Results for 'Christine M. Shea'

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  1.  8
    Women, Schooling, and Labor Force Participation, 1900-1920: Some Reflections on the Use of Quantification in Social History. [REVIEW]Christine M. Shea - 1986 - Education and Culture 6:3.
  2.  33
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Lynn Ilon, Alan J. Deyoung, Thomas R. Bidell, Sally Lubeck, Jean I. Erdman, Christine M. Shea, Anne E. Campbell, Kathryn A. Woolard, Bruce Beezer, Mario D. Fantini, Robert M. Ryan, D. D. Darland, Charles A. Tesconi Jr, Louis A. Petrone, Georgia C. Collins & Manning M. Pattillo Jr - 1987 - Educational Studies 18 (2):279-356.
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  3. The Normativity of Instrumental Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and practical reason. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This paper criticizes two accounts of the normativity of practical principles: the empiricist account and the rationalist or realist account. It argues against the empiricist view, focusing on the Humean texts that are usually taken to be its locus classicus. It then argues both against the dogmatic rationalist view, and for the Kantian view, through a discussion of Kant's own remarks about instrumental rationality in the second section of the Groundwork. It further argues that the instrumental principle cannot stand alone. (...)
     
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  4. The sources of normativity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Onora O'Neill.
    Ethical concepts are, or purport to be, normative. They make claims on us: they command, oblige, recommend, or guide. Or at least when we invoke them, we make claims on one another; but where does their authority over us - or ours over one another - come from? Christine Korsgaard identifies four accounts of the source of normativity that have been advocated by modern moral philosophers: voluntarism, realism, reflective endorsement, and the appeal to autonomy. She traces their history, showing (...)
  5. Self-constitution: agency, identity, and integrity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Agency and identity -- Necessitation -- Acts and actions -- Aristotle and Kant -- Agency and practical identity -- The metaphysics of normativity -- Constitutive standards -- The constitution of life -- In defense of teleology -- The paradox of self-constitution -- Formal and substantive principles of reason -- Formal versus substantive -- Testing versus weighing -- Maximizing and prudence -- Practical reason and the unity of the will -- The empiricist account of normativity -- The rationalist account of normativity (...)
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  6. Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Christine Korsgaard has become one of the leading interpreters of Kant's moral philosophy. She is identified with a small group of philosophers who are intent on producing a version of Kant's moral philosophy that is at once sensitive to its historical roots while revealing its particular relevance to contemporary problems. She rejects the traditional picture of Kant's ethics as a cold vision of the moral life which emphasises duty at the expense of love and value. Rather, Kant's work is (...)
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  7. The constitution of agency: essays on practical reason and moral psychology.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is one of today's leading moral philosophers: this volume collects ten influential papers by her on practical reason and moral psychology ...
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  8. Persuading Science. The Art of Scientific Rhetoric.M. Pera & W. R. Shea - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):375-386.
     
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  9. Two distinctions in goodness.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (2):169-195.
  10. Skepticism about practical reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):5-25.
    Content skepticism about practical reason is doubt about the bearing of rational considerations on the activities of deliberation and choice. Motivational skepticism is doubt about the scope of reason as a motive. Some people think that motivational considerations alone provide grounds for skepticism about the project of founding ethics on practical reason. I will argue, against this view, that motivational skepticism must always be based on content skepticism. I will not address the question of whether or not content skepticism is (...)
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  11.  94
    Fellow Creatures. Our Obligations to the Other Animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2018 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 73 (1):165-168.
  12.  24
    Requiring Athletes to Acknowledge Receipt of Concussion‐Related Information and Responsibility to Report Symptoms: A Study of the Prevalence, Variation, and Possible Improvements.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, Alexandra P. Bourlas & Kaitlyn I. Perry - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):297-313.
    State concussion laws and sport-league policies are important tools for protecting public health, but also present implementation challenges. Both state laws and league policies often require athletes provide written acknowledgement of having received concussion-related information and/or of their responsibility to report concussion-related symptoms. This paper examines these requirements in two ways: an analysis of the variation in state laws and sport-league policies and a study of their effects in a cohort of collegiate football players.
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  13.  22
    Requiring Athletes to Acknowledge Receipt of Concussion-Related Information and Responsibility to Report Symptoms: A Study of the Prevalence, Variation, and Possible Improvements.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, Alexandra P. Bourlas & Kaitlyn I. Perry - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):297-313.
