Search results for 'Mechanism (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Nathan Ross (2008). On Mechanism in Hegel's Social and Political Philosophy. Routledge.
    The critique of mechanism in the political philosophy of Herder and German romanticism -- The political function of machine metaphors in Hegel's early writings -- Mechanism in religious practice -- The mechanization of labor and the birth of modern ethicality in Hegel's Jena political writings -- Mechanism and the problem of self-determination in Hegel's logic -- The modern state as absolute mechanism : Hegel's logical insight into the relation of civil society and the state.
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  2.  19
    Lenny Moss (2012). Is the Philosophy of Mechanism Philosophy Enough? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):164-172.
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  3.  2
    Lenny Moss (2012). Is the Philosophy of Mechanism Philosophy Enough? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):164-172.
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  4.  5
    Paola Rumore (forthcoming). Mechanism and Materialism in Early Modern German Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    ABSTRACTThe paper focuses on the gradual separation between materialism and mechanism in early modern German philosophy. In Germany the distinction between the two concepts, originally introduced by Leibniz, was definitively stated by Wolff who was the first to provide a definition of the new philosophical term Materialismus, and of the related philosophical sect. In the first part I describe the initial identification of mechanism and materialism in German philosophy between the last decades of the seventeenth century and 1720. (...)
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  5. Nathan Ross (2013). On Mechanism in Hegel's Social and Political Philosophy. Routledge.
    _On Mechanism in Hegel's Social and Political Philosophy_ examines the role of the concept of mechanism in Hegel’s thinking about political and social institutions. It counters as overly simplistic the notion that Hegel has an ‘organic concept of society’. It examines the thought of Hegel’s peers and predecessors who critique modern political intuitions as ‘machine-like’, focusing on J.G. Herder, Friedrich Schlegel and Novalis. From here it examines the early writings of Hegel, in which Hegel makes a break with (...)
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  6. Robert E. Schofield & Arnold Thackray (1971). Mechanism and Materialism: British Natural Philosophy in the Age of Reason. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (3):297-306.
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  7.  7
    Margaret Dauler Wilson (1999). Ideas and Mechanism Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  8.  1
    P. M. Heimann & Robert E. Schofield (1972). Mechanism and Materialism: British Natural Philosophy in An Age of Reason. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (87):178.
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  9.  1
    Gregor Schiemann (2009). Hermann von Helmholtz's Mechanism: The Loss of Certainty. A Study on the Transition From Classical to Modern Philosophy of Nature. Springer.
    Two seemingly contradictory tendencies have accompanied the development of the natural sciences in the past 150 years. On the one hand, the natural sciences have been instrumental in effecting a thoroughgoing transformation of social structures and have made a permanent impact on the conceptual world of human beings. This histori¬cal period has, on the other hand, also brought to light the merely hypothetical validity of scientific knowledge. As late as the middle of the 19th century the truth-pathos in the natural (...)
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  10.  35
    Richard Tieszen (2006). After Gödel: Mechanism, Reason, and Realism in the Philosophy of Mathematics. Philosophia Mathematica 14 (2):229-254.
    In his 1951 Gibbs Lecture Gödel formulates the central implication of the incompleteness theorems as a disjunction: either the human mind infinitely surpasses the powers of any finite machine or there exist absolutely unsolvable diophantine problems (of a certain type). In his later writings in particular Gödel favors the view that the human mind does infinitely surpass the powers of any finite machine and there are no absolutely unsolvable diophantine problems. I consider how one might defend such a view in (...)
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  11.  21
    Kevin E. Dodson (1994). Teleology and Mechanism in Kant's Philosophy of History. Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (1):157-165.
  12.  10
    Robert Ackermann (1968). Mechanism and the Philosophy of Biology. Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):143-151.
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  13.  7
    Patrick R. Frierson (2000). Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):125-126.
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  14. Eileen A. O'neill (1983). Mind and Mechanism: An Examination of Some Mind-Body Problems in Descartes' Philosophy. Dissertation, Princeton University
    This thesis examines some mind-body problems traditionally ascribed to Descartes' philosophy. One such problem focuses on inconsistencies in Descartes' general causal claims. Another problem, first put forward by Simon Foucher, concerns Descartes' purported espousal of the following inconsistent triad: mind-body causal interaction, mind-body distinctness, and "the causal likeness principle." The final problem is one regarding free will and determinism. ;In the first Chapter I examine the content and number of Descartes' causal principles. An analysis of the main concepts used in (...)
