Results for 'Margaret Harrison'

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  1.  11
    Margaret J. Osler. Reconfiguring the World: Nature, God, and Human Understanding From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Europe. X + 184 Pp., Illus., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. $25. [REVIEW]Peter Harrison - 2011 - Isis 102 (4):749-750.
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  2.  20
    Quality of Stroke Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines.Amanda Hurdowar, Ian D. Graham, Mark Bayley, Margaret Harrison, Sharon Wood‐Dauphinee & Sanjit Bhogal - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):657-664.
  3.  62
    Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens.G. C. R., Jane E. Harrison & Margaret de G. Verrall - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:218.
  4.  41
    New Books. [REVIEW]H. H. Price, David Pears, William Kneale, Max Black, A. F. Peters, George E. Hughes, Margaret Macdonald, G. J. Warnock, T. D. Weldon, R. F. Holland, H. D. Lewis, Antony Flew, W. G. Maclagan, J. Harrison, Richard Wollheim, P. L. Heath, Donald Nicholl, Patrick Gardiner & Ernest Gellner - 1951 - Mind 60 (240):550-583.
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  5.  28
    How Ludwig Became a Homunculus: Harrison How Ludwig Became a Homunculus.Jonathan Harrison - 2009 - Think 8 (21):7-12.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  6. Do Animals Feel Pain?: Peter Harrison.Peter Harrison - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (255):25-40.
    In an oft-quoted passage from The Principles of Morals and Legislation, Jeremy Bentham addresses the issue of our treatment of animals with the following words: ‘the question is not, Can they reason? nor, can they talk? but, Can they suffer?’ The point is well taken, for surely if animals suffer, they are legitimate objects of our moral concern. It is curious therefore, given the current interest in the moral status of animals, that Bentham's question has been assumed to be merely (...)
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  7. Hooray! We're Not Morally Responsible!: Harrison Hooray! We're Not Morally Responsible!Gerald K. Harrison - 2009 - Think 8 (23):87-95.
    Being morally responsible means being blameworthy and deserving of punishment if we do wrong and praiseworthy and deserving reward if we do right. In what follows I shall argue that in all likelihood we're not morally responsible. None of us. Ever.
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  8.  8
    Transcendental Arguments and Idealism: Ross Harrison.Ross Harrison - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:211-224.
    ‘Metaphysics’, said Bradley, ‘is the finding of bad reasons for what we believe on instinct, but to find these reasons is no less an instinct.’ This idea that reasoning is both instinctive and feeble is reminiscent of Hume; except that reasons in Hume tend to serve as the solvent rather than the support of instinctive beliefs. Instinct leads us to play backgammon with other individuals whom we assume inhabit a world which exists independently of our own perception and which will (...)
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  9.  18
    Representation and Conceptual Change: Andrew Harrison.Andrew Harrison - 1972 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 6:106-131.
    This paper suffers from a disconcerting generality. I need an excuse for wandering from Wittgenstein's Tractatus to Picasso's drawing of a Weeping Woman, via the philosophy of science and the theory of sense data. The thesis of the paper is that I have such an excuse. These are all areas where the concept of representation either exists in its own right, or has been found to be illuminating by philosophers. An important question is whether it could be the same concept (...)
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  10.  21
    Sitzler's Notice of Harrison's Theognis.E. Harrison - 1903 - The Classical Review 17 (09):470-.
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  11.  19
    Geach on Harrison on Geach on God.Jonathan Harrison - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (200):223 - 226.
  12.  23
    Malcolm E. Finbow, Michael Harrison and Phillip Jones Reply.Malcolm Finbow, Mike Harrison & Phil Jones - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (8):745-745.
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  13.  10
    Sitzler's Notice of Harrison's Theognis.E. Harrison - 1903 - The Classical Review 17 (9):470-470.
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  14.  13
    Cambridge Philosophers VI: Henry Sidgwick: Ross Harrison.Ross Harrison - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (277):423-438.
    The philosophy department in Edinburgh is in David Hume tower; the philosophy faculty at Cambridge is in Sidgwick Avenue. In one way, no competition. Everybody has heard of Hume, whereas even the anybody who's anybody may not have heard of Sidgwick. Yet in another way, Sidgwick wins this arcane contest. For if David Hume, contradicting the Humean theory of personal identity, were to return to Edinburgh, he would not recognize the tower. Whereas, if someone with more success in rearousing spirits (...)
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  15.  22
    A Howler of Harrison'S.Jonathan Harrison - 1998 - Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):526.
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  16.  3
    Kant and the Sincere Fanatic: Bernard Harrison.Bernard Harrison - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:226-261.
    ‘I see well enough what poor Kant would be at’ said James Mill on first looking into the Kritik der reinen Vernunft. No one would wish to say that the reception of Kant in England has remained at this level: abundance of sound scholarship, innumerable Kant seminars and the swell of interest in transcendental argument which has developed since the Second World War all exist to prove the contrary. But in spite of all that, Mill's response still touches a chord (...)
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  17. The Positivist Library of August Comte, Tr. And Ed. By F. Harrison.Isidore Auguste M. Comte & Frederic Harrison - 1886
     