  14. From Duty and for the Sake of the Noble: Kant and Aristotle on Morally Good Action.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - In Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting (eds.), Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle believes that an agent lacks virtue unless she enjoys the performance of virtuous actions, while Kant claims that the person who does her duty despite contrary inclinations exhibits a moral worth that the person who acts from inclination lacks. Despite these differences, this chapter argues that Aristotle and Kant share a distinctive view of the object of human choice and locus of moral value: that what we choose, and what has moral value, are not mere acts, but actions: acts (...)
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  15.  32
    Perceived Coach Support and Concussion Symptom‐Reporting: Differences between Freshmen and Non‐Freshmen College Football Players.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, Daniel H. Daneshvar & Robert A. Stern - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):314-322.
    This paper examines college athletes’ perceived support for concussion reporting from coaches and teammates and its variation by year-in-school, finding significant differences in perceived coach support. It also examines the effects of perceived coach support on concussion reporting behaviors, finding that greater perceived coach support is associated with fewer undiagnosed concussions and returning to play while symptomatic less frequently in the two weeks preceding the survey. Coaches play a critical role in athlete concussion reporting.
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  16.  29
    Perceived Coach Support and Concussion Symptom-Reporting: Differences between Freshmen and Non-Freshmen College Football Players.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, Daniel H. Daneshvar & Robert A. Stern - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):314-322.
    Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury that has been defined as a “trauma-induced alteration in mental status that may or may not involve loss of consciousness.” Terms such as getting a “ding” or getting your “bell rung” are sometimes used as colloquialisms for concussion, but inappropriately downplay the seriousness of the injury. It is estimated that between 1.6 and 3.8 million concussions occur annually in the United States as a result of participation in sports or recreational activities. To (...)
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  17.  51
    Skepticism about Practical Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):5-25.
  18. Personal identity and the unity of agency: A Kantian response to Parfit.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):103-31.
  19. The right to lie: Kant on dealing with evil.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (4):325-349.
    One of the great difficulties with Kant’s moral philosophy is that it seems to imply that our moral obligations leave us powerless in the face of evil. Kant’s theory sets a high ideal of conduct and tells us to live up to that ideal regardless of what other persons are doing. The results may be very bad. But Kant says that the law "remains in full force, because it commands categorically" (G, 438-39/57).* The most weI1—known example of...
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  20. Fellow creatures: Kantian ethics and our duties to animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - unknown
    Christine M. Korsgaard is Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She was educated at the University of Illinois and received a Ph.D. from Harvard. She has held positions at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago, and visiting positions at Berkeley and UCLA. She is a member of the American Philosophical Association and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has published extensively on Kant, and about (...)
     
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  21. Realism and Constructivism in Twentieth-Century Moral Philosophy.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28 (9999):99-122.
    In this paper I trace the development of one of the central debates of late twentieth-century moral philosophy—the debate between realism and what Rawls called “constructivism.” Realism, I argue, is a reactive position that arises in response to almost every attempt to give a substantive explanation of morality. It results from the realist’s belief that such explanations inevitably reduce moral phenomena to natural phenomena. I trace this belief, and the essence of realism, to a view about the nature of concepts—that (...)
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  22. Kant's Formula of Universal Law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):24-47.
  23. The Activity of Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 83 (2):23 - 43.
    Then you have a look around, and see that none of the uninitiated are listening to us—I mean the people who think that nothing exists but what they can grasp with both hands; people who refuse to admit that actions and processes and the invisible world in general have any place in reality.
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  24.  27
    Trust, Conflicts of Interest, and Concussion Reporting in College Football Players.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, William P. Meehan & Eric G. Campbell - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):307-314.
    Sports medicine clinicians face conflicts of interest in providing medical care to athletes. Using a survey of college football players, this study evaluates whether athletes are aware of these conflicts of interest, whether these conflicts affect athlete trust in their health care providers, or whether conflicts or athletes' trust in stakeholders are associated with athletes' injury reporting behaviors.
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  25. The reasons we can share: an attack on the distinction between agent-relative and agent-neutral values.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):24-51.
    To later generations, much of the moral philosophy of the twentieth century will look like a struggle to escape from utilitarianism. We seem to succeed in disproving one utilitarian doctrine, only to find ourselves caught in the grip of another. I believe that this is because a basic feature of the consequentialist outlook still pervades and distorts our thinking: the view that the business of morality is to bring something about . Too often, the rest of us have pitched our (...)