     
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  15. M. Rozemond (2001). Margaret Dauler Wilson: Ideas and Mechanism. Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):167-169.
     
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  16.  60
    Carl Gillett (2007). A Mechanist Manifesto for the Philosophy of Mind: A Third Way for Functionalists. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:21-42.
    One of the main early forms of “functionalism,” developed by writers like Jerry Fodor and William Lycan, focused on “mechanistic” explanation in the special sciences and argued that “functional properties” in psychology were continuous in nature with the special science properties posited in such mechanistic explanations. I dub the latter position“Continuity Functionalism” and use it to critically examine the “Standard Picture” of the metaphysics of functionalism which takes “functional” properties to be second-order properties and claims there are two metaphysical forms (...)
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  17.  22
    Carl Gillett (2008). A Mechanist Manifesto for the Philosophy of Mind. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:21-42.
    One of the main early forms of “functionalism,” developed by writers like Jerry Fodor and William Lycan, focused on “mechanistic” explanation in the special sciences and argued that “functional properties” in psychology were continuous in nature with the special science properties posited in such mechanistic explanations. I dub the latter position“Continuity Functionalism” and use it to critically examine the “Standard Picture” of the metaphysics of functionalism which takes “functional” properties to be second-order properties and claims there are two metaphysical forms (...)
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  18.  7
    Michael Morris (2008). Review of Nathan Ross, On Mechanism in Hegel's Social and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
  19. Arthur W. Burks & Merrilee H. Salmon (1990). The Philosophy of Logical Mechanism Essays in Honor of Arthur W. Burks, with His Responses ; with a Bibliography of Works of Arthur W. Burks.
     
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  20. Stillman Drake (1971). Mechanism and Materialism. British Natural Philosophy in an Age of Reason by Robert E. Schofield. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 62:259-260.
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  21. J. E. McGuire (1971). Eighteenth Century Mechanism and Materialism. British Natural Philosophy in an Age of Reason. By Robert E. Schofield. Princeton University Press & Oxford University Press. 1970. Pp. Vi + 336. £4.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (4):418.
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  22. J. E. Mcguire (1971). Mechanism and Materialism. British Natural Philosophy in an Age of Reason. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (4):418-419.
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  23. Francis A. Shoup (1892). Mechanism and Personality: An Outline of Philosophy in the Light of the Latest Scientific Research. Philosophical Review 1 (1):101-102.
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  24.  22
    Gary Hatfield (2016). The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680–1760. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):181-185.
    Review of: Stephen Gaukroger: The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680-1760. Oxford: Clarendon, 2010, pp. ix+505. £47.00 (hb). ISBN 9780199594931. This volume is the second of a projected six-volume work on the shaping of modern cognitive values through the emergence of a scientific culture, a phenomenon that Gaukroger takes to be specific to the West. The volume ranges from Newton’s initial publications on optics to the French Enlightenment and the publication (...)
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  25. Nigel Stepp, Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel’s (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of nonrepresentational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp & Turvey, 2009). We then propose a philosophy of science appropriate to nonrepresentational, dynamical (...)
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  26. Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel's (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically-oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of non-representational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp and Turvey 2009). We then propose a philosophy of science appropriate to non-representational, dynamical cognitive (...)
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  27.  53
    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that (...)
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  28.  5
    Sylvia Berryman (2009). The Mechanical Hypothesis in Ancient Greek Natural Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this 2009 book Sylvia Berryman challenges that assumption, arguing that the idea that the world works 'like a machine' can be found in ancient Greek thought, predating the early modern philosophy with which it is most closely associated.
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  29.  27
    Lindley Darden (2006). Reasoning in Biological Discoveries: Essays on Mechanisms, Interfield Relations, and Anomaly Resolution. Cambridge University Press.
    Reasoning in Biological Discoveries brings together a series of essays which focus on one of the most heavily debated topics of scientific discovery today. Collected together and richly illustrated for the first time in this edition, Darden's essays represent a ground-breaking foray into one of the major problems facing scientists and philosophers of science. Divided into three sections, the essays focus on broad themes, notably historical and philosophical issues at play in discussions of biological mechanism; and the problem of (...)
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  30. Pietro Gori (2014). Nietzsche and Mechanism. On the Use of History for Science. In Helmut Heit & Lisa Heller (eds.), Handbuch Nietzsche und die Wissenschaften. De Gruyter 119-137.
