Results for 'Kin-Ichiro Kajikawa'

600 found
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  1.  4
    Japan: A New Field Emerges.Kin-Ichiro Kajikawa - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (4):29-30.
  2. Human Dignity and Medicine: Proceedings of the Fukui Bioethics Seminar Held in Fukui, Japan, 10-12 April 1987.Jean Bernard, Kinʼichirō Kajikawa & Norio Fujiki (eds.) - 1988 - Excerpta Medica.
     
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  3. Neuronal Oscillations and Visual Amplification of Speech.Charles E. Schroeder, Peter Lakatos, Yoshinao Kajikawa, Sarah Partan & Aina Puce - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (3):106-113.
  4.  29
    Infant-Directed Speech Supports Phonetic Category Learning in English and Japanese.Janet F. Werker, Ferran Pons, Christiane Dietrich, Sachiyo Kajikawa, Laurel Fais & Shigeaki Amano - 2007 - Cognition 103 (1):147-162.
  5.  5
    Re: City of Lions.Ostap Kin - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:201-204.
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  6.  14
    Zen and Healing.Okumura Ichiro - 1999 - Journal of Dharma 24:6-17.
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  7. Kin Selection and Its Critics.Jonathan Birch & Samir Okasha - 2015 - BioScience 65 (1):22-32.
    Hamilton’s theory of kin selection is the best-known framework for understanding the evolution of social behavior but has long been a source of controversy in evolutionary biology. A recent critique of the theory by Nowak, Tarnita, and Wilson sparked a new round of debate, which shows no signs of abating. In this overview, we highlight a number of conceptual issues that lie at the heart of the current debate. We begin by emphasizing that there are various alternative formulations of Hamilton’s (...)
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  8.  29
    Are Kin and Group Selection Rivals or Friends?Jonathan Birch - 2019 - Current Biology 29 (11):R433-R438.
    Kin selection and group selection were once seen as competing explanatory hypotheses but now tend to be seen as equivalent ways of describing the same basic idea. Yet this ‘equivalence thesis’ seems not to have brought proponents of kin selection and group selection any closer together. This may be because the equivalence thesis merely shows the equivalence of two statistical formalisms without saying anything about causality. W.D. Hamilton was the first to derive an equivalence result of this type. Yet Hamilton (...)
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  9.  15
    Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi.Rebecca Sear - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):277-293.
    This paper investigates the impact of kin on child survival in a matrilineal society in Malawi. Women usually live in close proximity to their matrilineal kin in this agricultural community, allowing opportunities for helping behavior between matrilineal relatives. However, there is little evidence that matrilineal kin are beneficial to children. On the contrary, child mortality rates appear to be higher in the presence of maternal grandmothers and maternal aunts. These effects are modified by the sex of child and resource ownership: (...)
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  10.  15
    Kin Preference and Partner Choice.David A. Nolin - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):156-176.
    This paper presents a comparison of social kinship (patrilineage) and biological kinship (genetic relatedness) in predicting cooperative relationships in two different economic contexts in the fishing and whaling village of Lamalera, Indonesia. A previous analysis (Alvard, Human Nature 14:129–163, 2003) of boat crew affiliation data collected in the village in 1999 found that social kinship (patrilineage) was a better predictor of crew affiliation than was genetic kinship. A replication of this analysis using similar data collected in 2006 finds the same (...)
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  11.  23
    Kin Relationships and the Caregiving Biases of Grandparents, Aunts, and Uncles.Alexander Pashos & Donald H. McBurney - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):311-330.
    Paternity certainty and matrilineal family ties have been used to explain the asymmetric caregiving of grandparents and aunts and uncles. The proximate mechanisms underlying biased kin investment, however, remain unclear. A central question of the study presented here was whether the parent-kin relationship is an important link in the caregiving. In a two-generational questionnaire study, we asked subjects to estimate the intensity of their relationships to parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles (emotional closeness, investment received in childhood). In addition, the subjects’ (...)
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  12.  77
    Kin Selection, Group Selection, and the Varieties of Population Structure.Jonathan Birch - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (1):259-286.