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  18. Frederic Harrison.Austin Harrison - 1926 - London: W. Heinemann.
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  19. HARRISON, J. "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW]B. Harrison - 1983 - Mind 92:604.
     
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  20. J. Harrison, "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW]Geoffrey Harrison - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (29):384.
     
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  21. On the Supposed Necessity of Certain Metaphysical Problems [a Paper by F. Harrison. No. 25 of a Ser.].Frederic Harrison - 1872
     
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  22.  69
    Neuroeconomics: A Critical Reconsideration: Glenn W. Harrison.Glenn W. Harrison - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):303-344.
    Understanding more about how the brain functions should help us understand economic behaviour. But some would have us believe that it has done this already, and that insights from neuroscience have already provided insights in economics that we would not otherwise have. Much of this is just academic marketing hype, and to get down to substantive issues we need to identify that fluff for what it is. After we clear away the distractions, what is left? The answer is that a (...)
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  23.  12
    Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens. Jane E. Harrison and Margaret de G. Verrall.C. R. G. - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:218-220.
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  24. Mosquitoes, Malaria and Man: A History of the Hostilities Since 1880. Gordon Harrison.Margaret Pelling - 1979 - Isis 70 (4):608-608.
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  25. Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish.Karen Detlefsen - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:199-240.
    Between 1653 and 1655 Margaret Cavendish makes a radical transition in her theory of matter, rejecting her earlier atomism in favour of an infinitely-extended and infinitely-divisible material plenum, with matter being ubiquitously self-moving, sensing, and rational. It is unclear, however, if Cavendish can actually dispense of atomism. One of her arguments against atomism, for example, depends upon the created world being harmonious and orderly, a premise Cavendish herself repeatedly undermines by noting nature’s many disorders. I argue that her supposed (...)
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  26. Color in a Material World: Margaret Cavendish Against the Early Modern Mechanists.Colin Chamberlain - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (3):293-336.
    Consider the distinctive qualitative property grass visually appears to have when it visually appears to be green. This property is an example of what I call sensuous color. Whereas early modern mechanists typically argue that bodies are not sensuously colored, Margaret Cavendish disagrees. In cases of veridical perception, she holds that grass is green in precisely the way it visually appears to be. In defense of her realist approach to sensuous colors, Cavendish argues that it is impossible to conceive (...)
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  27. Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World.Karen Detlefsen - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while (...)
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  28.  57
    Into Terra Incognita: Charting Beyond Peter Harrison's the Territories of Science and Religion.Michael Fuller - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):729-741.
    Peter Harrison's The Territories of Science and Religion throws down a serious challenge to advocates of dialogue as the primary means of engagement between science and religion. This article accepts the validity of this challenge and looks at four possible responses to it. The first—a return to the past—is rejected. The remaining three—exploring new epistemic frameworks for the encounter of science and religion, broadening out the engagement beyond the context of the physical sciences and Western culture, and looking at (...)
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  29. Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today?Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):457-461.
    Before her death in 1673, Margaret Cavendish, the Duchess of Newcastle, expressed a wish that her philosophical work would experience a ‘glorious resurrection’ in future ages. During her lifetime, and for almost three centuries afterwards, her writings were destined to ‘lye still in the soft and easie Bed of Oblivion’. But more recently, Cavendish has received a measure of the fame she so desired. She is celebrated by feminists, literary theorists, and historians. There are regular conferences organised by the (...)
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  30. Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science , 2 Vols. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (1):121-125.
    Review of: Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science, 2 vols, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006, xlvii+1631, cloth $225, ISBN 0-19-924144-9. - Mind as Machine is Margaret Boden’s opus magnum. For one thing, it comes in two massive volumes of nearly 1700 pages, ... But it is not just the opus magnum in simple terms of size, but also a truly crowning achievement of half a century’s career in cognitive science.
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  31.  21
    A Critique of Victoria S. Harrison’s Internal Realist Approach to Pluralism.Daniele Bertini - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (4):1053-1068.
    Victoria S. Harrison’s theory of internal pluralism approaches religious beliefs in terms of conceptual schemes. To her, this approach has the advantage of preserving core pluralist intuitions without being challenged by the usual difficulties. My claim is that this is not the case. After providing a succinct presentation of internal pluralism, I show that the critique of traditional pluralist views such as Hick’s may also be addressed to Harrison. There are two main reasons in support of my claim. (...)