    This paper is devoted to a comparison between Ernst Mach's and Friedrich Nietzsche's anti-metaphysical approach to scientific and philosophical concepts. By making reference to Mach’s early essay on the conservation of energy (Die Geschichte und die Wurzel des Satzes von der Erhaltung der Arbeit, 1872), I argue that Nietzsche shares with him the idea that the concepts we adopt are only useful fictions developed during the history of humankind and its culture. This idea is fundamental for the development of modern (...)
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  31. W. J. Talbott (1990). The Reliability of the Cognitive Mechanism: A Mechanist Account of Empirical Justification. Garland.
    First Published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  32.  22
    Antonia LoLordo (2012). John Locke & Natural Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):296-297.
  33.  7
    Bertold Schweitzer (2015). From Malfunction to Mechanism. Philosophia Scientiæ 19 (1):21-34.
    Le dysfonctionnement, la défectuosité et les erreurs sont des phénomènes qui peuvent aider à mieux comprendre les entités affectées par ces incidents. L’analyse approfondie du fonctionnement et du dysfonctionnement facilite en particulier la découverte, l’explication et la modélisation théorique des structures, fonctions et mécanismes propres à un système. Dans certains cas, les dysfonctionnements sont le seul moyen d’accéder aux processus internes d’un certain système. Le présent essai analyse les méthodes de diverses disciplines tenant compte de dysfonctionnements tels que les mutations, (...)
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  34. Robert E. Schofield (1969). Mechanism and Materialism. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
  35. William Bechtel (2009). Constructing a Philosophy of Science of Cognitive Science. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):548-569.
    Philosophy of science is positioned to make distinctive contributions to cognitive science by providing perspective on its conceptual foundations and by advancing normative recommendations. The philosophy of science I embrace is naturalistic in that it is grounded in the study of actual science. Focusing on explanation, I describe the recent development of a mechanistic philosophy of science from which I draw three normative consequences for cognitive science. First, insofar as cognitive mechanisms are information-processing mechanisms, cognitive science needs an account of (...)
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  36.  48
    Michael Detlefsen (2002). Löb's Theorem as a Limitation on Mechanism. Minds and Machines 12 (3):353-381.
    We argue that Löb's Theorem implies a limitation on mechanism. Specifically, we argue, via an application of a generalized version of Löb's Theorem, that any particular device known by an observer to be mechanical cannot be used as an epistemic authority (of a particular type) by that observer: either the belief-set of such an authority is not mechanizable or, if it is, there is no identifiable formal system of which the observer can know (or truly believe) it to be (...)
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  37. Jeremy Howick, Ashley Graham Kennedy & Alexander Mebius, Philosophy of Evidence Based Medicine (Oxford Bibliography: Http://Www.Oxfordbibliographies.Com/View/Document/Obo-9780195396577/Obo-9780195396577-0253.Xml). Oxford Bibliography.
    Since its introduction just over two decades ago, evidence-based medicine (EBM) has come to dominate medical practice, teaching, and policy. There are a growing number of textbooks, journals, and websites dedicated to EBM research, teaching, and evidence dissemination. EBM was most recently defined as a method that integrates best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values and circumstances in the treatment of patients. There have been debates throughout the early 21st century about what counts as good research evidence between (...)
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  38. Marcus P. Adams (2014). The Wax and the Mechanical Mind: Reexamining Hobbes's Objections to Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):403-424.
    Many critics, Descartes himself included, have seen Hobbes as uncharitable or even incoherent in his Objections to the Meditations on First Philosophy. I argue that when understood within the wider context of his views of the late 1630s and early 1640s, Hobbes's Objections are coherent and reflect his goal of providing an epistemology consistent with a mechanical philosophy. I demonstrate the importance of this epistemology for understanding his Fourth Objection concerning the nature of the wax and contend that Hobbes's brief (...)
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  39.  6
    Charles T. Wolfe & Christoffer Basse Eriksen (2016). Review of S. Gaukroger, The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility. [REVIEW] Intellectual History Review 27.
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  40. Daniel J. Nicholson (2012). The Concept of Mechanism in Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):152-163.
    The concept of mechanism in biology has three distinct meanings. It may refer to a philosophical thesis about the nature of life and biology (‘mechanicism’), to the internal workings of a machine-like structure (‘machine mechanism’), or to the causal explanation of a particular phenomenon (‘causal mechanism’). In this paper I trace the conceptual evolution of ‘mechanism’ in the history of biology, and I examine how the three meanings of this term have come to be featured in (...)
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  41. William Bechtel (2005). Explanation: A Mechanist Alternative. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biol and Biomed Sci 36 (2):421--441.
