Results for 'Stacy Landreth Grau'

466 found
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  1.  96
    A Framework for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Programs as a Continuum: An Exploratory Study.Julie Pirsch, Shruti Gupta & Stacy Landreth Grau - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):125-140.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs are increasingly popular corporate marketing strategies. This paper argues that CSR programs can fall along a continuum between two endpoints: Institutionalized programs and Promotional programs. This classification is based on an exploratory study examining the variance of four responses from the consumer stakeholder group toward these two categories of CSR. Institutionalized CSR programs are argued to be most effective at increasing customer loyalty, enhancing attitude toward the company, and decreasing consumer skepticism. Promotional CSR programs are (...)
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  2. Love and Power: Grau and Pury (2014) as a Case Study in the Challenges of X-Phi Replication.Edouard Machery, Christopher Grau & Cynthia L. Pury - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology (4):1-17.
    Grau and Pury (Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 5, 155–168, 2014) reported that people’s views about love are related to their views about reference. This surprising effect was however not replicated in Cova et al.’s (in press) replication study. In this article, we show that the replication failure is probably due to the replication’s low power and that a metaanalytic reanalysis of the result in Cova et al. suggests that the effect reported in Grau and Pury is real. (...)
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  3.  33
    Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self.Stacy Alaimo (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    How do we understand the agency and significance of material forces and their interface with human bodies? What does it mean to be human in these times, with bodies that are inextricably interconnected with our physical world? Bodily Natures considers these questions by grappling with powerful and pervasive material forces and their increasingly harmful effects on the human body. Drawing on feminist theory, environmental studies, and the sciences, Stacy Alaimo focuses on trans-corporeality, or movement across bodies and nature, which (...)
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  4.  40
    Material Feminisms.Stacy Alaimo & Susan Hekman (eds.) - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    By insisting on the importance of materiality, this volume breaks new ground in philosophy, feminist theory, cultural studies, science studies, and other fields where the body and nature collide.
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  5. The Real Foundation of Fictional Worlds.Stacie Friend - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):29-42.
    I argue that judgments of what is ‘true in a fiction’ presuppose the Reality Assumption: the assumption that everything that is true is fictionally the case, unless excluded by the work. By contrast with the more familiar Reality Principle, the Reality Assumption is not a rule for inferring implied content from what is explicit. Instead, it provides an array of real-world truths that can be used in such inferences. I claim that the Reality Assumption is essential to our ability to (...)
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  6. Imagining Fact and Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2008 - In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 150-169.
  7. Fiction as a Genre.Stacie Friend - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179--209.
    Standard theories define fiction in terms of an invited response of imagining or make-believe. I argue that these theories are not only subject to numerous counterexamples, they also fail to explain why classification matters to our understanding and evaluation of works of fiction as well as non-fiction. I propose instead that we construe fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a cluster of nonessential criteria, and which play a role in the appreciation of particular works. I (...)
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  8. Fictional Characters.Stacie Friend - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):141–156.
    If there are no fictional characters, how do we explain thought and discourse apparently about them? If there are, what are they like? A growing number of philosophers claim that fictional characters are abstract objects akin to novels or plots. They argue that postulating characters provides the most straightforward explanation of our literary practices as well as a uniform account of discourse and thought about fiction. Anti-realists counter that postulation is neither necessary nor straightforward, and that the invocation of pretense (...)
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  9. The Great Beetle Debate: A Study in Imagining with Names.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (2):183-211.
    Statements about fictional characters, such as “Gregor Samsa has been changed into a beetle,” pose the problem of how we can say something true (or false) using empty names. I propose an original solution to this problem that construes such utterances as reports of the “prescriptions to imagine” generated by works of fiction. In particular, I argue that we should construe these utterances as specifying, not what we are supposed to imagine—the propositional object of the imagining—but how we are supposed (...)
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  10.  45
    Notions of Nothing.Stacie Friend - 2014 - In Empty Representations: Reference and Non-Existence.
    Book synopsis: New work on a hot topic by an outstanding team of authors At the intersection of several central areas of philosophy It is the linguistic job of singular terms to pick out the objects that we think or talk about. But what about singular terms that seem to fail to designate anything, because the objects they refer to don't exist? We can employ these terms in meaningful thought and talk, which suggests that they are succeeding in fulfilling their (...)
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  11.  58
    Neuroeconomics, Neurophysiology and the Common Currency Hypothesis.Anthony Landreth & John Bickle - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):419-429.
