Results for 'Freedom of Speech'

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  1.  33
    Freedom of Speech as an Expressive Mode of Existence.Alexander Carnera - 2012 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):57-69.
    This paper adopts Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza’s expressionism and pure semiotics to argue that Spinoza’s Ethics offers an alternative notion of freedom of speech that is based on the potentia of the individual. Its aim is to show how freedom of thought is connected to the problem of individuation that connects our mode of being with our power to speak and think. Rather than treating freedom of speech as an enlightened idea that is in opposition (...)
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  2.  6
    Freedom of Speech in Modern Political Culture.Justyna Miklaszewska - 2019 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 10 (1):77-88.
    In the philosophy of liberalism, freedom of speech is one of the fundamental rights of the individual, one that is guaranteed by the constitution of a liberal democratic state. Contemporary Western democracies are based on the political culture in which human rights, including the right to free speech, play an important role. This right, however, can be violated by demagogic propaganda both in totalitarian regimes and in democracies. The propaganda mechanism, reaching into the sphere of community values (...)
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  3. Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW]Boudewijn de Bruin - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that (...)
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  4.  68
    Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Self-Expression, and Kant’s Public Use of Reason.Geert Van Eekert - 2017 - Diametros 54:118-137.
    This article turns to early modern and Enlightenment advocates of tolerance in order to discover and lay bare the line of argument that informed their commitment to free speech. This line of argument will subsequently be used to assess the shift from free speech to the contemporary ideal of free self-expression. In order to take this assessment one step further, this article will finally turn to Immanuel Kant’s famous defense of the public use of reason. In the wake (...)
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  5.  58
    Do You Mind If I Speak Freely?: Reconceptualizing Freedom of Speech.Lisa Heldke - 1991 - Social Theory and Practice 17 (3):349-368.
    In this paper, I develop a way to conceive of free speech that begins by redefining speech. My definition affirms the fact that speaking is an activity that goes on among people in a community. Speaking, I will suggest, is an activity that involves not only the present speaker, but also others who act as listeners and potential speakers. I contend that liberal conceptions of free speech have often proven ill equipped to address certain free speech (...)
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  6. Does Freedom of Speech Include Hate Speech?Caleb Yong - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (4):385-403.
    I take it that liberal justice recognises special protections against the restriction of speech and expression; this is what I call the Free Speech Principle. I ask if this Principle includes speech acts which might broadly be termed ‘hate speech’, where ‘includes’ is sensitive to the distinction between coverage and protection , and between speech that is regulable and speech that should be regulated . I suggest that ‘hate speech’ is too broad a (...)
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  7. Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory.Katharine Gelber - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible (...)
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  8. Freedom of Speech and its Limits.Wojciech Sadurski - 1999
     
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  9.  38
    Life in the Cloud and Freedom of Speech.J. Harris - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):307-311.
    This paper is primarily about the personal and public responsibilities of ethics and of ethicists in speaking, writing and commenting publicly about issues of ethical, political and social significance. The paper argues that any such interventions are ‘willy-nilly’, actually or potentially, in the public domain in ways that make any self-conscious decision about intended publics or audiences problematic. In it is argued that a famous, and hitherto useful, distinction relating to the ethical limitations on freedom of speech which (...)
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  10.  64
    Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education.Roy Harris - 2009 - British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (2):111-126.
    Why is freedom of speech so seldom raised as an issue in philosophy of education? In assessing this question, it is important to distinguish (i) between a freedom and its exercise, and (ii) between different philosophies of education. Western philosophies of education may be broadly divided into classes derived from theories of knowledge first articulated in ancient Greece. Freedom of speech is in principle inimical to some of these, while being essential to the objectives of (...)
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  11.  10
    Freedom of Speech and Moral Development in John Milton´s Political Thought and Johann Gottlieb Fichte´s Revolutionary Writings.Héctor Oscar Arrese Igor - 2019 - Las Torres de Lucca. International Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (14):9-33.
    This paper aims to explore conceptual relationships between philosophical developments to support freedom of speech in John Milton´s Areopagitica and Johann Gottlieb Fichte´s Reclamation of the Freedom of Thought. I intend to enhance the philosophical heritance collected and recreated by Fichte. This paper hypothesizes that both theories state that freedom of speech is a condition for the development of morality. In both cases, moral deliberation has a public character, given that moral judgment needs the consideration (...)