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  32.  39
    Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson.Nancy G. Slack - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. (...)
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  33.  1
    The Philosopher of Language and Religion: Remembering Margaret Chatterjee.Muzaffar Ali - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):173-177.
    This article sketches some of the main ideas that informed the work of the post-colonial Indian philosopher Margaret Chatterjee. A philosopher of language and religion, her work straddles the “frozen” traditions of the east and the west, and astutely philosophizes about Gandhian thought in the realm of religious alterity and coevality.
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  34.  35
    Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology.Graeme Smith - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233-257.
    Throughout the 1980s Margaret Thatcher dominated British and global politics. At the same time she maintained an active Christian faith, which she understood as shaping and informing her political choices and policies. In this article I argue that we can construct from Thatcher's key speeches, her memoirs, and her book on public policy a cultural "theo-political" identity which guided her political decisions. Thatcher's identity was as an Anglo-Saxon Nonconformist. This consisted of her belief in values such as thrift and (...)
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  35.  37
    Stay the Night: Meera Margaret Singh at the Gladstone Hotel.Kerry Manders - 2012 - Mediatropes 3 (2):109-132.
    This essay examines Meera Margaret Singh’s exhibition Nightingale in the time and place of the liminal space we call “hotel.” In intertexual dialogue with Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, the author not only reviews Singh’s intimate photographs of her mother, she reads the images with and against the architecture in which they are exhibited. The Gladstone as exhibition space redoubles Singh’s emphasis on the tense connectivity of apparent binaries: youth and age, public and private, artist and model, object and spectator, (...)
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  36.  1
    Will and Artifice: The Impact of Voluntarist Theology on Early-Modern Science.Francis Oakley - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (6):767-784.
    ABSTRACTThis article is in part an intervention in the ongoing debate inaugurated by Peter Harrison in 2002 when he called into question the validity of what had come by then to be called ‘the voluntarism and science thesis.’ Though it subsequently drew support from such historians of science as J.E. McGuire, Margaret Osler, Betty Jo Teeter Dobbs and, more recently, John Henry, the origins of the thesis are usually traced back to articles published in 1934–1936 and 1961 respectively (...)
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  37.  19
    Riscrivere la storia, fare la storia. Sulla donna come soggetto in Christine de Pizan e Margaret Cavendish.Paola Rudan - 2016 - Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 28 (54).
    In The City of Ladies and Bell in Campo, Christine de Pizan and Margaret Cavendish imagine women’s participation to war as a metaphor of the sexual conflict that they must fight in order to conquer their visibility in history. While Pizan rewrites history from women’s stand point and acknowledges the universal value of sexual difference for the plan of salvation, Cavendish moves within a modern frame and thinks history as the result of human action. In both cases, the tale (...)
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  38.  15
    Margaret Fell.Jacqueline Broad - 2012 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    On the strength of her 1666 pamphlet, Womens Speaking Justified, the Quaker writer Margaret Fell has been hailed as a feminist pioneer. In this short tract, Fell puts forward several arguments in favour of women's preaching. She asserts the spiritual equality of the sexes, she appeals to female exempla in the Bible, and she reinterprets key scriptural passages that appear to endorse women's subordination to men. Some scholars, however, have questioned Fell's status as a feminist thinker. They point to (...)
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  39.  68
    Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines.Jeremy MacClancy (ed.) - 2002 - University of Chicago Press.
    Since its founding in the nineteenth century, social anthropology has been seen as the study of exotic peoples in faraway places. But today more and more anthropologists are dedicating themselves not just to observing but to understanding and helping solve social problems wherever they occur--in international aid organizations, British TV studios, American hospitals, or racist enclaves in Eastern Europe, for example. In Exotic No More , an initiative of the Royal Anthropological Institute, some of today's most respected anthropologists demonstrate, in (...)
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  40. Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology.Kourken Michaelian1 - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):31 – 53.
    This paper provides a systematic reconstruction of Cavendish's general epistemology and a characterization of the fundamental role of that theory in her natural philosophy. After reviewing the outlines of her natural philosophy, I describe her treatment of 'exterior knowledge', i.e. of perception in general and of sense perception in particular. I then describe her treatment of 'interior knowledge', i.e. of self-knowledge and 'conception'. I conclude by drawing out some implications of this reconstruction for our developing understanding of Cavendish's natural philosophy.
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  41. From Meaning to Morality in Kovesi and Harrison.Alan Tapper - 2014 - In Patricia Hanna (ed.), Reality and Culture: Essays on the Philosophy of Bernard Harrison. Rodopi Press. pp. 97-112.
    The paper shows that Bernard Harrison and Julius Kovesi are complementary thinkers, interested in similar questions, and arriving at closely comparable answers. It summarizes the theory of concepts and meaning that they shared and the way they have used this theory to make sense of morality.
     