    We briefly describe ways in which neuroeconomics has made contributions to its contributing disciplines, especially neuroscience, and a specific way in which it could make future contributions to both. The contributions of a scientific research programme can be categorized in terms of (1) description and classification of phenomena, (2) the discovery of causal relationships among those phenomena, and (3) the development of tools to facilitate (1) and (2). We consider ways in which neuroeconomics has advanced neuroscience and economics along each (...)
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  12. Believing in Stories.Stacie Friend - 2014 - In Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. Oxford University Press. pp. 227-248.
    Book synopsis: The most debated issue in aesthetics today Written by an international team of leading experts Addresses growing methodological concerns in the field Includes an extensive introduction which illuminates key issues Through much of the twentieth century, philosophical thinking about works of art, design, and other aesthetic products has emphasized intuitive and reflective methods, often tied to the idea that philosophy's business is primarily to analyze concepts. This 'philosophy from the armchair' approach contrasts with methods used by psychologists, sociologists, (...)
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  13.  12
    A Definition and Ethical Evaluation of Overdiagnosis.Stacy M. Carter, Chris Degeling, Jenny Doust & Alexandra Barratt - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (11):705-714.
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  14.  83
    Fiction and Emotion.Stacie Friend - 2016 - In .
    Book synopsis: Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics.
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  15.  30
    Categories of Literature.Stacie Friend - 2020 - Wiley: The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1).
    The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 70-74, Winter 2020.
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  16. Fictive Utterance And Imagining II.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an adequate criterion (...)
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  17.  24
    Making Disability Public in Deliberative Democracy.Stacy Clifford - 2012 - Contemporary Political Theory 11 (2):211-228.
  18.  95
    Localization and the New Phrenology: A Review Essay on William Uttal's the New Phrenology. [REVIEW]Anthony Landreth & Robert C. Richardson - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):107-123.
    William Uttal's The new phrenology is a broad attack on localization in cognitive neuroscience. He argues that even though the brain is a highly differentiated organ, "high level cognitive functions" should not be localized in specific brain regions. First, he argues that psychological processes are not well-defined. Second, he criticizes the methods used to localize psychological processes, including imaging technology: he argues that variation among individuals compromises localization, and that the statistical methods used to construct activation maps are flawed. Neither (...)
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  19. Getting Carried Away: Evaluating the Emotional Influence of Fiction Film.Stacie Friend - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):77-105.
    It is widely taken for granted that fictions, including both literature and film,influence our attitudes toward real people, events, and situations. Philosopherswho defend claims about the cognitive value of fiction view this influence in apositive light, while others worry about the potential moral danger of fiction.Marketers hope that visual and aural references to their products in movies willhave an effect on people’s buying patterns. Psychologists study the persuasiveimpact of media. Educational books and films are created in the hopes of guidingchildren’s (...)
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  20.  28
    Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space.Stacy Alaimo - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    In Undomesticated Ground, Stacy Alaimo issues a bold call to reclaim nature as feminist space.
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  21. The Philosophy of Neuroscience.John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth - 2006 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain structure and function suggest (...)
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  22.  9
    A Definition and Ethical Evaluation of Overdiagnosis: Response to Commentaries.Stacy M. Carter, Chris Degeling, Jenny Doust & Alexandra Barratt - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (11):722-724.
    Overdiagnosis is an emerging problem in health policy and practice: we address its definition and ethical implications. We argue that the definition of overdiagnosis should be expressed at the level of populations. Consider a condition prevalent in a population, customarily labelled with diagnosis A. We propose that overdiagnosis is occurring in respect of that condition in that population when the condition is being identified and labelled with diagnosis A in that population ; this identification and labelling would be accepted as (...)
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  23. The Pleasures of Documentary Tragedy.Stacie Friend - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):184-198.
    Two assumptions are common in discussions of the paradox of tragedy: (1) that tragic pleasure requires that the work be fictional or, if non-fiction, then non-transparently represented; and (2) that tragic pleasure may be provoked by a wide variety of art forms. In opposition to (1) I argue that certain documentaries could produce tragic pleasure. This is not to say that any sad or painful documentary could do so. In considering which documentaries might be plausible candidates, I further argue, against (...)
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  24.  70
    Liabilities of Queer Anti-Racist Critique.Stacy Douglas, Suhraiya Jivraj & Sarah Lamble - 2011 - Feminist Legal Studies 19 (2):107-118.
  25.  30
    Cyborg and Ecofeminist Interventions: Challenges for an Environmental Feminism.Stacy Alaimo - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (1):133.
  26.  20
    Beware Dichotomies and Grand Abstractions: Attending to Particularity and Practice in Empirical Bioethics.Stacy M. Carter - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):76-77.
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  27.  26
    Reference in Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):179-206.
