Search results for 'Human ecology History' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Michael Tobias (1985). After Eden: History, Ecology, and Conscience. Avant Books.score: 94.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Bram Tucker & Lisa Rende Taylor (2007). The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues. Human Nature 18 (3):181-189.score: 90.0
    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.) (1993). Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge.score: 84.0
    The book creates a framework for a cohesive discourse, for a "new human ecology".
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Terry L. Yates, James N. Mills, Cheryl A. Parmenter, Thomas G. Ksiazek, Robert R. Parmenter, John R. Vande Castle, Charles H. Calisher, Stuart T. Nichol, Kenneth D. Abbott & Joni C. Young (2002). The Ecology and Evolutionary History of an Emergent Disease: Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Evidence From Two El Niño Episodes in the American Southwest Suggests That El Niño–Driven Precipitation, the Initial Catalyst of a Trophic Cascade That Results in a Delayed Density-Dependent Rodent Response, is Sufficient to Predict Heightened Risk for Human Contraction of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome. Bioscience 52 (11):989-998.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Bock & Sara E. Johnson (2004). Subsistence Ecology and Play Among the Okavango Delta Peoples of Botswana. Human Nature 15 (1):63-81.score: 78.0
    Children’s play is widely believed by educators and social scientists to have a training function that contributes to psychosocial development as well as the acquisition of skills related to adult competency in task performance. In this paper we examine these assumptions from the perspective of life-history theory using behavioral observation and household economic data collected among children in a community in the Okavango Delta of Botswana where people engage in mixed subsistence regimes of dry farming, foraging, and herding.We hypothesize (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.score: 77.0
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 76.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 75.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Michael Gurven (2004). To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.score: 71.0
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. A. Terry Rambo (1983). Conceptual Approaches to Human Ecology. East-West Environment and Policy Institute.score: 70.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 67.0
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...) beings. All these associations were well aware of the crimes by medicine, in particular by the accused Nazi physicians at the Nuremberg Doctors Trial (1946/47, sentence: August 1947). During the first conference of the World Medical Association (September 1947) issues of medical ethics played a major role: and a new document was drafted concerning the values of the medical profession. After the catastrophe of the War and the criminal activities of scientists, the late 1940s saw increased scrutiny paid to fundamental questions of human rights and medical ethics, which are still highly relevant for today’s medicine and morality. The article focuses on the development of medical ethics and human rights reflected in the statement of important persons, codes and institutions in the field. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert Waller (1973). Be Human or Die. London,C. Knight.score: 67.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mary C. Towner (2001). Linking Dispersal and Resources in Humans. Human Nature 12 (4):321-349.score: 66.0
    Competition for resources is one of the main evolutionary explanations for dispersal from the natal area. For humans this explanation has received little attention, despite the key role dispersal is thought to play in shaping social systems. I examine the link between dispersal and resources using historical data on people from the small farming town of Oakham, Massachusetts (1750–1850). I reconstruct individual life histories through a variety of records, identifying dispersers, their age at dispersal, and their destinations. I find that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Kim Sterelny, Review Genes, Memes and Human History.score: 63.0
    Archaeology, of all the human sciences, can dodge this problem the least, and the great virtue of Shennan’s Genes, Memes and Human History is that he confronts it directly. For though humans are now both cultural and ecological beings, it was not always so. Once our hominid ancestors had a social organisation and a material culture roughly equivalent to that of today’s chimpanzees. Chimps are not encultured in the sense that we are encultured: their social life and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). So You Think You're Human?: A Brief History of Humankind. Oxford University Press.score: 63.0
    So You Think You're Human? confronts these problems from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Kevin MacDonald (1997). Life History Theory and Human Reproductive Behavior. Human Nature 8 (4):327-359.score: 63.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Tamara Giles-Vernick (2002). Cutting the Vines of the Past: Environmental Histories of the Central African Rain Forest. University Press of Virginia.score: 61.0
    Cutting the Vines of the Past offers a novel argument: African ways of seeing and interpreting their environments and past are not only critical to how ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mary K. Shenk & Siobhán M. Mattison (2011). The Rebirth of Kinship. Human Nature 22 (1-2):1-15.score: 61.0
