Search results for 'Curriculum change Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Scott (2007). Critical Essays on Major Curriculum Theorists. Routledge.score: 243.0
    This volume offers a critical appreciation of the work of 16 leading curriculum theorists through critical expositions of their writings. Written by a leading name in Curriculum Studies, the book includes a balance of established curriculum thinkers and contemporary curriculum analysts from education as well as philosophy, sociology and psychology. With theorists from the UK, the US and Europe, there is also a spread of political perspectives from radical conservatism through liberalism to socialism and libertarianism. (...)
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  2. Jane Roland Martin (1994). Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum. Routledge.score: 243.0
    Changing the Educational Landscape is a collection of the best-known and best-loved essays by the renowned feminist philosopher of education, Jane Roland Martin. The volume charts the remarkable intellectual development of a thinker who has travelled distinctively across a changing educational landscape. Trained as an analytic philosopher at a time before women or feminist ideas were welcome in the field, Martin brought a philosopher's detached perspective to her earliest efforts to reconstitute the curriculum. Her later essays on women and (...)
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  3. Patrick Slattery (2006). Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era. Routledge.score: 219.0
    Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era provided the first introduction and analysis of contemporary concepts of curriculum development in relation to postmodernism. It challenged educators to transcend purely traditional approaches to curriculum development and instead incorporate various postmodern discourses into their reflection and action in schools. Since publication in 1995, the curriculum studies field has exploded, the very notion of the postmodern has shifted, and the landscape of American schooling has changed dramatically-federal policies like No Child (...)
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  4. David J. Flinders & Stephen J. Thornton (eds.) (2008). The Curriculum Studies Reader. Routledge.score: 210.0
    This highly anticipated second edition of The Curriculum Studies Reader retains key features of the successful first edition while incorporating an updated introduction and new, timely essays. Grounded in historical essays, the volume provides context for the growing field of curriculum studies, reflects upon the trends that have dominated the field, and samples the best of current scholarship. This thoughtful combination of essays provides a survey of the field coupled with concrete examples of innovative curriculum, and an (...)
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  5. Kathryn M. Benson (2006). Conversations of Curriculum Reform: Students' and Teachers' Voices Interpreted Through Autobiographical and Phenomenological Texts. Peter Lang.score: 201.0
  6. Richard Acland (1967). A Move to the Integrated Curriculum. Exeter, Eng.University of Exeter, Institute of Education.score: 201.0
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  7. Social Change (2006). University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Social Change. Philosophy 9.score: 200.0
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  8. Donald Nathan Levine (2006). Powers of the Mind: The Reinvention of Liberal Learning in America. University of Chicago Press.score: 174.0
    It is one thing to lament the financial pressures put on universities, quite another to face up to the poverty of resources for thinking about what universities should do when they purport to offer a liberal education. In Powers of the Mind, former University of Chicago dean Donald N. Levine enriches those resources by proposing fresh ways to think about liberal learning with ideas more suited to our times. He does so by defining basic values of modernity and then considering (...)
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  9. Ryland Wesley Crary (1969). Humanizing the School. New York, Knopf.score: 174.0
     
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  10. John Elliott (2006). Reflecting Where the Action Is: The Selected Works. Routledge.score: 174.0
    Professor John Elliott has spent the last 30 years researching, thinking and writing about some of the key and enduring issues in Education Research and Action Research. He has contributed over 25 books and 600 articles to the field. In this book, he brings together over 16 of his key writings, in one place. Starting with a specially written Introduction, which gives an overview of Professor Elliott's career and contextualizes his selection, the chapters cover: · Rethinking Educational Research · Doing (...)
     
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  11. Eduardo Giannetti Fonsecdaa (1991). Beliefs in Action: Economic Philosophy and Social Change. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    This book is concerned with the role of economic philosophy ("ideas") in the processes of belief-formation and social change. Its aim is to further our understanding of the behavior of the individual economic agent by bringing to light and examining the function of non-rational dispositions and motivations ("passions") in the determination of the agent's beliefs and goals. Drawing on the work of David Hume and Adam Smith, the book spells out the particular ways in which the passions come (...)