    Various results show the ‘formal equivalence’ of kin and group selectionist methodologies, but this does not preclude there being a real and useful distinction between kin and group selection processes. I distinguish individual- and population-centred approaches to drawing such a distinction, and I proceed to develop the latter. On the account I advance, the differences between kin and group selection are differences of degree in the structural properties of populations. A spatial metaphor provides a useful framework for thinking about these (...)
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  13.  29
    How Do Nursing Home Doctors Involve Patients and Next of Kin in End-of-Life Decisions? A Qualitative Study From Norway.Maria Romøren, Reidar Pedersen & Reidun Førde - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundEthically challenging critical events and decisions are common in nursing homes. This paper presents nursing home doctors’ descriptions of how they include the patient and next of kin in end-of-life decisions.MethodsWe performed ten focus groups with 30 nursing home doctors. Advance care planning; aspects of decisions on life-prolonging treatment, and conflict with next of kin were subject to in-depth analysis and condensation.ResultsThe doctors described large variations in attitudes and practices in all aspects of end-of-life decisions. In conflict situations, many doctors (...)
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  14.  57
    Kin Selection: A Philosophical Analysis.Jonathan Birch - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Cambridge
    This dissertation examines the conceptual and theoretical foundations of the most general and most widely used framework for understanding social evolution, W. D. Hamilton's theory of kin selection. While the core idea is intuitive enough (when organisms share genes, they sometimes have an evolutionary incentive to help one another), its apparent simplicity masks a host of conceptual subtleties, and the theory has proved a perennial source of controversy in evolutionary biology. To move towards a resolution of these controversies, we need (...)
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  15.  34
    Lineage, Sex, and Wealth as Moderators of Kin Investment.Gregory D. Webster, Angela Bryan, Charles B. Crawford, Lisa McCarthy & Brandy H. Cohen - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):189-210.
    Supporting Hamilton’s inclusive fitness theory, archival analyses of inheritance patterns in wills have revealed that people invest more of their estates in kin of closer genetic relatedness. Recent classroom experiments have shown that this genetic relatedness effect is stronger for relatives of direct lineage (children, grandchildren) than for relatives of collateral lineage (siblings, nieces, nephews). In the present research, multilevel modeling of more than 1,000 British Columbian wills revealed a positive effect of genetic relatedness on proportions of estates allocated to (...)
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  16.  10
    On the Impact of Sex and Birth Order on Contact with Kin.Catherine A. Salmon - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (2):183-197.
    Previous research indicates that birth order is a strong predictor of familial sentiments, with middleborns less family-oriented than first- or last-borns. In this research, effects of sex and birth order on the actual frequency of contact with maternal and paternal kin were examined in two studies. In Study 1, one hundred and forty undergraduates completed a questionnaire relating to the amount of time they spent in contact with specific relatives, while in Study 2, one hundred and twelve undergraduates completed the (...)
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  17.  54
    Sexual Selection for Syntax and Kin Selection for Semantics: Problems and Prospects.Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):453-470.
    The evolution of human language, and the kind of thought the communication of which requires it, raises considerable explanatory challenges. These systems of representation constitute a radical discontinuity in the natural world. Even species closely related to our own appear incapable of either thought or talk with the recursive structure, generalized systematicity, and task-domain neutrality that characterize human talk and the thought it expresses. W. Tecumseh Fitch’s proposal (2004, in press) that human language is descended from a sexually selected, prosodic (...)
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  18. Kin Investment in Wage-Labor Economies.Mary K. Shenk - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (1):81-113.
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  19.  11
    Cultural Dimensions of Kin Investment.Donna L. Leonetti - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):227-230.
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  20.  74
    The Relation Between Kin and Multilevel Selection: An Approach Using Causal Graphs.Samir Okasha - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (2):435-470.
    Kin selection and multilevel selection are alternative approaches for studying the evolution of social behaviour, the relation between which has long been a source of controversy. Many recent theorists regard the two approaches as ultimately equivalent, on the grounds that gene frequency change can be correctly expressed using either. However, this shows only that the two are formally equivalent, not that they offer equally good causal representations of the evolutionary process. This article articulates the notion of an ‘adequate causal representation’ (...)
