Results for 'S. McNeill'

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  1. Jaggar, A. 245 Jeffreys, S. 58 Johnson, D. 182 Kamuf, P. 169, 173.D. Kellner, E. Kelly, E. Laclau, T. De Lauretis, C. MacKinnon, S. McNeill, M. Maguire, P. Major-Poeul, H. Marcuse & B. Martin - 1993 - In Caroline Ramazanoglu (ed.), Up Against Foucault: Explorations of Some Tensions Between Foucault and Feminism. Routledge. pp. 265.
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  2. Heidegger's Being and Time: Critical Essays.Jean Grondin, Karin de Boer, Graeme Nicholson, Charles Guignon, William McNeill, Günter Figal, Steven Crowell, Hubert L. Dreyfus, Daniel O. Dahlstrom, Jeffrey Andrew Bara, Theodore Kisiel & Dieter Thomä - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Heidegger's Being and Time: Critical Essays provides a variety of recent studies of Heidegger's most important work. Twelve prominent scholars, representing diverse nationalities, generations, and interpretive approaches deal with general methodological and ontological questions, particular issues in Heidegger's text, and the relation between Being and Time and Heidegger's later thought. All of the essays presented in this volume were never before available in an English-language anthology. Two of the essays have never before been published in any language ; three of (...)
     
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  3.  68
    Antigone's Autonomy.David N. McNeill - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):411 - 441.
    Abstract Sophocles' Antigone contains the first recorded instance of the word α?τ ? ?????, the source for our word ?autonomous?. I argue that reflection upon the human aspiration toward autonomy is central to that work. I begin by focusing on the difficulty readers of the play have determining whether Antigone's actions in the play should be considered autonomous and then suggest that recognizing this difficulty is crucial to a proper understanding of the play. The very aspects of Antigone's character that (...)
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  4.  81
    The Secret of Life: Explorations of Nietzsche’s Conception of Life as Will to Power.William McNeill - 2013 - Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):177-192.
    The essay presents a series of explorations of Nietzsche’s conception of life as will to power, relying extensively on fragments from Nietzsche’s later notebooks, but also commenting on key selections from Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, and On the Genealogy of Morality. I argue that Nietzsche understands himself to be engaged in a unique kind of phenomenology of the body, and that will to power, as the primal force of life, should be understood not only as a creative (...)
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  5.  30
    The Poverty of the Regent: Nietzsche’s Critique of the “Subject”.William McNeill - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):285-296.
    This essay seeks to accomplish three things: First, to examine Nietzsche’s critique of the “subject” in modern philosophy, with particular reference to Descartes.Second, to present an interpretation of Nietzsche’s alternative conception of “the subject as multiplicity.” And third, to argue that, for Nietzsche, this account of the “subject” as multiplicity does not lead to a kind of atomistic or anarchic view of the “subject,” contrary to what is often supposed. The essay focuses in particular on a number of aphorisms from (...)
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  6.  35
    Human Discourse, Eros, and Madness In Plato’s Republic.David N. McNeill - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):235 - 268.
    IN BOOK 9 OF THE REPUBLIC, Socrates tells Adeimantus that the “tyrantmakers” manage to defeat the relatives of the nascent tyrant in the battle over the young man’s soul by contriving “to make in him some eros, a sort of great winged drone, to be the leader of the idle desires.” This “leader of the soul,” Socrates claims.
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  7.  5
    The Hermeneutics of Everydayness: On the Legacy and Radicality of Heidegger's Phenomenology.William McNeill - 2010 - In Jeff Malpas & Santiago Zabala (eds.), Consequences of Hermeneutics: Fifty Years After Gadamer's Truth and Method. Northwestern University Press. pp. 98.
  8.  13
    Hölderlin's Hymns "Germania" and "the Rhine".William McNeill & Julia Ireland (eds.) - 2014 - Indiana University Press.
    Martin Heidegger’s 1934–1935 lectures on Friedrich Hölderlin’s hymns "Germania" and "The Rhine" are considered the most significant among Heidegger’s lectures on Hölderlin. Coming at a crucial time in his career, the text illustrates Heidegger’s turn toward language, art, and poetry while reflecting his despair at his failure to revolutionize the German university and his hope for a more profound revolution through the German language, guided by Hölderlin’s poetry. These lectures are important for understanding Heidegger’s changing relation to politics, his turn (...)
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  9.  36
    The Relation Between Philosophy and Religion in Blondel's Philosophy of Action.John J. McNeill - 1970 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 44:220.
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  10.  71
    How the Potato Changed the World's History.William Mcneill - 1999 - Social Research 66.