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  12.  15
    United States V Stevens: Gnawing Away at Freedom of Speech or Paving the Way for Animal Rights? [REVIEW]Irina Knopp - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):331-349.
    This article examines United States v. Stevens, a case recently decided by the Supreme Court, and its relation to animal law and freedom of speech issues, specifically the contention between the two, caused by the statute in question at the heart of the case. While animal rights advocates wish to frame the case through an anti-animal cruelty perspective, those seeking to protect freedom of speech have made the statute an issue of First Amendment rights. Is 18 (...)
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  13. Expression as Realization: Speakers' Interests in Freedom of Speech.Jonathan Gilmore - 2011 - Law and Philosophy 30 (5):517-539.
    I argue for the recognition of a particular kind of interest that one has in freedom of expression: an interest served by expressive activity in forming and discovering one’s own beliefs, desires, and commitments. In articulating that interest, I aim to contribute to a family of theories of freedom of expression that find its justification in the interests that speakers have in their own speech or thought, to be distinguished from whatever interests they may also have as (...)
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  14. The Fragility of Freedom of Speech.Nicholas Shackel - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):316-316.
    Freedom of speech is a fundamental liberty that imposes a stringent duty of tolerance. Tolerance is limited by direct incitements to violence. False notions and bad laws on speech have obscured our view of this freedom. Hence, perhaps, the self-righteous intolerance, incitements and threats in response to Giubilini and Minerva. Those who disagree have the right to argue back but their attempts to shut us up are morally wrong.
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  15.  10
    Diagonal Accountability: Freedom of Speech in Australia.Katharine Gelber - 2017 - Australian Journal of Human Rights 23 (2):209-219.
    In recent years, free speech debates have featured unusually prominently in public debate in Australia. At the same time, significant restrictions on freedom of speech have been enacted in the context of counterterrorism legislation, asylum-seeker policy, and anti-protest laws. This article critically analyses these policy developments through the lens of a capabilities approach-informed analysis of the importance of free speech. This engenders an understanding of the constitutive role of speech in individuals’ lives, and through that (...)
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  16.  19
    Freedom of Speech: Its Exercise and Its Interpretation.David A. Turner - 2010 - British Journal of Educational Studies 58 (3):285-291.
    Professor Roy Harris criticises me for ignoring freedom of speech in order to focus on 'soft' issues, such as game theory, decision theory and chaos theory. In this response, I accept most of his arguments relating to freedom of speech, but argue that, in order to develop better systems of education, we need to pay more attention to the circumstances in which that freedom can be exercised than Harris admits.
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  17.  36
    Anti-Racism and Unlimited Freedom of Speech: An Untenable Dualism.Marvin Glass - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):559 - 575.
    Perhaps it is best to begin on a semi-autobiographical note. In my liberal days, Mill's arguments in On Liberty for freedom of speech struck me as a paradigm of rationality: the force and eloquence of his presentation, I then thought, could not fail to impress themselves on any mature member of our species. But I am a Marxist now, and more and more of my former political beliefs now strike me as less and less tenable. It was considerations (...)
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  18.  10
    The Space for Strategic Manoeuvring in Adjudicating a Freedom of Speech Case in the Netherlands.Henrike Jansen - 2017 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 6 (2):105-136.
    In this article it is shown that the institutional preconditions of the activity type adjudicating a freedom of speech case leave much room for strategic manoeuvring with topical selection. To this end, an analysis is presented of the argumentation of the District Court in a case against the Dutch anti-immigration politician Geert Wilders. In order to show the space for manoeuvring, this argumentation, resulting in acquittal, is compared with the argumentation put forward by the Court of Appeal, which (...)
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  19.  33
    Incommensurability in Global Ethics, The Case of Islamic Aniconism and Freedom of Speech.Hamid Andishan - 2017 - Cultura 14 (2):37-48.
    Can all values be reduced to one or a few fundamental ones? Two values may neither exceed the other in importance nor be equal. In such situation, they cannot be reduced to each other or to a third value, and we can call such values as ”incommensurable”. Drawing on the concept of incommensurable values and what recently is called ”global ethics”, I will argue that if two values from two different cultures conflict, one must pay enough attention to the idea (...)