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  21. How Does Functional Neurodiagnostics Inform Surrogate Decision-Making for Patients with Disorders of Consciousness? A Qualitative Interview Study with Patients’ Next of Kin.Leah Schembs, Maria Ruhfass, Eric Racine, Ralf J. Jox, Andreas Bender, Martin Rosenfelder & Katja Kuehlmeyer - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-20.
    BackgroundFunctional neurodiagnostics could allow researchers and clinicians to distinguish more accurately between the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and the minimally conscious state. It remains unclear how it informs surrogate decision-making.ObjectiveTo explore how the next of kin of patients with disorders of consciousness interpret the results of a functional neurodiagnostics measure and how/why their interpretations influence their attitudes towards medical decisions.Methods and SampleWe conducted problem-centered interviews with seven next of kin of patients with DOC who had undergone a functional HD-EEG examination at (...)
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  22.  13
    Household and Kin Provisioning by Hadza Men.Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (3):280-317.
    We use data collected among Hadza hunter-gatherers between 2005 and 2009 to examine hypotheses about the causes and consequences of men’s foraging and food sharing. We find that Hadza men foraged for a range of food types, including fruit, honey, small animals, and large game. Large game were shared not like common goods, but in ways that significantly advantaged producers’ households. Food sharing and consumption data show that men channeled the foods they produced to their wives, children, and their consanguineal (...)
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  23. Praise, Blame, Obligation, and DWE: Toward a Framework for Classical Supererogation and Kin.Paul McNamara - 2011 - Journal of Applied Logic 9 (2):153-170.
    Continuing prior work by the author, a simple classical system for personal obligation is integrated with a fairly rich system for aretaic (agent-evaluative) appraisal. I then explore various relationships between definable aretaic statuses such as praiseworthiness and blameworthiness and deontic statuses such as obligatoriness and impermissibility. I focus on partitions of the normative statuses generated ("normative positions" but without explicit representation of agency). In addition to being able to model and explore fundamental questions in ethical theory about the connection between (...)
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  24. The Costs and Benefits of Kin.Craig Hadley - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):377-395.
    In this paper data from a Tanzanian horticultural population are used to assess whether mother’s kin network size predicts several measures of children’s health and well-being, and whether any kin effects are modified by household socioeconomic status. This hypothesis is further tested with a questionnaire on maternal attitudes towards kin. Results show small associations between measures of maternal kin network size and child mortality and children’s growth performance. Together these results suggest that kin positively influence child health, but the effects (...)
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  25.  12
    Com-Posting Experimental Futures: Pragmatists Making Kin with New Materialists.Barbara S. Stengel - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (1):7-29.
    Here I craft a case for recognizing the roots and patterns that ground the possibility of contemporary com-posting—as outlined in Donna Haraway’s Staying with the Trouble—by New Materialists and critical pragmatists, especially those who are affected by the social injustices and ill-advised practices of today’s formal education. I explore both Spinozan Ethics and American pragmatism in order to fashion a pattern that affects educational thought and action. That pattern of affect/affecting is one Haraway calls “attunement”, a state of co-relation that (...)
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  26.  6
    Next of Kin’s Experiences of Involvement During Involuntary Hospitalisation and Coercion.Reidun Førde, Reidun Norvoll, Marit Helene Hem & Reidar Pedersen - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):76.
    BackgroundNorway has extensive and detailed legal requirements and guidelines concerning involvement of next of kin during involuntary hospital treatment of seriously mentally ill patients. However, we have little knowledge about what happens in practice. This study explores NOK’s views and experiences of involvement during involuntary hospitalisation in Norway.MethodsWe performed qualitative interviews-focus groups and individual-with 36 adult NOK to adults and adolescents who had been involuntarily admitted once or several times. The semi-structured interview guide included questions on experiences with and views (...)
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  27.  61
    Darwin’s Views on Group and Kin Selection: Comments on Elliott Sober’s Did Darwin Write the Origin Backwards?Samir Okasha - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (3):823-828.
    My comments will focus on the second and third chapters of Sober’s book , which explore Darwin’s ideas about altruism, group selection and kin selection , and sex-ratio evolution . Sober makes a persuasive argument for his main claim: that Darwin was a subtler thinker on these topics than he is often taken to be. While there is much that I admire in Sober’s lucid discussion, I will focus on points of disagreement. Readers should note that this is not the (...)