    Kinship was one of the key areas of research interest among anthropologists in the nineteenth century, one of the most hotly debated areas of theory in the early and mid-twentieth century, and yet an area of waning interest by the end of the twentieth century. Since then, the study of kinship has experienced a revitalization, with concomitant disputes over how best to proceed. This special issue brings together recent studies of kinship by scientific anthropologists employing evolutionary theory and quantitative methods. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Whitney Bauman (2009). Theology, Creation, and Environmental Ethics: From Creatio Ex Nihilo to Terra Nullius. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Introduction : points of departure -- A genealogy of the Christian colonial mindset : ex nihilo from disputed beginnings to orthodox origins -- Ex nihilo and the origin of an empire -- Ex nihilo, erasure and discovery? -- The cogito, ex nihilo, and the legacy of John Locke -- The creation ex nihilo of terra nullius lands : omnipotent nations and the logic of global-colonization -- From epistemologies of domination to grounded thinking -- Opening words about God onto creatio continua (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Roger Smith (1997). History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice? History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):22-39.score: 60.0
    This paper discusses the historical voice in the history of the human sci ences. I address the question, 'Who speaks?', as a question about disci plinary identities and conventions of writing - identities and conventions which have the appearance of conditions of knowledge, in an area of activity where academic history and the history of science or intellectual history meet. If, as this paper contends, the subject-matter of the history of the human sciences (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Dominick LaCapra (2009). History and its Limits: Human, Animal, Violence. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
    Introduction For Freud, beyond the explanatory limits of the pleasure principle lay the repetition compulsion, the death drive, and trauma with its ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Richard J. Chacon & Ruben G. Mendoza (eds.) (2012). The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare. Springer.score: 60.0
    This work documents the ethical dilemmas faced by anthropologists and researchers in general when investigating Amerindian communities.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.score: 60.0
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Daniel Nettle, Rebecca Coyne & Agathe Colléony (2012). No Country for Old Men. Human Nature 23 (4):375-385.score: 60.0
    Within affluent societies, people who grow up in deprived areas begin reproduction much earlier than their affluent peers, and they display a number of other behaviors adapted to an environment in which life will be short. The psychological mechanisms regulating life-history strategies may be sensitive to the age profile of the people encountered during everyday activities. We hypothesized that this age profile might differ between environments of different socioeconomic composition. We tested this hypothesis with a simple observational study comparing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. José María G. Gómez-Heras (2010). En Armonía Con la Naturaleza: Reconstrucción Medioambiental de la Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.score: 58.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Simon Evnine (1993). Hume, Conjectural History, and the Uniformity of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):589-606.score: 57.0
    In this paper I argue that, in at least two cases - his discussions of the temporal precedence o f polytheism over monotheism and of the origins of civil society - we see Hume consigning to historical development certain aspects of reason which, as a comparison with Locke will show, have sometimes been held to be uniform. In the first of these cases Hume has recourse to claims about the general historical development of human thought. In the second case, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Catherine Driscoll (2009). Grandmothers, Hunters and Human Life History. Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):665-686.score: 56.0
    This paper critiques the competing “Grandmother Hypothesis” and “Embodied Capital Theory” as evolutionary explanations of the peculiarities of human life history traits. Instead, I argue that the correct explanation for human life history probably involves elements of both hypotheses: long male developmental periods and lives probably evolved due to group selection for male hunting via increased female fertility, and female long lives due to the differential contribution women’s complex foraging skills made to their children and grandchildren’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. A. Marshall (1998). A Postmodern Natural History of the World: Eviscerating the GUTs From Ecology and Environmentalism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):137-164.score: 56.0
    Postmodernism was not launched by the development of Warholesque pop art in the 1960s, nor was it initiated by the explosive destruction of the Pruitt-Igoe modern housing project of St Louis, Missouri in 1972, or by the commissioning of Jean-Francois Lyotard's work on knowledge in advanced societies by the Quebec government in the late 1970s. Postmodernism began with the publication of a paper entitled `The individualistic concept of plant the association' in 1926 by the plant ecologist Henry Gleason. If we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Flor Ángela Tobón & López Giraldo (2013). Psychosocial accompaniment from human ecology toyoung marginalized people to prevent drug dependence. Humanidades Médicas 13 (2):348-371.score: 56.0
    Introducción: Se presenta un análisis cualitativo del acompañamiento psicosocial a jóvenes en condiciones de vulnerabilidad desde la ecología humana durante 12 meses entre 2010 a 2011; utilizando técnicas pedagógicas evaluativas participativas. Éstas, son una alternativa para crear espacios reflexivos con el propósito de potenciar la resiliencia en las relaciones comunicativas y formar en el respeto. Objetivo: Generar bienestar, prevenir la farmacodependencia y contribuir a la promoción de la salud. Material y Métodos: Se revisaron los antecedentes temáticos, fueron seleccionados 100 estudiantes (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. S. Boyden (1993). Human Ecology and Biohistory: Conceptual Approaches to Understanding Human Situation in the Biosphere. In Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.), Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge.score: 56.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Roderick J. Lawrence (1993). Can Human Ecology Provide an Integrative Framework? The Contribution of Structuration Theory to Contemporary Debate. In Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.), Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge. 213--228.score: 56.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Richard York & Philip Mancus (2009). Critical Human Ecology: Historical Materialism and Natural Laws. Sociological Theory 27 (2):122 - 149.score: 56.0