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  12. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Positive Philosophy, Innovative Method and Present Education System. In Abdp (ed.), Applied Philosophy and Ethics.score: 135.0
    Philosophy is an important relation with education as it gives theoretical ground for its development. Principles and values of life learnt through education and experience gives birth to philosophy. Philosophy lays the foundation of leading one’s life based on principles. Education is the source of learning and philosophy it’s applications in human life. While discussing about the real nature of philosophy in present time, we should have a single criteria as if it to be acceptable (...)
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  13. R. J. Martin (1996). Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum. British Journal of Educational Studies 44:221-221.score: 129.0
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  14. Sophie Simec (1953). Philosophical Bases for Human Dignity and Change in Thomistic and American Non-Thomistic Philosophy. Washington, Catholic University of American Press.score: 128.0
     
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  15. Keith Dixon (1972). Philosophy of Education and the Curriculum. New York,Pergamon Press.score: 120.0
     
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  16. C. Ramaiah (1978). The Problem of Change and Identity in Indian Philosophy. Sri Venkateswara University.score: 120.0
     
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  17. John White (2012). The Role of Policy in Philosophy of Education: An Argument and an Illustration. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):503-515.score: 117.0
    The article consists of a general section looking at changes since the 1960s in the links between philosophy of education and policy-making, followed by a specific section engaging in topical policy critique. The historical argument claims that policy involvement was far more widespread in our subject before the mid-1980s than it has been since then, and discusses various reasons for this change. The second section is a close examination of the Expert Panel's December 2011 recommendations on the future (...)
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  18. Andrew Davis (1992). Philosophy of Mathematics Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):121–126.score: 117.0
    This book discusses both the philosophy of mathematics and of mathematics education. The first part is a critique of existing approaches and a new philosophy of mathematics. Chapters include: (1) "A Critique of Absolutist Philosophies of Mathematics," (2) "The Philosophy of Mathematics Reconceptualized," (3) "Social Constructivism as a Philosophy of Mathematics," (4) "Social Constructivism and Subjective Knowledge," and (5) "The Parallels of Social Constructivism." The second part of the book explores the philosophy of mathematics education (...)
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  19. Eleanor M. Rawling (2001). The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000: Issues Arising From a Study of School Geography in England. [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (2):137 - 158.score: 112.0
    A case study of the changing geography curriculum illuminates the continuing struggles over subject knowledge at national level, and highlights more general issues about ideology and the politics of curriculum change 1991-2000. The investigation focuses on the processes and impacts of two National Curriculum Reviews and the changing policy trends and structures becoming apparent under New Labour. Three phrases of curriculum policy-making are tentatively recognised, raising questions for further research.
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  20. Cressida J. Heyes (ed.) (2011). Philosophy and Gender. Routledge.score: 108.0
    How are ‘philosophy’ and ‘gender’ implicated? Throughout history, philosophers—mostly men, though with more women among their number than is sometimes supposed—have often sought to specify and justify the proper roles of women and men, and to explore the political consequences of sexual difference. The last forty years, however, have seen a dramatic explosion of critical thinking about how philosophy is a gendered discipline; there has also been an abundance of philosophical work that uses gender as a central analytic (...)
     
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  21. Lizzy Lewis & Nick Chandley (eds.) (2012). Philosophy for Children Through the Secondary Curriculum. Continuum International Pub. Group.score: 108.0
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) is an approach to learning and teaching that aims to develop reasoning and judgement. Students learn to listen to and respect their peers' opinions, think creatively and work together to develop a deeper understanding of concepts central to their own lives and the subjects they are studying. With the teacher adopting the role of facilitator, a true community develops in which rich and meaningful dialogue results in enquiry of the highest order. Each chapter is written (...)