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  28.  82
    Contro gli artisti. Tanizaki Jun’ichirō e l’uomo d’arte.Enea Bianchi - 2017 - Ágalma: Rivista di studi culturali e di estetica 33:54-64.
    Against the Artists. Jun'ichirō Tanizaki and the Man of Art. -/- This essay explores the concepts of "art" (gei) and "man of art" (geinin) in Tanizaki's works. These two notions belong to an ancient Japanese aesthetic tradition. The concept of 'gei' means "realization", "skill", but also "technique" and "ability". Traditional stage performances such as 'nō', 'kyōgen', 'bunraku', 'kabuki', are typical examples of 'gei'. On the other hand the concept of 'geinin' implies three pivotal aspects: 1) a strict and harsh aesthetic (...)
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  29.  47
    Postmarital Residence and Bilateral Kin Associations Among Hunter-Gatherers.Karen L. Kramer & Russell D. Greaves - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):41-63.
    Dispersal of individuals from their natal communities at sexual maturity is an important determinant of kin association. In this paper we compare postmarital residence patterns among Pumé foragers of Venezuela to investigate the prevalence of sex-biased vs. bilateral residence. This study complements cross-cultural overviews by examining postmarital kin association in relation to individual, longitudinal data on residence within a forager society. Based on cultural norms, the Pumé have been characterized as matrilocal. Analysis of Pumé marriages over a 25-year period finds (...)
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  30.  10
    Female Mobility and Postmarital Kin Access in a Patrilocal Society.Brooke A. Scelza - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (4):377-393.
    Across a wide variety of cultural settings, kin have been shown to play an important role in promoting women’s reproductive success. Patrilocal postmarital residence is a potential hindrance to maintaining these support networks, raising the question: how do women preserve and foster relationships with their natal kin when propinquity is disrupted? Using census and interview data from the Himba, a group of semi-nomadic African pastoralists, I first show that although women have reduced kin propinquity after marriage, more than half of (...)
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  31.  3
    Does Kin-Selection Theory Help to Explain Support Networks among Farmers in South-Central Ethiopia?Lucie Clech, Ashley Hazel & Mhairi A. Gibson - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (4):422-447.
    Social support networks play a key role in human livelihood security, especially in vulnerable communities. Here we explore how evolutionary ideas of kin selection and intrahousehold resource competition can explain individual variation in daily support network size and composition in a south-central Ethiopian agricultural community. We consider both domestic and agricultural help across two generations with different wealth-transfer norms that yield different contexts for sibling competition. For farmers who inherited land rights from family, firstborns were more likely to report daily (...)
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  32.  5
    Does Coercion Matter? Supporting Young Next-of-Kin in Mental Health Care.Elin Håkonsen Martinsen, Bente Weimand & Reidun Norvoll - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301987168.
    Background: Coercion can cause harm to both the patient and the patient’s family. Few studies have examined how the coercive treatment of a close relative might affect young next-of-kin. Research questions: We aimed to investigate the views and experiences of health professionals being responsible for supporting young next-of-kin to patients in mental health care in relation to the needs of these young next-of-kin in coercive situations and to identify ethical challenges. Research design: We conducted a qualitative study based on semistructured, (...)
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  33.  2
    The Ethics of Kin State Activism: A Cosmopolitan Defense.George Vasilev - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (4):395-410.
    A notable feature of nationalism's contemporary resurgence is the increasing eagerness of governments to support and shape the political causes of populations living abroad that are viewed as ethnic kindred. However, global criteria for judging when such kin state activism is and is not acceptable have so far remained elusive, as the objectionable instances of the practice tend to overshadow the legally and morally consistent ones. I argue that the analysis of world affairs and promotion of global justice would benefit (...)
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  34.  24
    Empathy for Non-Kin, the Faraway, the Unfamiliar, and the Abstract––An Interdisciplinary Study on Mencian Moral Cultivation and a Response to Prinz.Jing Hu - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (3):349-362.
    This article challenges the pessimistic view that empathy and other fellow feelings are biased and erratic motivation for morality. By discussing Mencius’ account on how to develop empathy from its biased and erratic beginnings, I argue that empathy can be extended to less common objects, such as non-kin, the faraway, the unfamiliar, and the abstract. The extension facilitated by empathy in turn enhances one’s moral cognition toward the sufferings of less common objects; the extension also helps to include less common (...)