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  20.  9
    Thoughts on a Thinker-Based Approach to Freedom Of Speech.Eric Barendt - 2019 - Law and Philosophy 38 (5-6):481-494.
    While agreeing with Seana Shiffrin that any free speech theory must depend on assumptions about our need for free thinking, I am sceptical about her claim that her thinker-based approach provides the best explanation for freedom of speech. Her argument has some similarities with Mill’s argument from truth and with self-development theories, though it improves on the latter. But the thinker-based approach does not show why political discourse, broadly construed, is protected more strongly in all jurisdictions than (...)
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  21.  64
    Freedom of Speech, Multiculturalism and Islam: Yes We 'Can' Talk About This.Meg Wallace - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 109 (109):16.
    Wallace, Meg London's National Theatre recently hosted a debate about freedom of speech, multiculturalism and Islam called Can we talk about this? The opening line was a question to the audience, 'Are you morally superior to the Taliban?' Anne Marie Waters, who was present, wrote in her blog that 'very few people in the audience raised their hand to say they were.' This response demonstrates a misconceived attempt to be seen as tolerant and 'multiculturalist'. People could not bring (...)
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  22.  46
    Justifications of Freedom of Speech Towards a Double-Grounded Non-Consequentialist Approach.Devrim Kabasakal Badamchi - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (9):907-927.
    This article aims to develop a ground for freedom of speech that combines two justifications – democratic participation and autonomy. First, it is argued that consequentialist justifications, such as discovery of truth and personal development, are far from providing a strong justification for free speech due to their reliance on uncertain empirical validation. Second, it is claimed that a stronger and better ground for free speech can be constructed by articulating two non-consequentialist justifications for free (...) – democratic participation and autonomy. This articulation, which I call the double-grounded non-consequentialist justification for free speech, considers autonomy and democratic participation as complementary principles. In this sense, a double-grounded justification engages justification as autonomy and democratic participation in a dialogue in order to provide remedies for the specific weaknesses of these two positions. (shrink)
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  23.  14
    Freedom of Speech and Its Limits During Two Decades of Independence.Algimantas Šindeikis - 2013 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 20 (3):1023-1060.
    Freedom of speech has been essential in building democracy in Lithuania after regaining its independence. Exercise of the constitutional freedom of expression within the societies following constitutional values is the major factor shaping the political will of citizens. Wide-ranging, all round public discussion about all public interest issues is possible only when it is subject to due freedom of information. In indirect democracy, strong disseminator of information acting between citizens and the Parliament able to create the (...)
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  24. Freedom of Speech: Volume 21, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller & Jeffrey Paul - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether free speech is defended as a fundamental right that inheres in each individual, or as a guarantee that all of society's members will have a voice in democratic decision-making, the central role of expressive freedom in liberating the human spirit is undeniable. Freedom of expression will, as the essays in this volume illuminate, encounter new and continuing controversies in the twenty-first century. Advances in digital technology raise pressing questions regarding freedom of speech and, with (...)
     
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  25. Freedom of Speech Abridged?: Cultural, Legal and Philosophical Challenges.Anine Kierulf & Helge Rønning (eds.) - 2009 - Nordicom.
  26. Millian Principles, Freedom of Expression, and Hate Speech.David O. Brink - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (2):119-157.
    Hate speech employs discriminatory epithets to insult and stigmatize others on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other forms of group membership. The regulation of hate speech is deservedly controversial, in part because debates over hate speech seem to have teased apart libertarian and egalitarian strands within the liberal tradition. In the civil rights movements of the 1960s, libertarian concerns with freedom of movement and association and equal opportunity pointed in the same direction (...)
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  27. Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry.Jaana Eigi - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's (...)
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  28. Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan L. Hurley - 2006 - In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. pp. 301-337.
    Why does it matter whether and how individuals consciously control their behavior? It matters for many reasons. Here I focus on concerns about social influences of which agents are typically unaware on aggressive behavior.
     
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  29.  3
    Politics as Personal Freedom: An Analysis of Max Weber’s Speech “Politics as a Vocation”.Alexander Mishurin - 2019 - Wisdom 13 (2):85-94.
    This article covers a research devoted to the concept of politics articulated in Max Weber’s speech “Politics as a Vocation”. The article is divided into three parts. The first part highlights the historical and occasional contexts of the speech. In the second part, the three definitions of politics given by Weber are sequentially studied and linked with each other; then the picture of the politics of the immediate future is partially reconstructed in which politics as freedom is (...)
