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17th/18th Century Philosophy

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  1. added 2016-06-23
    Colin Marshall (forthcoming). Kant on Impenetrability, Touch, and the Causal Content of Perception. European Journal of Philosophy.
    ABSTRACT: It is well known that Kant claims that causal judgments, including judgments about forces, must have an a priori basis. It is less well known that Kant claims that we can perceive the repulsive force of bodies (their impenetrability) through the sense of touch. Together, these claims present an interpretive puzzle, since they appear to commit Kant to both affirming and denying that we can have perceptions of force. My first aim is to show that both sides of the (...)
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  2. added 2016-06-16
    Christel Fricke (2005). L'homme législateur et bricoleur: Crusius prédécesseur de Kant. In Robert Theis & Lukas K. Sosoe (eds.), Les sources de la philosophie kantienne au XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Vrin 193-201.
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  3. added 2016-06-13
    Corey W. Dyck, Leibniz's Wolffian Psychology.
    In this paper, I attempt to trace the broader contours of a putative Leibnizian psychology by adopting the rather unusual, and perhaps historically dubious, strategy of outlining the continuities between Leibniz’s discussion of the soul and the much more detailed and systematic psychological writings of his German successor, Christian Wolff.
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  4. added 2016-06-13
    William Hannegan (forthcoming). Hume, Dispositional Essentialism, and Where to Find the Idea of Necessary Connection. Philosophia:1-5.
    Dispositional essentialists hold that the world is populated by irreducibly dispositional properties, called “potencies,” “powers,” or “dispositions.” Each of these properties is marked out by a characteristic stimulus and manifestation bound together in a metaphysically necessary connection. Dispositional essentialism faces an old objection from David Hume. Hume argues, in his Treatise of Human Nature, that we have no adequate idea of necessary connection. The epistemology of the Treatise allegedly rules the idea out. Dispositional essentialists usually respond by attacking Hume’s epistemology. (...)
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  5. added 2016-06-13
    J. A. Passmore (2016). Hume's Intentions. Cambridge University Press.
    John Passmore was a renowned Australian empirical philosopher and historian of ideas. In this book, which was originally published in 1952, Passmore's intention was to disentangle certain main themes in Hume's philosophy and to show how they relate to Hume's main philosophic purpose. Rather than offering a detailed commentary, the text provides an account based on specificity and critical scholarship, seeking to complement the other more comprehensive works on Hume's philosophy that had become available around the same time. This book (...)
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  6. added 2016-06-13
    Craig Smith (2016). Matthew B. Arbo, Political Vanity: Adam Ferguson on the Moral Tensions of Early Capitalism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):197-200.
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  7. added 2016-06-13
    Walter Ott (2016). Leibniz on Sensation and the Limits of Reason. History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2):135-153.
    I argue that Leibniz’s doctrine of sensory representation is intended in part to close an explanatory gap in his philosophical system. Unlike the twentieth century explanatory gap, which stretches between neural states on one side and phenomenal character on the other, Leibniz’s gap lies between experiences of secondary qualities like color and taste and the objects that cause them. The problem is that the precise arrangement and distribution of such experiences can never be given a full explanation. In response, Leibniz (...)
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  8. added 2016-06-13
    A. Gelfert, Hume on Curiosity.
  9. added 2016-06-13
    Ryan Pollock & David W. Agler (2016). Hume and Peirce on the Ultimate Stability of Belief. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):245-269.
    Louis Loeb has argued that Hume is pessimistic while Peirce is optimistic about the attainment of fully stable beliefs. In contrast, we argue that Hume was optimistic about such attainment but only if the scope of philosophical investigation is limited to first-order explanatory questions. Further, we argue that Peirce, after reformulating the pragmatic maxim to accommodate the reality of counterfactuals, was pessimistic about such attainment. Finally, we articulate and respond to Peirce's objection that Hume's skeptical arguments in T 1.4.1 and (...)
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  10. added 2016-06-13
    Kirstin April Carlson McPherson, The Secular Transformation of Pride and Humility in the Moral Philosophy of David Hume.
    In this dissertation I examine Hume’s secular re-definition and re-evaluation of the traditional Christian understanding of pride and humility as part of his project to establish a fully secular account of ethics and to undermine what he thought to be the harmful aspects of religious morality. Christians traditionally have seen humility, understood as receptivity to God, to be crucial for individual and social flourishing, and pride as the root of individual and social disorder. By contrast, Hume, who conceives of pride (...)
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  11. added 2016-06-13
    Matias Kimi Slavov, Empiricism and Relationism Intertwined: Hume and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity.