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  42. Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW]Thomas Sturm - 2001 - Metapsychology 5 (46).
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
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  43. Transfiguring America Myth, Ideology, and Mourning in Margaret Fuller's Writing.Jeffrey Steele - 2001
     
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  44. Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature.Karen Detlefsen - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world (...)
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  45. Margaret Cavendish and Thomas Hobbes on Freedom, Education, and Women.Karen Detlefsen - 2012 - In Nancy J. Hirschmann & Joanne H. Wright (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 149-168.
    In this paper, I argue that Margaret Cavendish’s account of freedom, and the role of education in freedom, is better able to account for the specifics of women’s lives than are Thomas Hobbes’ accounts of these topics. The differences between the two is grounded in their differing conceptions of the metaphysics of human nature, though the full richness of Cavendish’s approach to women, their minds and their freedom can be appreciated only if we take account of her plays, accepting (...)
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  46. Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):493-505.
    Many scholars point to the close association between early modern science and the rise of rational arguments in favour of the existence of witches. For some commentators, it is a poor reflection on science that its methods so easily lent themselves to the unjust persecution of innocent men and women. In this paper, I examine a debate about witches between a woman philosopher, Margaret Cavendish , and a fellow of the Royal Society, Joseph Glanvill . I argue that Cavendish (...)
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  47.  90
    Review of Moral Particularism (Ed. Brad Hooker and Margaret Little). [REVIEW]Pekka Väyrynen - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):478.
    This is a short review of Moral Particularism, ed. Brad Hooker and Margaret Little (Oxford University Press, 2002).
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  48.  19
    Margaret Cavendish on Motion and Mereology.Alison Peterman - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):471-499.
    what is motion, according to Margaret Cavendish? There has been a groundswell of exciting work on Cavendish’s natural philosophy lately, all of which highlights her materialism, as well as the centrality of motion in her system.1 But none of it directly addresses this question in detail. Cavendish claims that motion grounds all qualitative and quantitative variety in matter, but we will not understand her explanations of natural phenomena if we do not know what motion is.In this paper, I argue (...)
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  49.  96
    The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish by Deborah A. Boyle. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2):349-350.
    Deborah Boyle's book is a splendid addition to the literature on the philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. It provides an overview of Cavendish's philosophical work, from her panpsychist materialism, through her views about human motivation and general political philosophy, to views about gender, health, and humans' relation to the rest of the natural world. Boyle emphasizes themes of order and regularity, but does not argue that there is a strong systematic connection between Cavendish's views. Indeed, she makes a point of (...)
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  50. Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion.Deborah Boyle - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception (...)
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