    Explanations in the life sciences frequently involve presenting a model of the mechanism taken to be responsible for a given phenomenon. Such explanations depart in numerous ways from nomological explanations commonly presented in philosophy of science. This paper focuses on three sorts of differences. First, scientists who develop mechanistic explanations are not limited to linguistic representations and logical inference; they frequently employ dia- grams to characterize mechanisms and simulations to reason about them. Thus, the epistemic resources for presenting mechanistic (...)
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  42. Alexander Mebius (2014). A Weakened Mechanism Is Still A Mechanism: On the Causal Role of Absences in Mechanistic Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 45 (1):43-48.
    Much contemporary debate on the nature of mechanisms centers on the issue of modulating negative causes. One type of negative causability, which I refer to as “causation by absence,” appears difficult to incorporate into modern accounts of mechanistic explanation. This paper argues that a recent attempt to resolve this problem, proposed by Benjamin Barros, requires improvement as it overlooks the fact that not all absences qualify as sources of mechanism failure. I suggest that there are a number of additional (...)
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  43.  94
    Joyce C. Havstad (2011). Problems for Natural Selection as a Mechanism. Philosophy of Science 78 (3):512-523.
    Skipper and Millstein analyze natural selection and mechanism, concluding that natural selection is not a mechanism in the sense of the new mechanistic philosophy. Barros disagrees and provides his own account of natural selection as a mechanism. This discussion identifies a missing piece of Barros's account, attempts to fill in that piece, and reconsiders the revised account. Two principal objections are developed: one, the account does not characterize natural selection; two, the account is not mechanistic. Extensive and (...)
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  44.  70
    Marij van Strien (2013). The Nineteenth Century Conflict Between Mechanism and Irreversibility. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):191-205.
    The reversibility problem (better known as the reversibility objection) is usually taken to be an internal problem in the kinetic theory of gases, namely the problem of how to account for the second law of thermodynamics within this theory. Historically, it is seen as an objection that was raised against Boltzmann's kinetic theory of gases, which led Boltzmann to a statistical approach to the kinetic theory, culminating in the development of statistical mechanics. In this paper, I show that in the (...)
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  45.  59
    Ting-Chao Chou (2008). A New Look at the Ancient Asian Philosophy Through Modern Mathematical and Topological Scientific Analysis. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:21-39.
    The unified theory of dose and effect, as indicated by the median-effect equation for single and multiple entities and for the first and higher order kinetic/dynamic, has been established by T.C. Chou and it is based on the physical/chemical principle of the massaction law (J. Theor. Biol. 59: 253-276, 1976 (質量作用中效定理) and Pharmacological Rev. 58: 621-681, 2006) (普世中效指數定理). The theory was developed by the principle of mathematical induction and deduction (數學演繹歸納法). Rearrangements of the median-effect equation lead to Michaelis-Menten, Hill, Scatchard, (...)
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  46.  11
    Vitaly G. Gorokhov (2008). A New Understanding of the Technological Progress in the Modern Philosophy of Technology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 48:25-31.
    In the 17th-19th centuries human society formed the understanding of scientific and technological progress as continuous improvement of society and nature on the basis of the growing capacity of scientific knowledge of the world. This belief in continuous scientific and technological progress, absolutisation of a value-free scientific research, illusion of actual «creatability» of the world on the basis of the obtained knowledge resulted in emergence of a scientific religion, based mostly on the belief in the power of scientific knowledge and (...)
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  47.  23
    David Coder (1969). Godel's Theorem and Mechanism. Philosophy 44 (September):234-7.
    In “Minds, Machines, and Gödel”, J. R. Lucas claims that Goedel's incompleteness theorem constitutes a proof “that Mechanism is false, that is, that minds cannot be explained as machines”. He claims further that “if the proof of the falsity of mechanism is valid, it is of the greatest consequence for the whole of philosophy”. It seems to me that both of these claims are exaggerated. It is true that no minds can be explained as machines. But it is (...)
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  48. Charles T. Wolfe, Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto historical and conceptual constellations in (...)
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  49.  71
    Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  50.  4
    Guy Dove (forthcoming). Redefining Physicalism. Topoi:1-10.
    Philosophers have traditionally treated physicalism as an empirically informed metaphysical thesis. This approach faces a well-known problem often referred to as Hempel’s dilemma: formulations of physicalism tend to be either false or indeterminate. The generally preferred strategy to address this problem involves an appeal to a hypothetical complete and ideal physical theory. After demonstrating that this strategy is not viable, I argue that we should redefine physicalism as an interdisciplinary research program seeking to explain the mental in terms of the (...)
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