    We lay the foundations for a critical human ecology (CHE) that combines the strengths of the biophysical human ecology tradition in environmental sociology with those of historical materialism. We show the strengths of a critically informed human ecology by addressing four key meta-theoretical issues: materialist versus idealist approaches in the social sciences, dialectical versus reductionist analyses, the respective importance of historical and ahistorical causal explanations, and the difference between structural and functional interpretations of phenomena. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jia-cai Zhang & Hui Yan (2008). A New Environmental Philosophy and The Re-Establishing of Human Ecology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:169-174.score: 56.0
    Environment is essentially in the category of culture and environmental research should be based on human value and culture. The study of the relationship between humans and their natural environment should also refer to human relations. Since the operational logic of social capital is the root of ecological crisis, the ultimate solution to this problem lies in human’s correct thinking, institutional, political and behavioral patterns in dealing with nature. Re-establishing human ecology therefore provides a cultural (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Pietro Gori (2009). “Sounding Out Idols”: Knowledge, History and Metaphysics in Human, All Too Human and Twilight of the Idols. In Volker Gerhard & Renate Reschke (eds.), Nietzscheforschung, vol. 16.score: 54.0
    Twilight of the Idols has a main role in Nietzsche’s work, since it represents the opening writing of his project of Transvaluation of all values. The task of this essay is sounding out idols, i.e. to disclose their lack of content, their being hollow. The theme of eternal idols is in this work strictly related to the idea of a ‘true’ world and, consequently, a study on this latter notion can contribute to a better comprehension of what does that emptiness (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Arthur Marwick (2004/2007). A History of Human Beauty. Hambledon and London.score: 54.0
    Physical attractiveness has always had a large effect on personal success, social standing, and behavior. In It , Arthur Marwick observes beauty as a possessed quality as important to ones fate as intelligence, strength, wealth, education, or family. From royal mistresses and ancient queens to modern film stars and politicians, Marwick looks at the potent influence appearance has had on history and human fate.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Arthur Marwick (2004/2007). It: A History of Human Beauty. Hambledon and London.score: 54.0
    Physical attractiveness has always had a large effect on personal success, social standing, and behavior. In It , Arthur Marwick observes beauty as a possessed quality as important to ones fate as intelligence, strength, wealth, education, or family. From royal mistresses and ancient queens to modern film stars and politicians, Marwick looks at the potent influence appearance has had on history and human fate.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. R. G. Collingwood (1936). Human Nature and Human History. London, H. Milford.score: 54.0
    This paper presents evidence and arguments against an interpretation of david Hume's idea of history which insists that he held to a static conception of human nature. This interpretation presumes that hume lacks a genuine historical perspective, and that consequently his notion of historiography contains a fallacy (viz., Of the universal man). It is shown here that this interpretation overlooks an important distinction between methodological and substantive uniformity in hume's discussion of human nature and action. When this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Furio Di Paola (1988). Human-Oriented and Machine-Oriented Reasoning: Remarks on Some Problems in the History of Automated Theorem Proving. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (2):121-131.score: 54.0
    Examples in the history of Automated Theorem Proving are given, in order to show that even a seemingly ‘mechanical’ activity, such as deductive inference drawing, involves special cultural features and tacit knowledge. Mechanisation of reasoning is thus regarded as a complex undertaking in ‘cultural pruning’ of human-oriented reasoning. Sociological counterparts of this passage from human- to machine-oriented reasoning are discussed, by focusing on problems of man-machine interaction in the area of computer-assisted proof processing.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Dan Flores (forthcoming). Nature's Children: Environmental History as Human Natural History. Human/Nature: Biology, Culture, and Environmental History.score: 54.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Norman M. Ford (1988). When Did I Begin?: Conception of the Human Individual in History, Philosophy, and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral, and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. Following a detailed analysis of the history of the question, Reverend Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Giorgio Manzi & Fabio Di Vincenzo (2013). Light Has Been Thrown (on Human Origins): a Brief History of Palaeoanthropology, with Notes on the "Punctuated" Origin of Homo Sapiens. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):31-48.score: 54.0
    “Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history”: this was the single line that Charles Darwin devoted to human evolution in the Origin of Species (1859). At present, there is a number of extinct species, which we understand to be related to human evolution, demonstrating that the Darwin’s prediction was correct: light has been thrown, indeed. Moreover, the science of human origin (or palaeoanthropology) appears to be able to shed much light not (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Donald E. Brown (1999). Human Nature and History. History and Theory 38 (4):138–157.score: 51.0