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  35.  64
    Critical Study of Michael Potter’s Reason’s Nearest Kin. [REVIEW]Richard Zach - 2005 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 46 (4):503-513.
    Critical study of Michael Potter, Reason's Nearest Kin. Philosophies of Arithmetic from Kant to Carnap. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000. x + 305 pages.
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  36.  18
    Tolerated Reciprocity, Reciprocal Scrounging, and Unrelated Kin: MaKing Sense of Multiple Models.Michael Gurven - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):572-579.
    Four models commonly employed in sharing analyses (reciprocal altruism [RA], tolerated scrounging [TS], costly signaling [CS], and kin selection [KS]) have common features which render rigorous testing of unique predictions difficult. Relaxed versions of these models are discussed in an attempt to understand how the underlying principles of delayed returns, avoiding costs, building reputation, and aiding biological kin interact in systems of sharing. Special attention is given to the interpretation of contingency measures that critically define some form of reciprocal altruism.
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  37.  42
    Exploring the Conceptual and Semantic Structure of Human Kinship: An Experimental Investigation of Chinese Kin Terms.Chao Liu, Yue Ge, Xiaoqin Mai & Yue-Jia Luo - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):392-394.
    We designed an experiment to test the application of optimality theory (OT) in kinship terminology studies. Specifically, we examined the OT constraints within a set of behavioral data using Chinese kin terms. The results from this behavioral approach support and extend Jones' linguistic approach by identifying underlying cognitive mechanisms that can explain and predict behavioral responses in kinship identification.
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  38.  80
    The Homeopathy of Kin Selection: An Evaluation of van den Berghe’s Sociobiological Approach to Ethnic Nepotism.Ingo Brigandt - 2001 - Politics and the Life Sciences 20:203–215.
    The present discussion of sociobiological approaches to ethnic nepotism takes Pierre van den Berghe ʼs theory as a starting point. Two points, which have not been addressed in former analyses, are considered to be of particular importance. It is argued that the behavioral mechanism of ethnic nepotism—as understood by van den Berghe—cannot explain ethnic boundaries and attitudes. In addition, I show that van den Bergheʼs central premise concerning ethnic nepotism is in contradiction to Hamiltonʼs formula, the essential principle of kin (...)
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  39.  67
    Verbin, N., Divinely Abused: A Philosophical Perspective on Job and His Kin: Continuum, New York, 2010, Xvi and 168 Pages, $110. [REVIEW]A. K. Anderson - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):155-159.
    Verbin, N., Divinely abused: a philosophical perspective on Job and his kin Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11153-010-9262-5 Authors A. K. Anderson, Department of Religion, Wofford College, 429 N. Church St., Spartanburg, SC 29303, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
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  40.  32
    Why Do We Need to Coordinate When Classifying Kin?Drew Gerkey & Lee Cronk - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):385-386.
    We suggest that there are two coordination games when it comes to understanding kin terminology. Jones' article focuses on the linguistic coordination inherent in developing meaningful kin terminologies, alluding briefly to the benefits of these kin terminologies for coordination in other domains. We enhance Jones' discussion by tracing the links between the structure of kin terminologies and their functions.
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  41.  51
    Thoughts on the Bioethics of Estranged Biological Kin.Lisa Cassidy - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):32-48.
    This paper considers the bioethics of estranged biological kin, who are biologically related people not in contact with one another (due to adoption, abandonment, or other long-term estrangement). Specifically, I am interested in what is owed to estranged biological kin in the event of medical need. A survey of current bioethics demonstrates that most analyses are not prepared to reckon with the complications of having or being estranged biological kin. For example, adoptees might wonder if a lack of contact with (...)
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  42.  5
    Foraging Performance, Prosociality, and Kin Presence Do Not Predict Lifetime Reproductive Success in Batek Hunter-Gatherers.Thomas S. Kraft, Vivek V. Venkataraman, Ivan Tacey, Nathaniel J. Dominy & Kirk M. Endicott - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (1):71-97.