    Most discussions of proper names in fiction concern the names of fictional characters, such as ‘Clarissa Dalloway’ or ‘Lilliput.’ Less attention has been paid to referring names in fiction, such as ‘Napoleon’ or ‘London’. This is because many philosophers simply assume that such names are unproblematic; they refer in the usual way to their ordinary referents. The alternative position, dubbed Exceptionalism by Manuel García-Carpintero, maintains that referring names make a distinctive semantic contribution in fiction. In this paper I offer a (...)
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  28.  15
    The Choreography of Group Affiliation.Jorina Zimmermann, Staci Vicary, Matthias Sperling, Guido Orgs & Daniel C. Richardson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):80-94.
    When two people move in synchrony, they become more social. Yet it is not clear how this effect scales up to larger numbers of people. Does a group need to move in unison to affiliate, in what we term unitary synchrony; or does affiliation arise from distributed coordination, patterns of coupled movements between individual members of a group? We developed choreographic tasks that manipulated movement synchrony without explicitly instructing groups to move in unison. Wrist accelerometers measured group movement dynamics and (...)
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  29. Confusion, Cost, and Emotion Research.Anthony Landreth - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):373-374.
    The inferences that can be drawn from Izard’s article are unclear. Izard (2010) suggests that his data raise questions concerning inconsistencies, confusion, and costs in emotion research. I suggest that his data do not speak to the issues of confusion and costs, and that the choice of distinguished scientists may have been inappropriate to meet the goals of Izard’s study. Of course, questions concerning the efficiency of research in emotion studies are interesting. I describe more appropriate ways of addressing such (...)
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  30.  3
    Methodological Challenges in Deliberative Empirical Ethics.Stacy M. Carter - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):382-383.
    The empirical turn in bioethics and the deliberative turn in democracy theory occurred at around the same time, one at the intersection of bioethics and social science,1 2 the other at the intersection of political philosophy and political science.3–5 Empirical bioethics and deliberative democratic approaches both engage with immediate problems in policy and practice with normative intent, so it was perhaps inevitable that they would eventually find one another,6–8 and that deliberative research would become more common in bioethics.9 This commentary (...)
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  31.  5
    Feminist Disability Studies as Methodology: Life-Writing and the Abled/Disabled Binary.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Feminist Review 115 (1):46-60.
    What does feminist disability studies contribute to feminist methods? Feminist disability scholars interweave life-writing about their experiences of disability or caring for a disabled person to challenge ableist stereotypes. As such, they foreground their own vulnerability to build disability identity and community. This style of life-writing, while essential, tends to calcify the dichotomy between the disabled and abled—a binary that the field of feminist disability studies aims to destabilise. Building on new work in feminist disability studies, I show how some (...)
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  32.  3
    Categories of LiteratureSymposium: “Categories of Art” at 50.Stacie Friend - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):70-74.
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  33.  9
    Examining How Professional Development Impacted Teachers and Students of U.S. History Courses.Stacy Duffield, Justin Wageman & Angela Hodge - 2013 - Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (2):85-96.
  34.  23
    Valuing Healthcare Improvement: Implicit Norms, Explicit Normativity, and Human Agency.Stacy Carter - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):189-205.
    I argue that greater attention to human agency and normativity in both researching and practicing service improvement may be one strategy for enhancing improvement science, illustrating with examples from cancer screening. Improvement science tends to deliberately avoid explicit normativity, for paradigmatically coherent reasons. But there are good reasons to consider including explicit normativity in thinking about improvement. Values and moral judgements are central to social life, so an adequate account of social life must include these elements. And improvement itself is (...)
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  35.  13
    Revisiting the Continental Shelf: Moira Gatens on Law, Religion, and Human Rights in Eliot, Feuerbach, and Spinoza. [REVIEW]Stacy Douglas & Moira Gatens - 2011 - Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):75-82.
  36.  25
    Ubuntu Versus Ubuntu: Finding a Philosophy of Justice Through Obligation: Praeg, Leonhard: A Report on Ubuntu, University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg, 2014.Stacy Douglas - 2015 - Law and Critique 26 (3):305-312.
    Leonhard Praeg’s A Report on Ubuntu is a clever, if dense, treatise about the potential of Ubuntu as an emancipatory concept in the context of adjudication because of its function as a persistent demand to re-ask the question: ‘what is justice?’. The book is a welcome defense of Ubuntu and a mesmerizing synthesis of existing literatures that, in combination, point to the transformative potential of Ubuntu as it may be deployed in adjudication in South African court cases. However, the ultimate (...)
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  37.  36
    Hume's Impressions of Belief.Stacy J. Hansen - 1988 - Hume Studies 14 (2):277-304.
