Results for 'Stacy Landreth Grau'

497 found
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  1.  98
    A Framework for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Programs as a Continuum: An Exploratory Study.Julie Pirsch, Shruti Gupta & Stacy Landreth Grau - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):125-140.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs are increasingly popular corporate marketing strategies. This paper argues that CSR programs can fall along a continuum between two endpoints: Institutionalized programs and Promotional programs. This classification is based on an exploratory study examining the variance of four responses from the consumer stakeholder group toward these two categories of CSR. Institutionalized CSR programs are argued to be most effective at increasing customer loyalty, enhancing attitude toward the company, and decreasing consumer skepticism. Promotional CSR programs are (...)
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  2. Love and Power: Grau and Pury (2014) as a Case Study in the Challenges of X-Phi Replication.Edouard Machery, Christopher Grau & Cynthia L. Pury - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology (4):1-17.
    Grau and Pury (Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 5, 155–168, 2014) reported that people’s views about love are related to their views about reference. This surprising effect was however not replicated in Cova et al.’s (in press) replication study. In this article, we show that the replication failure is probably due to the replication’s low power and that a metaanalytic reanalysis of the result in Cova et al. suggests that the effect reported in Grau and Pury is real. (...)
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  3.  33
    Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self.Stacy Alaimo (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    How do we understand the agency and significance of material forces and their interface with human bodies? What does it mean to be human in these times, with bodies that are inextricably interconnected with our physical world? Bodily Natures considers these questions by grappling with powerful and pervasive material forces and their increasingly harmful effects on the human body. Drawing on feminist theory, environmental studies, and the sciences, Stacy Alaimo focuses on trans-corporeality, or movement across bodies and nature, which (...)
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  4.  64
    Notions of Nothing.Stacie Friend - 2014 - In Empty Representations: Reference and Non-Existence.
    Book synopsis: New work on a hot topic by an outstanding team of authors At the intersection of several central areas of philosophy It is the linguistic job of singular terms to pick out the objects that we think or talk about. But what about singular terms that seem to fail to designate anything, because the objects they refer to don't exist? We can employ these terms in meaningful thought and talk, which suggests that they are succeeding in fulfilling their (...)
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  5.  92
    Fiction and Emotion.Stacie Friend - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. New York: Routledge. pp. 217-229.
    Engagement with fiction often inspires emotional responses. We may pity Sethe while feeling ambivalent about her actions (in Beloved), fear for Ellen Ripley as she battles monstrous creatures (in Alien), get angry at Okonkwo for killing Ikemefuna (in Things Fall Apart), and hope that Kiyoaki and Satoko find love (in Spring Snow). Familiar as they are, these reactions are puzzling. Why do I respond emotionally if I do not believe that these individuals exist or that the events occurred? If I (...)
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  6.  43
    Material Feminisms.Stacy Alaimo & Susan Hekman (eds.) - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    By insisting on the importance of materiality, this volume breaks new ground in philosophy, feminist theory, cultural studies, science studies, and other fields where the body and nature collide.
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  7. Imagining Fact and Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2008 - In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 150-169.
  8.  34
    Cyborg and Ecofeminist Interventions: Challenges for an Environmental Feminism.Stacy Alaimo - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (1):133.
  9. Feminism, Domesticity, and Popular Culture.Stacy Gillis & Joanne Hollows - 2010 - In Ann Brooks (ed.), Social Theory in Contemporary Asia. Routledge.
  10. New Materialisms.Stacy Alaimo - 2020 - In Sherryl Vint (ed.), After the Human: Culture, Theory and Criticism in the 21st Century. Cambridge University Press.
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  11. ReNorming Immigration Court.Stacy Caplow - 2008 - Nexus 13:85.
     