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  26. Self-constitution in the ethics of Plato and Kant.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1999 - The Journal of Ethics 3 (1):1-29.
    Plato and Kant advance a constitutional model of the soul, in which reason and appetite or passion have different structural and functional roles in the generation of motivation, as opposed to the familiar Combat Model in which they are portrayed as independent sources of motivation struggling for control. In terms of the constitutional model we may explain what makes an action different from an event. What makes an action attributable to a person, and therefore what makes it an action, is (...)
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  27. Constitutivism and the virtues.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 22 (2):98-116.
    In Self-Constitution, I argue that the principles governing action are “constitutive standards” of agency, standards that arise from the nature of agency itself. To be an agent is to be autonomousl...
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  28. The Right to Lie: Kant on Dealing with Evil.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press UK.
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  29.  12
    Decisions about College Football during Covid-19: An Ethical Analysis.Christine M. Baugh, Leonard Glantz & Michelle M. Mello - 2023 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 51 (1):104-118.
    This manuscript uses competitive college football as a lens into the complexities of decision-making amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Pulling together what is known about the decision-makers, the decision-making processes, the social and political context, the risks and benefits, and the underlying obligations of institutions to these athletes, we conduct an ethical analysis of the decisions surrounding the 2020 fall football season. Based on this ethical analysis, we provide key recommendations to improve similar decision processes moving forward.
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  30.  12
    Quality enhancement teams as an agent for change.Christine M. Abbott - 2000 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 4 (1):16-20.
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  31.  79
    Perspectives on Equality: Constructing a Relational Theory.Christine M. Koggel - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Beginning with liberalism's foundational idea of moral equality as the basis for treating people with equal concern and respect, Christine Koggel offers a modified account of what makes human beings equal and what is needed to achieve equality. Koggel utilizes insights from care ethics but switches the focus from care as a moral response within personal relationships to the broader network of relationships within which care is given or withheld. The result is an account of moral personhood and agency (...)
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  32. The Claims of Animals and the Needs of Strangers: Two Cases of Imperfect Right.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2018 - Journal of Practical Ethics 6 (1):19-51.
    This paper argues for a conception of the natural rights of non-human animals grounded in Kant’s explanation of the foundation of human rights. The rights in question are rights that are in the first instance held against humanity collectively speaking—against our species conceived as an organized body capable of collective action. The argument proceeds by first developing a similar case for the right of every human individual who is in need of aid to get it, and then showing why the (...)
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  33. Creating the kingdom of ends: Reciprocity and responsibility in personal relations.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:305-332.
  34. Autonomy and the Second Person Within: A Commentary on Stephen Darwall’s The Second‐Person Standpoint.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):8-23.
  35. Kantian Ethics, Animals, and the Law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (4):629-648.
    Legal systems divide the world into persons and property, treating animals as property. Some animal rights advocates have proposed treating animals as persons. Another option is to introduce a third normative category. This raises questions about how normative categories are established. In this article I argue that Kant established normative categories by determining what the presuppositions of rational practice are. According to Kant, rational choice presupposes that rational beings are ends in themselves and the rational use of the earth’s resources (...)
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  36.  25
    Critical Theory and the Humanities in the Age of the Alt-Right.Christine M. Battista & Melissa R. Sande (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This edited collection uses critical theory in order to understand the rise of the Alt-Right and the election of Donald Trump—and, in doing so, to assert the necessity and value of various disciplines within the humanities. While neoliberal mainstream culture has expressed shock at the seemingly expeditious rise of the Alt-Right movement and the outcome of the 2016 United States presidential election, a rich tradition of theory may not only explain the occurrence of this “phenomenon,” but may also chart an (...)
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  37. Acting for a Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2005 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 40 (1):11-35.
    The use of the English word “reason” in all of these contexts, and the way we translate equivalent terms from other languages, suggests a connection, but what exactly is it? Aristotle and Kant’s conception of what practical reasons are, I believe, can help us to answer this question, by bringing out what is distinctive, and distinctively active, about acting for a reason. That, at least, is what I am going to argue.
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  38. The Relational Nature of the Good.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 8:1.
  39. Aristotle and Kant on the source of value.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Ethics 96 (3):486-505.