    Einstein acknowledged that his reading of Hume influenced the development of his special theory of relativity. In this article, I juxtapose Hume’s philosophy with Einstein’s philosophical analysis related to his special relativity. I argue that there are two common points to be found in their writings, namely an empiricist theory of ideas and concepts, and a relationist ontology regarding space and time. The main thesis of this article is that these two points are intertwined in Hume and Einstein.
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  12. added 2016-06-13
    Gordon Graham (2016). Leslie Ellen Brown, Artful Virtue: The Interplay of the Beautiful and the Good in the Scottish Enlightenment. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):205-208.
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  13. added 2016-06-13
    Walter Ott (2015). Locke and the Real Problem of Causation. Locke Studies 15:53-77.
    Discussions of John Locke’s theory of causation tend, understandably, to focus on the related notion of power and in particular the dialectic with David Hume. But Locke faces a very different threat, one that is internal to his view. For he argues both that causation is a relation and that relations are not real. The obvious conclusion is intolerable. And yet the premises, I argue, are unassailable. Building on an interpretation of Locke’s treatment of relations I have developed elsewhere, I (...)
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  14. added 2016-06-13
    David Hume (1998). An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Introduction to the work David Hume described as the best of his many writings.
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  15. added 2016-06-11
    Colin McLear (forthcoming). Review of Henry Allison, Kant's Transcendental Deduction. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy.
  16. added 2016-06-11
    Colin McLear (forthcoming). Comments on Lucy Allais, Manifest Reality. [REVIEW] Virtual Critique.
  17. added 2016-06-11
    Colin McLear (2016). Review of Robert Brandom, From Empiricism to Expressivism. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (3):808–816.
  18. added 2016-06-07
    Andrew Moore (2016). Shakespeare Between Machiavelli and Hobbes: Dead Body Politics. Lexington Books.
    Shakespeare between Machiavelli and Hobbes explores Shakespeare’s political outlook by comparing some of the playwright’s best-known works to the works of Italian political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli and English social contract theorist Thomas Hobbes. This ultimately reveals the materialist principles that underpin Shakespeare’s imaginary states.
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  19. added 2016-06-07
    hun CHung (2015). Hobbes’s State of Nature: A Modern Bayesian Game-Theoretic Analysis. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1:485--508.
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  20. added 2016-06-07
    Anna Romani (ed.) (2015). Il riflesso della finzione. Saggi su filosofia e letteratura tra settecento e novecento. ETS.
    Questo volume raccoglie alcune riflessioni sul ruolo della finzione nella letteratura e nella filosofia del Settecento e del Novecento. La premessa del lavoro è di non negare aprioristicamente il valore della multiforme nozione di finzione per il pensiero rigoroso. In tal modo, in un percorso che si dipana da Vico a Queneau passando per Diderot, Rousseau, Gide e Valéry, gli autori indagano diverse esperienze di interazione tra riflessione e finzione, mettendo in luce l’arricchimento per il pensiero che di volta in (...)
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  21. added 2016-06-07
    C. B. Macpherson (2010). The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke. OUP Canada.
    This seminal work by political philosopher C.B. Macpherson was first published by the Clarendon Press in 1962, and remains of key importance to the study of liberal-democratic theory half-a-century later. In it, Macpherson argues that the chief difficulty of the notion of individualism that underpins classical liberalism lies in what he calls its "possessive quality" - "its conception of the individual as essentially the proprietor of his own person or capacities, owing nothing to society for them." Under such a conception, (...)
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  22. added 2016-06-07
    Chris Pierson (2009). Hobbes and Republican Liberty. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):472-474.
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  23. added 2016-06-07
    Gabriella Slomp (2005). Kant's Critique of Hobbes: Sovereignty and Cosmopolitanism. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):83-85.
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  24. added 2016-06-07
    David P. Gauthier (2000). The Logic of Leviathan: The Moral and Political Theory of Thomas Hobbes. OUP Oxford.
    The Logic of Leviathan The Moral and Political Theory of Thomas Hobbes.
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  25. added 2016-06-07
    Tom Sorell (1999). Hobbes-Arg Philosophers. Routledge.
    First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  26. added 2016-06-04
    Manuel Sánchez Rodríguez (2015). Die pragmatische Dimension des Geschmacks im aufgeklärten Bildungsprogramm der Anthropologie Kants. In Patricia Kuark-Leite, Giorgia Cecchinato, Virginia De Araujo Figueiredo, Margit Ruffing & Alice Serra (eds.), Kant and the Metaphors of Reason. Olms Verlag 429-441.
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  27. added 2016-06-02
    James Gordon Finlayson (2016). Where the Right Gets In: On Rawls’s Criticism of Habermas’s Conception of Legitimacy. Kantian Review 21 (2):161-183.