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  12. Philosophers on Film: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.Christopher Grau (ed.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    This is the first book to explore and address the philosophical aspects of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Beginning with a helpful introduction that places each essay in context, specially commissioned chapters examine the following topics: -/- * Philosophical issues surrounding love, friendship, affirmation and repetition * The role of memory (and the emotions) in personal identity and decision-making * The morality of imagination and ethical importance of memory * Philosophical questions about self-knowledge and knowing the minds of others (...)
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  13. The Wixárika (Huichol) Altar : Place of the Souls, Stairway of the Sun.Stacy B. Schaefer - 2003 - In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
     
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  14.  31
    Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space.Stacy Alaimo - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    In Undomesticated Ground, Stacy Alaimo issues a bold call to reclaim nature as feminist space.
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  15. Believing in Stories.Stacie Friend - 2014 - In Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. Oxford University Press. pp. 227-248.
    Book synopsis: The most debated issue in aesthetics today Written by an international team of leading experts Addresses growing methodological concerns in the field Includes an extensive introduction which illuminates key issues Through much of the twentieth century, philosophical thinking about works of art, design, and other aesthetic products has emphasized intuitive and reflective methods, often tied to the idea that philosophy's business is primarily to analyze concepts. This 'philosophy from the armchair' approach contrasts with methods used by psychologists, sociologists, (...)
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  16.  6
    Ecofeminism and the Science Classroom: A Practical Approach.Stacy K. Zell - 1998 - Science & Education 7 (2):143-158.
  17.  59
    Neuroeconomics, Neurophysiology and the Common Currency Hypothesis.Anthony Landreth & John Bickle - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):419-429.
    We briefly describe ways in which neuroeconomics has made contributions to its contributing disciplines, especially neuroscience, and a specific way in which it could make future contributions to both. The contributions of a scientific research programme can be categorized in terms of (1) description and classification of phenomena, (2) the discovery of causal relationships among those phenomena, and (3) the development of tools to facilitate (1) and (2). We consider ways in which neuroeconomics has advanced neuroscience and economics along each (...)
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  18. The Emerging Theory of Motivation.Andrew Landreth - 2009 - In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 381--418.
  19.  97
    Localization and the New Phrenology: A Review Essay on William Uttal's the New Phrenology. [REVIEW]Anthony Landreth & Robert C. Richardson - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):107-123.
    William Uttal's The new phrenology is a broad attack on localization in cognitive neuroscience. He argues that even though the brain is a highly differentiated organ, "high level cognitive functions" should not be localized in specific brain regions. First, he argues that psychological processes are not well-defined. Second, he criticizes the methods used to localize psychological processes, including imaging technology: he argues that variation among individuals compromises localization, and that the statistical methods used to construct activation maps are flawed. Neither (...)
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  20. Memory Permanence Versus Memory Replacement in Sentence Recall.Stacy Lynette Birch & W. F. Brewer - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):526-526.
     
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  21. Toshio Shibata.Staci Boris - 1998 - Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.
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  22. NEWS-For a New Europe: University Struggles Against Austerity.Stacy Douglas - 2011 - Radical Philosophy 167:63.
     
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  23. Stacy Alaimo and Susan Hekman, Eds. Material Feminisms Reviewed By.Sally Hart - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (2):79-82.
     
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  24. Stacy Alaimo and Susan Hekman, Eds., Material Feminisms.Sally Hart - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (2):79.
     