     
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  22. Charles C. Verharen (2008). A Philosophy Curriculum for Universalized University Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:293-307.score: 102.0
    Focusing on philosophy’s roles in problem solving, this essay proposes a philosophy curriculum for a university “universalized” according to a Cuban model. This model arises from Fidel Castro Ruz’s “dream” that the Cuban nation itself should become a university for its people. The paper’s immediate stimulus was aVenezuelan paper on rural universalized universities at the Havana conference on university education, Universidad 2008. What should be the place of philosophy in a university curriculum for rural students? (...)
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  23. Bongrae Seok (2007). Change, Contradiction, and Overconfidence: Chinese Philosophy and Cognitive Peculiarities of Asians. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (3):221-237.score: 102.0
    This article discusses philosophical influence, especially the influence made by Confucianism and Daoism, on the way Asian people see and understand the world. Recently, Richard Nisbett drew a connection between Chinese philosophy (Confucianism and Daoism) and the cognitive profiles of the people who live in Asian countries where Confucianism and Daoism are strong social and cultural traditions. He argues that there is a peculiar way that Asians think and perceive things and this cognitive pattern is influenced by a group (...)
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  24. Stephen M. Gardiner (2011). Rawls and Climate Change: Does Rawlsian Political Philosophy Pass the Global Test? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):125-151.score: 102.0
    Climate change and other global environmental problems constitute a significant challenge to contemporary political philosophy, especially with respect to complacency. This paper assesses Rawls? theory, and argues for three conclusions. First, Rawls does not already solve such problems, and simple extensions of his theory are unlikely to do so. This is so despite the rich structure of Rawls? philosophy, and the appeal of some of its parts. Second, the most promising areas for extension ? the circumstances of (...)
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  25. Roger C. Schank (2004). Making Minds Less Well Educated Than Our Own. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 99.0
    In the author's words: "This book is an honest attempt to understand what it means to be educated in today's world." His argument is this: No matter how important science and technology seem to industry or government or indeed to the daily life of people, as a society we believe that those educated in literature, history, and other humanities are in some way better informed, more knowing, and somehow more worthy of the descriptor "well educated." This 19th-century conception of the (...)
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  26. Shannon Nason (2012). &Quot;contingency, Necessity, and Causation in Kierkegaard's Theory of Change&Quot;. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):141-162.score: 96.0
    In this paper I argue that Kierkegaard's theory of change is motivated by a robust notion of contingency. His view of contingency is sharply juxtaposed with a strong notion of absolute necessity. I show that how he understands these notions explains certain of his claims about causation. I end by suggesting a compatibilist interpretation of Kierkegaard's philosophy.
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  27. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen, Meaning Change in the Context of Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy.score: 96.0
    Thomas S. Kuhn claimed that the meanings of scientific terms change in theory changes or in scientific revolutions. In philosophy, meaning change has been taken as the source of a group of problems, such as untranslatability, incommensurability, and referential variance. For this reason, the majority of analytic philosophers have sought to deny that there can be meaning change by focusing on developing a theory of reference that would guarantee referential stability. A number of philosophers have also (...)
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  28. Susan Brower-Toland (2002). Instantaneous Change and the Physics of Sanctification: "Quasi-Aristotelianism" in Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet XV Q. 13. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):19-46.score: 96.0
    In Quodlibet XV q.13, Henry of Ghent considers whether the Virgin Mary was immaculately conceived. He argues that she was not, but rather possessed sin only at the first instant of her existence. Because Henry’s defense of this position involves an elaborate discussion of motion and mutation, his discussion marks an important contribution to medieval discussions of Aristotelian natural philosophy. In fact, a number of scholars have identified Henry’s discussion as the source of an unusual fourteenth-century theory of (...) referred to as “quasi-Aristotelianism” (so-called because the account purports to be Aristotelian but is not). My aim in the paper is two-fold: first, to show that Henry's position is not quasi-Aristotelian in the sense that scholars have supposed; second, to show that, even so, his discussion in q. 13 does involve a novel interpretation of Aristotle’s account of instantaneous change. (shrink)
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  29. Till Grüne-Yanoff (2014). Teaching Philosophy of Science to Scientists: Why, What and How. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (1):115-134.score: 96.0
    This paper provides arguments to philosophers, scientists, administrators and students for why science students should be instructed in a mandatory, custom-designed, interdisciplinary course in the philosophy of science. The argument begins by diagnosing that most science students are taught only conventional methodology: a fixed set of methods whose justification is rarely addressed. It proceeds by identifying seven benefits that scientists incur from going beyond these conventions and from acquiring abilities to analyse and evaluate justifications of scientific methods. It concludes (...)