    Many commentators have failed to identify the important issues at the heart of the debate between Habermas and Rawls. This is partly because they give undue attention to differences between Rawlss principle, neither of which is germane to the actual dispute. The dispute is at bottom about how best to conceive of democratic legitimacy. Rawls indicates where the dividing issues lie when he objects that Habermascomprehensive doctrinemorally freestandings mature theory contains conflicting claims about the relation between morality and democratic legitimacy. (...)
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  28. added 2016-06-02
    Lawrence Pasternack (2016). Joachim Aufderheide and Ralf M. Bader , The Highest Good in Aristotle and Kant Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 Pp. 256 ISBN 9780198714019 £45.00. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):318-323.
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  29. added 2016-06-02
    Melissa Zinkin (2016). Making the Ideal Real: Publicity and Morality in Kant. Kantian Review 21 (2):237-259.
    This article discusses the concept of publicity in Kantpublicprivate’ can describe our relations with others, they can be considered to be moral concepts. I argue that we can find in Kant a moral duty not to keep our maxims of action private, or secret. Whereas Korsgaard argues that sometimes in the face of evil it is permissible to sidestep the moral law, I argue that it is rather through publicity that we can deal with evil in the non-ideal world. Moreover, (...)
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  30. added 2016-06-02
    Lucy Allais (2016). Replies to Critics. Kantian Review 21 (2):303-311.
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  31. added 2016-06-02
    Robert B. Louden (2016). Georg Cavallar, Kant’s Embedded Cosmopolitanism: History, Philosophy, and Education for World Citizens Berlin: De Gruyter , 2015 Pp. X + 215 ISBN 9783110438499 $140.00. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):324-329.
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  32. added 2016-06-02
    Hein van den Berg (2016). Bryan Wesley Hall, The Post-Critical Kant: Understanding the Critical Philosophy Through the Opus Postumum New York and London: Routledge, 2015 Pp. X + 220 9781138802148 $145. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):329-333.
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  33. added 2016-06-02
    Paul Guyer (2016). Arguing for Transcendental Idealism: Lucy Allais on Manifest Reality. Kantian Review 21 (2):261-272.
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  34. added 2016-06-02
    Nicholas F. Stang (2016). Appearances and Things in Themselves: Actuality and Identity. Kantian Review 21 (2):283-292.
    Lucy Allais’s anti-phenomenalist interpretation of transcendental idealism is incomplete in two ways. First of all, like some phenomenalists, she is committed to denying the coherence of claims of numerical identity of appearances and things in themselves. Secondly, she fails to explain adequately what grounds the actuality of appearances. This opens the door to a phenomenalist understanding of appearances.
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  35. added 2016-06-02
    Jill Vance Buroker (2016). Lucy Allais, Manifest Reality: Kant’s Idealism and His Realism Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 Pp. Xii + 329 9780198747130 £40.00. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):313-318.
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  36. added 2016-06-02
    Alexandra Newton (2016). Non-Conceptualism and Knowledge in Lucy Allais’s Manifest Reality. Kantian Review 21 (2):273-282.
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  37. added 2016-06-02
    Eric Entrican Wilson (2016). Habitual Desire: On Kant’s Concept of Inclination. Kantian Review 21 (2):211-235.
    Tamar Schapiro has offered an important new account of inclination and motivation, one that expands and refines Christine Korsgaards own view differs significantly from Schapiros view rests on a much sharper distinction between the rational and non-rational parts of the soul. In the process of explaining these differences, I argue that Kants.
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  38. added 2016-06-02
    David Landy (2016). Robert Hanna, Cognition, Content, and the A Priori: A Study in the Philosophy of Mind and Knowledge Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 Pp. 464 ISBN 9780198716297 $99.00. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):333-339.
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  39. added 2016-06-02
    Samuel Stoner (2016). Bradley Murray, The Possibility of Culture: Pleasure and Moral Development in Kant’s Aesthetics Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015 Pp. 160 9781118950654 $99.95. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):340-342.
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  40. added 2016-06-01
    Noam Hoffer (2016). The Relation Between God and the World in the Pre-Critical Kant: Was Kant a Spinozist? Kantian Review 21 (2):185-210.
    Andrew Chignell and Omri Boehm have recently argued that Kant’s pre-Critical proof for the existence of God entails a Spinozistic conception of God and hence substance monism. The basis for this reading is the assumption common in the literature that God grounds possibilities by exemplifying them. In this article I take issue with this assumption and argue for an alternative Leibnizian reading, according to which possibilities are grounded in essences united in God’s mind (later also described as Platonic ideas intuited (...)