    What motivated British colonialism? What motivated renaissance Florentines to finance their state? Why did Brazilian men find mixed-race women so attractive? What promotes falsity in reports of human affairs? Why did historical-mindedness develop in ancient Greece and China, but not India? When homosexual communities developed, why did gay men pursue sexual strategies so different from those of lesbians? Why does a Heian-period Japanese description of fear of snakes sound so familiar to a Westerner? Why have rebels tended to be (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. G. Mitman (2003). Natural History and the Clinic: The Regional Ecology of Allergy in America. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):491-510.score: 51.0
    This paper challenges the presumed triumph of laboratory life in the history of twentieth-century biomedical research through an exploration of the relationships between laboratory, clinic, and field in the regional understanding and treatment of allergy in America. In the early establishment of allergy clinics, many physicians opted to work closely with botanists knowledgeable about the local flora in the region to develop pollen extracts in desensitization treatments, rather than rely upon pharmaceutical companies that had adopted a principle of standardized (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Donna J. Drucker (2012). 'A Most Interesting Chapter in the History of Science' Intellectual Responses to Alfred Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):75-98.score: 51.0
    There were three broad categories of academic responses to Alfred Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (Kinsey, Pomeroy and Martin, 1948): method; findings; and broader reflections on the book’s place in American social life and democracy. This article focuses primarily on archival academic responses to Kinsey’s work that appeared in the year following the book’s publication. Many academics agreed that some aspects of Kinsey’s method were flawed and that his interpretations sometimes overreached his raw data. Nonetheless, they also (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. K. J. Korfiatis & G. P. Stamou (1994). Emergence of New Fields in Ecology: The Case of Life History Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (1):97 - 116.score: 51.0
    We examine the emergence of the field of life-history strategies during the 1950s. (We consider a 'field' an area of scientific activity consisting of a theoretical core, a subject of research, a vocabulary and research tools). During the late 1940s and early 1950s, population ecology faced many problems, concerning its conceptual framework, its mathematical models, experimental deficiencies, etc. Research on life-history characteristics remained descriptive, lacking explanations about the causes and significance of phenomena. This was due to the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. S. K. Wertz (1975). Hume, History, and Human Nature. Journal of the History of Ideas 36:481-496.score: 51.0
    This paper presents evidence and arguments against an interpretation of david Hume's idea of history which insists that he held to a static conception of human nature. This interpretation presumes that hume lacks a genuine historical perspective, and that consequently his notion of historiography contains a fallacy (viz., Of the universal man). It is shown here that this interpretation overlooks an important distinction between methodological and substantive uniformity in hume's discussion of human nature and action. When this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David Boucher (1993). Human Conduct, History, and Social Science in the Works of R. G. Collingwood and Michael Oakeshott. New Literary History 24:697-717.score: 51.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. John C. Burnham (2000). Changing Metaphors in History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):121-124.score: 51.0
    A generation or more ago, as the Cold War flourished, the continental European\nscholars whom I met seemed odd to me. They were, virtually without\nexception, totally preoccupied with whether their scholarship harmonized\nwith Marxism or refuted Marxism. This focus cut across disciplinary lines.\nIndeed, a basic assumption united these colleagues: the scholars’ world,\nwhether Karl Marx or Max Weber, consisted of centralized bureaucracies\nsuitable for socialism or at least for orderly organization.\nNorth American scholars shared with the Europeans, not the preoccupation\nwith Marxism, but the idea that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sharon Krause (2003). History and the Human Soul in Montesquieu. History of Political Thought 24 (2):235-261.score: 51.0
    Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws (1748) illuminates the many factors that affect human behaviour and hence constrain the capacity for self-guided action, but his work also contains a defence of this capacity in his treatment of the soul. Yet Montesquieu also thought it important to establish reliable limits on human action so as to protect political liberty, and he looked to the constitutional traditions of particular peoples for standards of right that would provide effective checks on individuals (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Tjaart W. Schillhorn van Veen (1998). One Medicine: The Dynamic Relationship Between Animal and Human Medicine in History and at Present. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):115-120.score: 51.0
    The relation and collaboration of human and animal medicine had its ups and downs throughout history. The interaction between these two disciplines has been especially fruitful in the broad areas of patho-physiology and of epidemiology. An exploration of the interaction between the two disciplines, using historical and contemporary examples in comparative medicine, zoonoses, zooprophylaxis, and human-animal bond, reveals that a better understanding of animal and human disease, as well as societal changes such as interest in non-conventional (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000