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  25. The Real Foundation of Fictional Worlds.Stacie Friend - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):29-42.
    I argue that judgments of what is ‘true in a fiction’ presuppose the Reality Assumption: the assumption that everything that is true is fictionally the case, unless excluded by the work. By contrast with the more familiar Reality Principle, the Reality Assumption is not a rule for inferring implied content from what is explicit. Instead, it provides an array of real-world truths that can be used in such inferences. I claim that the Reality Assumption is essential to our ability to (...)
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  26.  30
    Contesting the Cartography of Sovereignty: Rifkin's Erotics of Sovereignty.Stacy Douglas - forthcoming - Theory and Event 15 (3).
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  27. Fiction as a Genre.Stacie Friend - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179--209.
    Standard theories define fiction in terms of an invited response of imagining or make-believe. I argue that these theories are not only subject to numerous counterexamples, they also fail to explain why classification matters to our understanding and evaluation of works of fiction as well as non-fiction. I propose instead that we construe fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a cluster of nonessential criteria, and which play a role in the appreciation of particular works. I (...)
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  28.  6
    The Meaning of Informed Consent: Genome Editing Clinical Trials for Sickle Cell Disease.Stacy Desine, Brittany M. Hollister, Khadijah E. Abdallah, Anitra Persaud, Sara Chandros Hull & Vence L. Bonham - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (4):195-207.
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  29. Is There A Specific Experience of Thinking?Marta Jorba Grau - 2010 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 25 (2):187-196.
    In this paper I discuss whether there is a specific experience of thinking or not. I address this question by analysing if it is possible to reduce the phenomenal character of thinking to the phenomenal character of sensory experiences. My purpose is to defend that there is a specific phenomenality for at least some thinking mental states. I present Husserl's theory of intentionality in the Logical Investigations as a way to defend this claim and I consider its assumptions. Then I (...)
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  30.  1
    Book Review: Teaching with Feminist Materialisms. [REVIEW]Stacy Alaimo - 2017 - Feminist Review 115 (1):178-179.
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  31. Fictional Characters.Stacie Friend - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):141–156.
    If there are no fictional characters, how do we explain thought and discourse apparently about them? If there are, what are they like? A growing number of philosophers claim that fictional characters are abstract objects akin to novels or plots. They argue that postulating characters provides the most straightforward explanation of our literary practices as well as a uniform account of discourse and thought about fiction. Anti-realists counter that postulation is neither necessary nor straightforward, and that the invocation of pretense (...)
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  32.  13
    A Definition and Ethical Evaluation of Overdiagnosis.Stacy M. Carter, Chris Degeling, Jenny Doust & Alexandra Barratt - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (11):705-714.
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  33. Cuerpo vivido. [REVIEW]Marta Jorba-Grau - 2011 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 8:217-224.
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  34. The Great Beetle Debate: A Study in Imagining with Names.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (2):183-211.
    Statements about fictional characters, such as “Gregor Samsa has been changed into a beetle,” pose the problem of how we can say something true (or false) using empty names. I propose an original solution to this problem that construes such utterances as reports of the “prescriptions to imagine” generated by works of fiction. In particular, I argue that we should construe these utterances as specifying, not what we are supposed to imagine—the propositional object of the imagining—but how we are supposed (...)
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  35. Confusion, Cost, and Emotion Research.Anthony Landreth - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):373-374.
    The inferences that can be drawn from Izard’s article are unclear. Izard (2010) suggests that his data raise questions concerning inconsistencies, confusion, and costs in emotion research. I suggest that his data do not speak to the issues of confusion and costs, and that the choice of distinguished scientists may have been inappropriate to meet the goals of Izard’s study. Of course, questions concerning the efficiency of research in emotion studies are interesting. I describe more appropriate ways of addressing such (...)
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  36. The Philosophy of Neuroscience.John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth - 2006 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain structure and function suggest (...)
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  37.  4
    ‘Overflown Bodies’ as Critical-Political Transformations.Begonya Enguix Grau - 2020 - Feminist Theory 21 (4):465-481.
    In order to explore the political and transformative potential of bodies in relation to gender and affects, I discuss how bodies, gender and politics are entangled through the figuration of ‘overflown bodies’. Departing from a material-discursive feminist conceptualisation of bodies, ‘overflown bodies’ are assemblages embedded in complex relationships of matter, discourse, emotions, affects, ideologies, protest, norms, values, relations, practices, expectations and other possibilities of social and political action. Three ethnographic cases illustrate how ‘overflown bodies’ assemble matter and discourse, and how (...)
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  38.  11