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  41. added 2016-05-31
    Megan Gallagher (forthcoming). Fear, Liberty, and Honorable Death in Montesquieu’s Persian Letters. Eighteenth-Century Fiction 28 (4).
    I read Montesquieu’s 'Persian Letters' as an attempt to theorize a liberated alternative to despotic rule. As Montesquieu argues in 'The Spirit of the Laws,' fear—specifically fear of the ruler’s emotional and material excesses—dominates the life of the despotic subject. Although in the 'Letters' the seraglio is the despotic state’s parallel, the seraglio is the site of over owing and barely governed passions. Montesquieu’s solution to the excesses of the seraglio is not the eradication of emotion; rather, he o ers (...)
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  42. added 2016-05-31
    Roger I. Emerson & Mark G. Spencer (2016). A Bibliography for Hume's History of England: A Preliminary View. Hume Studies 40 (1):53-71.
    Hume’s History of England has received a good deal of attention over the years, but no one has ever systematically studied his sources.1 Instead, scholars have worried about Hume’s biases, his portraits of figures like Charles I, and his alleged scorn for mere antiquarianism, which resulted in a readable but superficial history. The most exciting monograph dealing with his History of England in recent years sees it as a step in the process which led to nineteenth-century historicism. Others have seen (...)
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  43. added 2016-05-31
    Mark Alfano (2016). Swanton, Christine. The Virtue Ethics of Hume & Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (4):1120-1124.
    This book has a noble aim: to free virtue ethics from the grip of the neo-Aristotelianism that limits its scope in contemporary Anglophone philosophy. Just as there are deontological views that are not Kant’s or even Kantian, just as there are consequentialist views that are not Bentham’s or even utilitarian, so, Swanton contends, there are viable virtue ethical views that are not Aristotle’s or even Aristotelian. Indeed, the history of both Eastern and Western philosophy suggests that the majority of normative (...)
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  44. added 2016-05-31
    Andreas Kemmerling (2015). The Conceptual Inexhaustibility of Personhood. Tsinghua Studies in Western Philosophy 1 (1):368-399.
    Some leading neuro-scientists recently proclaimed an obviously false view that a human person is his/her brain. This falsity arises partly from the conceptual difficulties concerning personhood/a person. By revealing inexhaustible richness of the characteristics of this concept of a person, this essay explains why the concept is so utterly puzzling. The author contrasts Descartes’ concept of a person with Locke’s. For Descartes, the concept has four features: (1) it is the concept of the mind/body-union; (2) it is innate and a (...)
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  45. added 2016-05-31
    Maurice Finocchiaro (2013). Meta-Argumentation. College Publications.
  46. added 2016-05-30
    Corey W. Dyck (forthcoming). Tetens as a Reader of Kant's Inaugural Dissertation. In Violetta L. Waibel & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Akten des 12. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses “Natur und Freiheit” in Wien vom 21.–25. September 2015.
    In this paper I consider Tetens' reaction to Kant's Inaugural Dissertation in his two most important philosophical works, the essay “Über die allgemeine speculativische Philosophie” of 1775 and the two-volume Philosophische Versuche of 1777. In particular, I focus on Tetens’ critical discussion of Kant's account of the acquisition of concepts of space and time.
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  47. added 2016-05-30
    Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.) (forthcoming). Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self. Oxford University Press.
    Contents: 0. Introduction Anil Gomes and Andrew Stephenson 1. Kant, The Philosophy Of Mind, And Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy Anil Gomes 2. Synthesis And Binding Lucy Allais 3. Understanding Non-Conceptual Representation Of Objects: Empirical Models Of Sensibility’s Operation Katherine Dunlop 4. Are Kantian Intuitions Object-Dependent? Stefanie Grüne 5. Intuition And Presence Colin McLear 6. Imagination And Inner Intuition Andrew Stephenson 7. Inner Sense And Time Ralf M. Bader 8. Can’t Kant Cognize Himself? Or, A Problem For (Almost) Every Interpretation Of (...)
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  48. added 2016-05-30
    Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the meaning (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-29
    Marco Vinícius de Siqueira Côrtes, Origem do sujeito transcendental kantiano. Filosofia Alemã: De Kant a Hegel (Encontro Nacional Anpof).
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  50. added 2016-05-28
    Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Leibniz on Innate Ideas and Kant on the Origin of the Categories. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    In his essay against Eberhard, Kant denies that there are innate concepts. Several scholars take Kant’s statement at face value. They claim that Kant did not endorse concept innatism, that the categories are not innate concepts, and that Kant’s views on innateness are significantly different from Leibniz’s. This paper takes issue with those claims. It argues that Kant’s views on the origin of the intellectual concepts are remarkably similar to Leibniz’s. Given two widespread notions of innateness, the dispositional notion and (...)
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