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  11. Review of Martin Heidegger, The Essence of Human Freedom: An Introduction to Philosophy and the Essence of Truth: On Plato's Cave Allegory and Theaetetus[REVIEW]William McNeill - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).
  12.  31
    Porosity: Violence and the Question of Politics in Heidegger's Introduction to Metaphysics.William McNeill - 1991 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 14 (2/1):183-212.
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  13.  34
    Robert Liddiard, Castles in Context: Power, Symbolism and Landscape, 1066–1500. Macclesfield, Eng.: Windgather Press, 2005. Paper. Pp. Xiv, 178; 70 Black-and-White and Color Figures. $35. Distributed in North America by the David Brown Book Co., P.O. Box 511, Oakville, CT 06779.Abigail Wheatley, The Idea of the Castle in Medieval England. York: York Medieval Press, in Association with Boydell and Brewer and the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, 2004. Pp. Viii, 174 Plus 17 Color Plates; 5 Black-and-White Plates. $70.Lise E. Hull, Britain's Medieval Castles. Westport, Conn., and London: Praeger, 2006. Pp. Xxvi, 219; Black-and-White Figures. $49.95. [REVIEW]Thomas E. McNeill - 2007 - Speculum 82 (2):458-460.
  14.  25
    A Wave in the Stream of Chaos: Life Beyond the Body in Heidegger’s Nietzsche.William McNeill - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):156-161.
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  15.  17
    Tarski's Theorem on Intuitionistic Logic, for Polyhedra.Nick Bezhanishvili, Vincenzo Marra, Daniel McNeill & Andrea Pedrini - 2018 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 169 (5):373-391.
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  16.  52
    Aristotle's Dialogue with Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics.David McNeill - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):299-301.
  17.  17
    Martin Buber’s Biblical Philosophy of History.John J. McNeill - 1966 - International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1):90-100.
  18.  16
    On the Concreteness of Heidegger's Thinking.William McNeill - 1992 - Philosophy Today 36 (1):83-94.
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  19.  6
    The Relation Between Philosophy and Religion in Blondel’s Philosophy of Action.John J. McNeill - 1970 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 44:220-231.
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  20. Hölderlin's Hymn « The Ister », coll. « Studies in Continental Thought ».Martin Heidegger, William Mcneill & Julia Davis - 1998 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 188 (4):506-507.
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  21. The Blondelian Synthesis a Study of the Influence of German Philosophical Sources on the Formation of Blondel's Method and Thought.John J. Mcneill - 1966 - Brill.
     
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  22.  49
    Seeing What You Want.William E. S. McNeill - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:554-564.
    There has been recent interest in the hypothesis that we can directly perceive some of each other’s mental features. One popular strategy for defending that hypothesis is to claim that some mental features are embodied in a way that makes them available to perception. Here I argue that this view would imply a particular limit on the kinds of mental feature that would be perceptible (§2). I sketch reasons for thinking that the view is not yet well-motivated (§3). And I (...)
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  23. Expressions, Looks and Others' Minds.William E. S. McNeill - forthcoming - In Matthew Parrott & Anita Avramides (eds.), Other Minds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    We can know some things about each others' mental lives. The view that some of this knowledge is genuinely perceptual is getting traction. But the idea that we can see any of each others' mental states themselves - the Simple Perceptual Hypothesis - remains unpopular. Very often the view that we can perceptually know, for example, that James is angry, is thought to depend either on our awareness of James' expression or on the way James appears - versions of what (...)
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  24.  10
    An Image of the Soul in Speech: Plato and the Problem of Socrates.David N. McNeill - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In this book, David McNeill illuminates Plato’s distinctive approach to philosophy by examining how his literary portrayal of Socrates manifests an essential interdependence between philosophic and ethical inquiry. In particular, McNeill demonstrates how Socrates’s confrontation with profound ethical questions about his public philosophic activity is the key to understanding the distinctively mimetic, dialogic, and reflexive character of Socratic philosophy. Taking a cue from Nietzsche’s account of “the problem of Socrates,” McNeill shows how the questions Nietzsche raises are (...)
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  25.  5
    China, India, and Japan: The Middle Period.Chauncey S. Goodrich, William H. Mcneill & Jean W. Sedlar - 1973 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 93 (3):419.
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  26. The Myth of the Hidden.William E. S. McNeill - 2009 - Dissertation, University College London
    Traditionally, it has been supposed that both minds and mental states are unobservable. If the mind and its contents are hidden in this way, our knowledge of others' mental lives would have to be indirect. In this thesis, I argue that it is not plausible-to suppose that all of our knowledge, of others mental lives is indirect. It is more plausible to suppose that sometimes, we can perceive others' mental states. Thereby, we can sometimes come to have direct, perceptual knowledge (...)