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  30. Regina Cochrane (2014). Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice. Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.score: 96.0
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature (...)
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  31. Georgina Stewart (2011). The Extra Strand of the Māori Science Curriculum. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1175-1182.score: 96.0
    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Pūtaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an ‘extra strand’ covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this strand be taught by means of narratives (i.e. using ‘narrative pedagogy’) in order to avoid a superficial didacticism that succumbs to the traditional notion of science (...)
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  32. C. Lynn Jenks (2004). Missing Links in the Public School Curriculum: Four Dimensions for Change. World Futures 60 (3):195 – 216.score: 96.0
    Our society is changing at a pace hardly imagined a century, even a few decades ago. The role of education is crucial in helping prepare our young people to both cope with and take responsibility for shaping these changes in ways consistent with the values of a free society. To this end, four overarching themes for change in curriculum are examined: (1) the competencies and attitudes needed to understand and engage in systems thinking; (2) the development of (...)
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  33. Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.) (2013). Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP USA.score: 96.0
    Why are professional philosophers today still overwhelmingly male? Often it is assumed that women need to change to fit existing institutions. This book instead offers concrete reflections on the way in which philosophy needs to change to benefit from the important contribution women's full participation makes to the discipline.
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  34. J. Wesley Null (2007). Curriculum for Teachers: Four Traditions Within Pedagogical Philosophy. Educational Studies 42 (1):43-63.score: 96.0
    This article draws upon the history of teacher education to provide an introduction to 4 competing pedagogical philosophies. These 4 philosophies battled for control over curriculum for teachers during the period from 1890 to 1930. I begin by defining curriculum for teachers to include the liberal, the professional, and the experiential dimensions. Then, I identify 4 interest groups that sought to gain power over curriculum for teachers. I categorize these interest groups as the traditionalists, the integrationists, the (...)
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  35. Jon Elster (1983). Explaining Technical Change: A Case Study in the Philosophy of Science. Universitetsforlaget.score: 90.0
    In this volume, first published in 1983, Jon Elster approaches the study of technical change from an epistemological perspective.
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  36. David Kennedy (2014). Neoteny, Dialogic Education and an Emergent Psychoculture: Notes on Theory and Practice. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (1):100-117.score: 90.0
    This article argues that children represent one vanguard of an emergent shift in Western subjectivity, and that adult-child dialogue, especially in the context of schooling, is a key locus for the epistemological change that implies. Following Herbert Marcuse's invocation of a ‘new sensibility’, the author argues that the evolutionary phenomenon of neoteny—the long formative period of human childhood and the pedomorphic character of humans across the life cycle—makes of the adult-collective of school a primary site for the reconstruction of (...)
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  37. Tim Mulgan (2013). The Future of Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 44 (3):241-253.score: 90.0
    In this article the editor of the Philosophical Quarterly briefly outlines the editorial process at that journal; explains why it is foolhardy to attempt to predict the future of philosophy; and, finally, attempts such a prediction. Drawing on his recent book Ethics for a Broken World, he argues that climate change, or some other disaster, may lead to a broken world where the optimistic assumptions underlying contemporary philosophy no longer apply. He argues that the possibility of a (...)