    Identifying the determinants of reproductive success in small-scale societies is critical for understanding how natural selection has shaped human evolution and behavior. The available evidence suggests that status-accruing behaviors such as hunting and prosociality are pathways to reproductive success, but social egalitarianism may diminish this pathway. Here we introduce a mixed longitudinal/cross-sectional dataset based on 45 years of research with the Batek, a population of egalitarian rain forest hunter-gatherers in Peninsular Malaysia, and use it to test the effects of four (...)
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  43.  49
    Kin-Selection: The Rise and Fall of Kin-Cheaters.Sherri Goings - unknown
    We demonstrate the existence of altruism via kin selection in artificial life and explore its nuances. We do so in the Avida system through a setup that is based on the behavior of colicinogenic bacteria: Organisms can kill unrelated organisms in a given radius but must kill themselves to do so. Initially, we confirm!results found in the bacterial world: Digital organisms do sacrifice themselves for their kin—an extreme example of altruism— and do so more often in structured environments, where kin (...)
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  44.  25
    Grandparental Transfers and Kin Selection.Raymond Hames - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):26-27.
    In the analysis of intergenerational transfer, several improvements can be made. First, following kin selection theory, grandparents have kin other than grandchildren in which to invest and therefore any investigation into grandparents should take this perspective. Secondly, how transfers actually enhance the survivorship of younger relatives such as grandchildren must be better measured, especially in the ethnographic literature. Finally, the problem of indirect investments or targeting must be considered.
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  45.  23
    Does Commitment Theory Explain Non-Kin Altruism in Religious Contexts?Hector N. Qirko - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):746-747.
    Atran & Norenzayan (A&N) fail to address several problems with commitment theory as it relates to non-kin altruism in religious contexts. They (1) provide little support for the contention that religious sacrifices function as signals, (2) do not distinguish between religious specialists and lay believers, and (3) conflate definitions of cooperation and sacrifice.
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  46.  9
    The Kin Contract and Citizenship in the Middle East.Suad Joseph - 2005 - In Marilyn Friedman (ed.), Women and Citizenship. Oup Usa. pp. 149--169.
    Joseph focuses on the ways in which ideas about family and family idioms, relationships, and practices ground and intersect with formal governmental policies and practices in the Middle East. Families and kinship are politically privileged in most Middle Eastern states and women and men are committed to their families in Lebanon in a manner that Joseph calls the “kin contract,” a commitment reinforced by a care/control paradigm in which familial care is often enmeshed with the control by a family system (...)
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  47.  15
    Less Restricted Mating, Low Contact with Kin, and the Role of Culture.Lesley Newson & Tom Postmes - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):291-292.
    On the basis of a reinterpretation of the International Sexuality Description Project (ISDP) data, we suggest that findings are consistent with the view that human reproductive behaviour is largely under social control. Behaviours associated with a high Sociosexual Orientation Index (SOI) may be part of a progressive change in reproductive behaviour initiated by the dispersal of kin that occurs as societies modernize.
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  48. Cognitive Kin, Moral Strangers? Linking Animal Cognition, Animal Ethics & Animal Welfareverwandte Im Geiste – Fremde Im Recht. Sozio-Kognitive Fähigkeiten Bei Tieren Und Ihre Relevanz Für Tierethik Und Tierschutz.Judith Benz-Schwarzburg - 2019 - Brill.
    In _Cognitive Kin, Moral Strangers?_, Judith Benz-Schwarzburg investigates whether non-human animals share complex socio-cognitive abilities like culture, language and theory of mind with humans. She questions our supposedly human uniqueness and explores how cognitive kinship matters for animal ethics.
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  49.  21
    Phrasal Movement and its Kin.David Pesetsky - manuscript
    The investigations reported here are the result of three lucky events. The first occurred in 1986. I had recently done the work reported in Pesetsky (1987), and received in the mail a copy of Kiss (1986). Since I had argued at length that D-linked wh-phrases do not display Superiority effects. I was astonished by a paradigm reported by Kiss, which appears here as example (98). These facts remained stubbornly in my mind for the next decade as an unsolved puzzle. Kiss (...)
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  50. Ichiro Numazaki.Global Bioethics - 2000 - Global Bioethics 13 (1-2).
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