    A Definition and Ethical Evaluation of Overdiagnosis: Response to Commentaries.Stacy M. Carter, Chris Degeling, Jenny Doust & Alexandra Barratt - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (11):722-724.
    Overdiagnosis is an emerging problem in health policy and practice: we address its definition and ethical implications. We argue that the definition of overdiagnosis should be expressed at the level of populations. Consider a condition prevalent in a population, customarily labelled with diagnosis A. We propose that overdiagnosis is occurring in respect of that condition in that population when the condition is being identified and labelled with diagnosis A in that population ; this identification and labelling would be accepted as (...)
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  39. This Heaven Gives Me Migraines”: The Problems and Promise of Landscapes of Leisure.Stacy Warren - 1993 - In S. James & David Ley (eds.), Place/Culture/Representation. Routledge. pp. 173--86.
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  40.  48
    "The Look" in Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness.Stacy Monahan - 2004 - Semiotics:98-106.
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  41.  29
    The Irish.Helen Landreth - 1950 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 25 (1):132-133.
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  42.  2
    Judgements of Co-Identification.Stacie Friend - forthcoming - In Alex Grzankowski & Anthony Savile (eds.), Thought: its Origins and Reach. Essays for Mark Sainsbury. London, UK:
    A popular way for irrealists to explain co-identification—thinking and talking ‘about the same thing’ when there is no such thing—is by appeal to causal, historical or informational chains, networks or practices. Recently, however, this approach has come under attack by philosophers who contend that it cannot provide necessary and/or sufficient conditions for co-identification. In this paper I defend the approach against these objections. My claim is not that the appeal to such practices can provide necessary and sufficient conditions for co-identification, (...)
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  43.  45
    Categories of LiteratureSymposium: “Categories of Art” at 50.Stacie Friend - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):70-74.
    Kendall Walton’s “Categories of Art” (1970) is one of the most important and influential papers in twentieth-century aesthetics. It is almost universally taken to refute traditional aesthetic formalism/empiricism, according to which all that matters aesthetically is what is manifest to perception. Most commentators assume that the argument of “Categories” applies to works of literature. Walton himself notes a word of caution: “The aesthetic properties of works of literature are not happily called ‘perceptual’ … (The notion of perceiving a work in (...)
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  44.  38
    Hume's Impressions of Belief.Stacy J. Hansen - 1988 - Hume Studies 14 (2):277-304.
  45.  20
    Beware Dichotomies and Grand Abstractions: Attending to Particularity and Practice in Empirical Bioethics.Stacy M. Carter - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):76-77.
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  46. Fictive Utterance And Imagining II.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an adequate criterion (...)
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  47.  13
    Feminist Disability Studies as Methodology: Life-Writing and the Abled/Disabled Binary.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Feminist Review 115 (1):46-60.
    What does feminist disability studies contribute to feminist methods? Feminist disability scholars interweave life-writing about their experiences of disability or caring for a disabled person to challenge ableist stereotypes. As such, they foreground their own vulnerability to build disability identity and community. This style of life-writing, while essential, tends to calcify the dichotomy between the disabled and abled—a binary that the field of feminist disability studies aims to destabilise. Building on new work in feminist disability studies, I show how some (...)
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  48.  79
    Fiction and Emotion: The Puzzle of Divergent Norms.Stacie Friend - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (4):403-418.
    A familiar question in the literature on emotional responses to fiction, originally put forward by Colin Radford, is how such responses can be rational. How can we make sense of pitying Anna Karenina when we know there is no such person? In this paper I argue that contrary to the usual interpretation, the question of rationality has nothing to do with the Paradox of Fiction. Instead, the real problem is why there is a divergence in our normative assessments of emotions (...)
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  49.  9
    How I Really Feel About JFK.Stacie Friend - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 35-53.
    The most well-known and controversial solution to the paradox of fiction is Kendall Walton’s, according to whom pity of (say) Anna Karenina is not genuine pity. Walton’s opponents argue that we can resolve the paradox of fiction while preserving the intuition that our response to Anna is ordinary, run-of-the-mill pity; and they claim that retaining this intuition explains more than Walton’s approach. In my view, the arguments of Walton’s opponents depend on idiosyncratic features of examples involving purely fictional characters like (...)
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  50.  12
    Fictionality in Imagined Worlds.Stacie Friend - 2021 - In Sonia Sedivy (ed.), Art, Representation and Make-Believe: Essays on the Philosophy of Kendall L. Walton. New York, NY, USA: pp. 25-40.
    What does it mean for a proposition to be "true in a fiction"? According to the account offered by Kendall Walton in Mimesis as Make-Believe (1990), what is fictionally true, or simply fictional, is what a work of fiction invites or prescribes that we imagine. To say that it is fictional that Okonkwo kills Ikemefuna in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, for example, is to say that we are supposed to imagine that event. Yet Walton gives no account of the (...)
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