jugement naturel et s’en remettent aveuglément à l’autorité des livres. La certitude dépend donc d’un bon usage des signes de la part du sujet (...)
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  48. added 2016-05-14
    Fabian Dorsch (2016). Hume. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 40-54.
    This chapter overviews Hume’s thoughts on the nature and role of imagining and focusses primarily on three important distinctions that Hume draws among our conscious mental episodes: (i) between impressions and ideas; (ii) between ideas of the memory and ideas of the imagination; and (iii), among the ideas of the imagination, between ideas of the judgement and ideas of the fancy. In addition, the chapter considers Hume’s views on the imagination as a faculty of producing ideas, as well as on (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-12
    Marius Stan (forthcoming). Rationalist Foundations and the Science of Force. In Brandon Look & Frederick Beiser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press
  50. added 2016-05-12
    Douglas Hedley, Sarah Hutton & David Leech (eds.) (forthcoming). Cambridge Platonism: Sources and Legacies.
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