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  38. Clara Fischer (2014). Gendered Readings of Change: A Feminist-Pragmatist Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
    In Gendered Readings of Change, Clara Fischer develops a unique theory of change by drawing on American philosophy and contemporary feminist thought. Via a select history of ancient Greek and Pragmatist philosophies of change, she argues for a reconstruction of transformation that is inclusive of women's experiences and thought. With wide-ranging analysis, this book addresses ontological, moral, epistemological, and political questions, and includes an insightful exploration of the philosophies of Parmenides, Aristotle, John Dewey, Iris Young, and (...)
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  39. Muhammed Haron (2014). South[Ern] Africa's Dar Ul-'Ulums: Institutions of Social Change for the Common Good? Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (3):251-266.score: 90.0
    Muslim communities in principally non-Muslim nation states (e.g. South Africa, United States of America, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands) established a plethora of Muslim theological institutions. They have done so with the purpose of educating and reinforcing their Muslim identity. These educational structures have given rise to numerous questions that one encounters as one explores the rationale for their formation. Some are: have these institutions contributed towards the growth of Muslim extremism as argued by American and European Think Tanks? (...)
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  40. Kathleen Kuiper (ed.) (2010). The Ideas That Change the World: The Essential Guide to Modern Philosophy, Science, Math, and the Arts. Fall River Press/Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.score: 90.0
    The biological sciences -- Mathematics and the physical sciences -- The arts -- The social sciences, philosophy, and religion -- Politics and the law.
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  41. Masaharu Mizumoto (2011). A Theory of Knowledge and Belief Change - Formal and Experimental Perspectives. Hokkaido University Press.score: 90.0
    This work explores the conceptual and empirical issues of the concept of knowledge and its relation to the pattern of our belief change, from formal and experimental perspectives. Part I gives an analysis of knowledge (called Sustainability) that is formally represented and naturalistically plausible at the same time, which is claimed to be a synthesized view of knowledge, covering not only empirical knowledge, but also knowledge of future, practical knowledge, mathematical knowledge, knowledge of general facts. Part II tries to (...)
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  42. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):381-408.score: 86.0
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, (...)
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  43. Bela Szabados & Eldon Soifer (1999). Hypocrisy, Change of Mind, and Weakness of Will: How to Do Moral Philosophy with Examples. Metaphilosophy 30 (1&2):60-78.score: 84.0
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  44. Derek Malone-France (2008). Composition Pedagogy and the Philosophy Curriculum. Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):59-86.score: 84.0
    This essay extends the recent trend toward greater emphasis on writing-related pedagogical practices in introductory philosophy courses to upper-division courses, providing a holistic model for course design that centers on certain techniques and practices that have been developed in the context of the new wave of multidisciplinary writing programs in the United States. I argue that instructors can more effectively teach philosophy and encourage philosophical thinking by incorporating the methods of writing instruction into their courses in systematic ways (...)
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  45. William A. Reid (1979). Schools, Teachers, and Curriculum Change: The Moral Dimension of Theory-Building. Educational Theory 29 (4):325-336.score: 84.0
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  46. Iain Adamson (1972). Teachers' Centres and Curriculum Change. Journal of Moral Education 2 (1):77-80.score: 84.0
  47. Jovan Arandjelovic (2003). Can Philosophy Contribute to a Change of Ethos? (The Road From the Law of the Ethos Toward European Law. Filozofija I Drustvo 21:117-135.score: 84.0
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  48. Lois Duffee & Glen Aikenhead (1992). Curriculum Change, Student Evaluation, and Teacher Practical Knowledge. Science Education 76 (5):493-506.score: 84.0
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  49. John M. Rogan (2007). How Much Curriculum Change is Appropriate? Defining a Zone of Feasible Innovation. Science Education 91 (3):439-460.score: 84.0
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  50. Michael F. D. Young (1975). Curriculum Change: Limits and Possibilities. Educational Studies 1 (2):129-138.score: 84.0
    * This paper was originally given as one of the Doris Lee Lectures on February 20th 1975, at the University of London Institute of Education.
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