  38. Hermeneutic Moral Fictionalism as an Anti-Realist Strategy.Stacie Friend - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (1):14-22.
  39.  8
    Cortical Organization of Inhibition-Related Functions and Modulation by Psychopathology.Stacie L. Warren, Laura D. Crocker, Jeffery M. Spielberg, Anna S. Engels, Marie T. Banich, Bradley P. Sutton, Gregory A. Miller & Wendy Heller - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  40.  80
    Elucidating the Truth in Criticism.Stacie Friend - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):387-399.
    Analytic aesthetics has had little to say about academic schools of criticism, such as Freudian, Marxist, feminist, or postcolonial perspectives. Historicists typically view their interpretations as anachronistic; non-historicists assess all interpretations according to formalist criteria. Insofar as these strategies treat these interpretations as on a par, however, they are inadequate. For the theories that ground the interpretations differ in the claims they make about the world. I argue that the interpretations of different critical schools can be evaluated according to the (...)
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  41.  5
    Best Practices for Teaching Public Health Law: Two Online Resource Libraries.Stacie P. Kershner - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (s1):93-96.
    Georgia State University College of Law, through the Center for Law, Health & Society, developed a pair of online libraries for faculty teaching public health law in schools of law or public health. Development of these libraries was funded by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as part of The Future of Public Health Law Education: Faculty Fellowship Program. This article describes the goals of the program addressed by the libraries, the development process, the resources included, and how (...)
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  42.  3
    Debating Diversity: A Commentary on Standards of Practice in Empirical Bioethics Research.Stacy M. Carter - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):67.
    This article provides a commentary on Standards of practice in empirical bioethics research by Ives and colleagues. There is much to admire in the paper, and in the demanding consensus-building process on which it reports. I discuss the problems and limits of methodological standardisation, and a central conceptual tension that appears to have divided participants. I suggest that the finished product should be understood as a record of a methodological conversation, rather than being used as a disciplinary tool to limit (...)
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  43.  24
    Demonstrating “Reasonable Fear” at Trial: Is It Science or Junk Science?Stacy Lee Burns - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (2):107-131.
    This paper explores how scientific knowledge is used in a criminal case. I examine materials from an admissibility hearing in a murder trial and discuss the dynamics of contesting expert scientific opinion and evidence. The research finds that a purported form of "science" in the relevant scientific community is filtered through, tested by, and subjected to legal standards, conceptions, and procedures for determining admissibility. The paper details how the opposing lawyers, the expert witness, and the judge vie to contingently work (...)
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  44. Love and History.Christopher Grau - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):246-271.
    In this essay, I argue that a proper understanding of the historicity of love requires an appreciation of the irreplaceability of the beloved. I do this through a consideration of ideas that were first put forward by Robert Kraut in “Love De Re” (1986). I also evaluate Amelie Rorty's criticisms of Kraut's thesis in “The Historicity of Psychological Attitudes: Love is Not Love Which Alters Not When It Alteration Finds” (1986). I argue that Rorty fundamentally misunderstands Kraut's Kripkean analogy, and (...)
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  45.  15
    Agency Vulnerability, Participation, and the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples.Stacy J. Kosko - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (3):293-310.
    Journal of Global Ethics, Volume 9, Issue 3, Page 293-310, December 2013.
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  46.  26
    Shared Health Governance: The Potential Danger of Oppressive “Healthism”.Stacy M. Carter, Vikki Ann Entwistle, Kirsten McCaffery & Lucie Rychetnik - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):57 - 59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 57-59, July 2011.
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  47. Philosophers Explore the Matrix.Christopher Grau (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The Matrix trilogy is unique among recent popular films in that it is constructed around important philosophical questions--classic questions which have fascinated philosophers and other thinkers for thousands of years. Editor Christopher Grau here presents a collection of new, intriguing essays about some of the powerful and ancient questions broached by The Matrix and its sequels, written by some of the most prominent and reputable philosophers working today. They provide intelligent, accessible, and thought-provoking examinations of the philosophical issues that (...)
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  48.  8
    The Ethics of Air: Technology and the Question of Sexual Difference.Stacy Keltner - 2001 - Philosophy Today 45 (Supplement):53-65.
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  49.  4
    Moral Elevation and Economic Games: The Moderating Role of Personality.Rico Pohling, Rhett Diessner, Shawnee Stacy, Destiny Woodward & Anja Strobel - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  50.  4
    Function Follows Form: Activation of Shape and Function Features During Object Identification.Eiling Yee, Stacy Huffstetler & Sharon L. Thompson-Schill - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (3):348-363.
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