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  27. On Seeing That Someone is Angry.William E. S. McNeill - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):575-597.
    Abstract: Some propose that the question of how you know that James is angry can be adequately answered with the claim that you see that James is angry. Call this the Perceptual Hypothesis. Here, I examine that hypothesis. I argue that there are two different ways in which the Perceptual Hypothesis could be made true. You might see that James is angry by seeing his bodily features. Alternatively, you might see that James is angry by seeing his anger. If you (...)
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  28. Embodiment and the Perceptual Hypothesis.William E. S. McNeill - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):569 - 591.
    The Perceptual Hypothesis is that we sometimes see, and thereby have non-inferential knowledge of, others' mental features. The Perceptual Hypothesis opposes Inferentialism, which is the view that our knowledge of others' mental features is always inferential. The claim that some mental features are embodied is the claim that some mental features are realised by states or processes that extend beyond the brain. The view I discuss here is that the Perceptual Hypothesis is plausible if, but only if, the mental features (...)
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  29.  89
    The Visual Role of Objects' Facing Surfaces.William E. S. Mcneill - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):411-431.
    It is often assumed that when we see common opaque objects in standard light this is in virtue of seeing their facing surfaces. Here I argue that we should reject that claim. Either we don't see objects' facing surfaces, or—if we hold on to the claim that we do see such things—it is at least not in virtue of seeing them that we see common opaque objects. I end by showing how this conclusion squares both with our intuitions and with (...)
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  30. Inferentialism and Our Knowledge of Others’ Minds.William E. S. McNeill - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1435-1454.
    Our knowledge of each others’ mental features is sometimes epistemically basic or non-inferential. The alternative to this claim is Inferentialism, the view that such knowledge is always epistemically inferential. Here, I argue that Inferentialism is not plausible. My argument takes the form of an inference to the best explanation. Given the nature of the task involved in recognizing what mental features others have on particular occasions, and our capacity to perform that task, we should not expect always to find good (...)
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  31.  6
    Characterization of Nurses’ Duty to Care and Willingness to Report.Charleen McNeill, Danita Alfred, Tracy Nash, Jenifer Chilton & Melvin S. Swanson - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301984664.
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  32.  22
    Continental Philosophy: An Anthology.William McNeill & Karen S. Feldman (eds.) - 1998 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  33. Review of Lyons' Perception and Basic Beliefs. [REVIEW]William E. S. McNeill - forthcoming - Mind.
  34.  45
    Perception and Basic Beliefs: Zombies, Modules, and the Problem of the External World, by Jack C. Lyons. [REVIEW]W. E. S. McNeill - 2011 - Mind 120 (480):1271-1276.
    I give a brief precis of Lyons' book. I discuss the problem of delineating basic from non-basic beliefs. I argue that one of Lyons' possible solutions doesn't work - his definition of a perceptual module does not allow us to decide which beliefs are basic. And I argue that another possible solution undermines some of Lyons' motivation. The intuitive understanding of belief may not generate the Clairvoyancy troubles he fears.
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  35.  13
    Professional Values, Job Satisfaction, Career Development, and Intent to Stay.S. Yarbrough, P. Martin, D. Alfred & C. McNeill - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (6):675-685.
  36.  2
    Hölderlin’s Hymn “Remembrance,” by Martin Heidegger; Translated by William McNeill and Julia Ireland.Mélanie Walton - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (4):435-439.
  37.  70
    The Blondelian Synthesis. By John J. McNeill, S.J.Jules M. Brady - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 47 (2):251-254.
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  38.  43
    The Human Web: A Bird's-Eyeview of World History by J. R. McNeill and William H. McNeill.Jerry H. Bentley - 2005 - History and Theory 44 (1):102–112.
  39.  20
    Keeping Together in Time, or the Natural History of Social Cohesion. A Critical Evaluation of W.H. McNeill's New Book (1995). [REVIEW]K. Kortmulder - 1997 - Acta Biotheoretica 45 (1):87-91.
  40.  23
    Horace's Audience R. L. B. McNeill: Horace. Image, Identity, and Audience . Pp. Xii + 188. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001. Cased, £31.50. ISBN: 0-8018-6666-. [REVIEW]Robin Bond - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):528-.
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  41.  3
    Calendar of Archbishop Alen's Register, C. 1172-1534. Charles McNeill.Jeremiah F. O'Sullivan - 1951 - Speculum 26 (3):525-527.