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  30.  33
    An Emotion-Based Approach to Freedom of Speech.R. George Wright - manuscript
    Free speech law often protects emotional expression. However, we lack an understanding of the scope and limits of protection for emotional expression. This Essay seeks to make progress toward such an understanding because a better understanding and grasp of the nature of emotion itself is crucial to achieving this goal. If we can arrive at an improved understanding of emotions and how they can be expressed, we will be better able to explain when we do and do not constitutionally (...)
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  31.  46
    Freedom of Communicative Action.Lawrence B. Solum - 1989 - Northwestern University Law Review 83 (1):54-135.
    The thesis of "Freedom of Communicative Action" is that Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative action illuminated the deep structure of the First Amendment freedom of speech. Haberams's theory takes speech act theory as its point of departure. Communicative action coordinates indivudal behavior through rational understanding. Communicative action is distinguished from strategic action--the use of communication to manipulate, deceive, or coerce. Part I offers an introduction. Part II outlines a hermeneutic approach to interpretation of the First Amendent. (...)
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  32. Censorship and Freedom of Speech.Robert Sparrow - 2004 - In Justin Healy (ed.), Censorship and Free Speech. The Spinney Press. pp. 1-4.
  33.  33
    On Philosophizing About Freedom of Speech.John Bruce Moore - 1975 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):47-73.
  34. When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? The Dilemmas of Freedom of Expression and Democratic Persuasion.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Perspectives on Politics 8 (4):1005-1019.
    Hate groups are often thought to reveal a paradox in liberal thinking. On the one hand, such groups challenge the very foundations of liberal thought, including core values of equality and freedom. On the other hand, these same values underlie the rights such as freedom of expression and association that protect hate groups. Thus a liberal democratic state that extends those protections to such groups in the name of value neutrality and freedom of expression may be thought (...)
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  35. Freedom of Expression, Hate Speech, and Censorship.Peter Vallentyne - 1996 - For Good Reason.
    In a narrow sense, hate speech is symbolic representation that expresses, hatred, contempt, or disregard for another person or group of persons. The use of deeply insulting racial or ethnic epithets is an example of such hate speech. In a broader sense, hate speech also includes the symbolic representation of views are deeply offensive to others. The expression of the view that women are morally inferior to (or less intelligent than) men is example of hate speech (...)
     
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  36. Freedom of Speech Acts? A Response to Langton.Daniel Jacobson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (1):64-78.
  37.  20
    Comic Satire and Freedom of Speech in Classical Athens.Stephen Halliwell - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:48-70.
  38.  4
    Adam Boreel on Collegiant Freedom of Speech.Francesco Quatrini - 2019 - Journal of the History of Ideas 80 (4):511-531.
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  39. Freedom of Speech.David van Mill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  40.  64
    Freedom of Speech and Religion.Andrew Altman - 2003 - In LaFollette H. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 358.
  41.  27
    Freedom of Speech and the Public Platform.Jenny Teichman - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1):99-105.
  42.  17
    The Christian’s Freedom of Speech in the New Testament.W. C. Van Unnik - 1962 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 44 (2):466-488.
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  43.  42
    Freedom of Speech: Liberals Yersus Radicals.William Bruening - 1976 - Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (3):1-4.
  44.  52
    There's No Such Thing as Heresy (and It's a Good Thing, Too): William of Ockham on Freedom of Speech.Sharon Kaye - 1998 - Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):41–52.
  45.  39
    Homosexuality and Freedom of Speech.R. D. Catterall - 1980 - Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):128-129.
  46.  33
    Freedom of Speech and Access to Mass Media.Joseph Grcic - 1988 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):51-58.
  47.  18
    Chapter Four. Lying and Freedom of Speech.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 2015 - In Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law: On Lying, Morality, and the Law. Princeton University Press. pp. 116-156.
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  48. Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan Hurley - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
  49.  20
    Freedom of Speech, Sexual Harassment, and Internet Filters in Academic Libraries.Avi Janssen - 2000 - Journal of Information Ethics 9 (2):37-45.
  50.  16
    Chapter Three. A Thinker-Based Approach to Freedom of Speech.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 2015 - In Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law: On Lying, Morality, and the Law. Princeton University Press. pp. 79-115.
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