    Kant holds that the good will is a source of value, In the sense that other things acquire their values from standing in an appropriate relation to it. I argue that aristotle holds a similar view about contemplation, And that this explains his preference for the contemplative life. They differ about what the source of value is because they differ about which kind of activity, ethical or contemplative, discovers meaning and purpose in the world.
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  40.  15
    Concussion Management Plans' Compliance with NCAA Requirements: Preliminary Evidence Suggesting Possible Improvement.Christine M. Baugh, Emily Kroshus, Kaitlyn I. Perry & Alexandra P. Bourlas - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (2):231-237.
    This study examined the extent to which concussion management plans at National Collegiate Athletic Association member schools were in line with NCAA Concussion Policy and best practice recommendations in absence of any process to ensure compliance. Most schools' concussion management plans were in compliance with 3 or 4 of the NCAA's 4 required components. Annual athlete education and acknowledgement was the requirement least often included, representing an area for improvement. Further, schools tended to more often include best practices that were (...)
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  41.  36
    Feminist relational theory.Christine M. Koggel, Ami Harbin & Jennifer J. Llewellyn - 2022 - Journal of Global Ethics 18 (1):1-14.
    Accounts of human beings as essentially social have had a long history in philosophy as reflected in the Ancient Greeks; in African and Asian philosophy; in Modern European thinkers such as Mary Wo...
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  42. Facing the Animal you See in the Mirror.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):4-9.
    A contribution to a panel on ethics and animals forthcoming in The Harvard Review of Philosophy.
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  43.  18
    Inquiry and Critical Thinking in School-Based Problem Solving.Christine M. Bonfiglio, Iii Edward J. Daly & Ruth A. Ervin - 2002 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 21 (4):5-7.
    This report describes a consultation case between a special education teacher and a school psychology student for a first grade student with a diagnosis of educable mental impairment. Adherence to data-based decision making and direct manipulation of hypothesized variables believed to be maintaining problem behaviors in the classroom revealed factors that were influencing the child’s behavior in the classroom. The teacher changed her behavior toward the student before a formal intervention plan could be developed and changes in student behavior were (...)
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  44. Geese As Icons and the Implications for Formulating A Semiotics Between the Literal and the Figurative.Christine M. Chun - 1985 - Nexus 4 (1):1.
     
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  45. Personhood, animals, and the law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Think 12 (34):25-32.
    ExtractThe idea that all the entities in the world may be, for legal and moral purposes, divided into the two categories of ‘persons’ and ‘things’ comes down to us from the tradition of Roman law. In the law, a ‘person’ is essentially the subject of rights and obligations, while a thing may be owned as property. In ethics, a person is an object of respect, to be valued for her own sake, and never to be used as a mere means (...)
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  46. On Having a Good.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (3):405-429.
    You are the kind of entity for whom things can be good or bad. This is one of the most important facts about you. It provides you with the grounds for taking a passionate interest in your own life, for you are deeply concerned that things should go well for you. Presumably, you also want to do well, but that may be in part because you think that doing well is good for you, and that your life would be impoverished (...)
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  47.  69
    Epistemic injustice in a settler nation: Canada’s history of erasing, silencing, marginalizing.Christine M. Koggel - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (2):240-251.
    This paper examines an application of epistemic injustice not fully explored in the literature. How does epistemic injustice function in broader contexts of relationships within countries between colonizers and colonized? More specifically, what can be learned about the ongoing structural aspects of hermeneutical injustice in Canada’s settler history of the forced assimilation of Indigenous peoples and the resultant erasing and marginalizing of Indigenous histories, languages, laws, traditions, and practices? In this paper, I use insights from Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (...)
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  48. Newtonianism in Scottish universities in the seventeenth century.Christine M. Shepherd - 1982 - In Campbell & Skinner (ed.), The Origins and Nature of the Scottish Enlightenment. pp. 65--85.
  49. Aristotle on Function and Virtue.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (3):259 - 279.
  50. The General Point of View: Love and Moral Approval in Hume's Ethics.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1-2):3-42.
    Hume thinks moral judgments are based on sentiments of approval and disapproval we feel when we contemplate someone from a "general point of view." We view her through the eyes of her "narrow circle" and judge her in accordance with general rules. Why do we take up the general point of view? Hume also argues that approval is a calm form of love, love of character, which sets a normative standard for other forms of love. In this paper I explain (...)
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