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  42.  57
    Poets and Rivers: Heidegger on Hölderlin’s “Der Ister”.Julian Young - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (2):391-.
    Between 1934 and 1942 Heidegger delivered three series of lectures on Hölderlin’s poetry. The discussion of “Der Ister” was the last of these, although Heidegger continued to think and write about Hölderlin into the 1960s. William McNeill and Julia Davis’s recent translation of the “Ister”— volume —is the first of the Hölderlin lectures to appear in English.
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  43.  33
    Heidegger's "Appropriation" of Dilthey Before Being and Time.Robert C. Scharff - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):105-128.
    Heidegger's "Appropriation" of Dilthey before Being and Time ROBERT C. SCHARFF IN 199 4, in his famous Time-lecture to the Marburg Theological Society, Heidegger makes it "the first principle of all hermeneutics" that gaining access to history rests upon understanding what it means to be historical? Three years later, in Being and Time, he announces that he has achieved this understanding, for the purpose of his ontological questioning, through an "appropriation" of Dilthey's work, "confirmed and strengthened by the theses of (...)
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  44.  6
    Poets and Rivers: Heidegger on Hölderlin’s “Der Ister”.Julian Young - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (2):391-416.
    Between 1934 and 1942 Heidegger delivered three series of lectures on Hölderlin’s poetry. The discussion of “Der Ister” was the last of these, although Heidegger continued to think and write about Hölderlin into the 1960s. William McNeill and Julia Davis’s recent translation of the “Ister”— volume —is the first of the Hölderlin lectures to appear in English.
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  45.  30
    McNeill on Embodied Perception Theory.Søren Overgaard - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):135-143.
  46. Fitch's Paradox and Level-Bridging Principles.Weng Kin San - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy.
    Fitch’s Paradox shows that if every truth is knowable, then every truth is known. Standard diagnoses identify the factivity/negative infallibility of the knowledge operator and Moorean contradictions as the root source of the result. This paper generalises Fitch’s result to show that such diagnoses are mistaken. In place of factivity/negative infallibility, the weaker assumption of any ‘level-bridging principle’ suffices. A consequence is that the result holds for some logics in which the “Moorean contradiction” commonly thought to underlie the result is (...)
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  47. Prisoner's Dilemma Doesn't Explain Much.Robert Northcott & Anna Alexandrova - 2015 - In Martin Peterson (ed.), The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Classic philosophical arguments. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 64-84.
    We make the case that the Prisoner’s Dilemma, notwithstanding its fame and the quantity of intellectual resources devoted to it, has largely failed to explain any phenomena of social scientific or biological interest. In the heart of the paper we examine in detail a famous purported example of Prisoner’s Dilemma empirical success, namely Axelrod’s analysis of WWI trench warfare, and argue that this success is greatly overstated. Further, we explain why this negative verdict is likely true generally and not just (...)
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  48. Kant on Moral Agency and Women's Nature.Mari Mikkola - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (1):89-111.
    Some commentators have condemned Kant’s moral project from a feminist perspective based on Kant’s apparently dim view of women as being innately morally deficient. Here I will argue that although his remarks concerning women are unsettling at first glance, a more detailed and closer examination shows that Kant’s view of women is actually far more complex and less unsettling than that attributed to him by various feminist critics. My argument, then, undercuts the justification for the severe feminist critique of Kant’s (...)
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  49. Salvaging Pascal’s Wager.Elizabeth Jackson & Andrew Rogers - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):59-84.
    Many think that Pascal’s Wager is a hopeless failure. A primary reason for this is because a number of challenging objections have been raised to the wager, including the “many gods” objection and the “mixed strategy” objection. We argue that both objections are formal, but not substantive, problems for the wager, and that they both fail for the same reason. We then respond to additional objections to the wager. We show how a version of Pascalian reasoning succeeds, giving us a (...)
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  50.  70
    Beyond the Instinct-Inference Dichotomy: A Unified Interpretation of Peirce's Theory of Abduction.Mousa Mohammadian - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (2):138-160.
    I examine and resolve an exegetical dichotomy between two main interpretations of Peirce’s theory of abduction, namely, the Generative Interpretation and the Pursuitworthiness Interpretation. According to the former, abduction is the instinctive process of generating explanatory hypotheses through a mental faculty called insight. According to the latter, abduction is a rule-governed procedure for determining the relative pursuitworthiness of available hypotheses and adopting the worthiest one for further investigation—such as empirical tests—based on economic considerations. It is shown that the Generative Interpretation (...)
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