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  1. Matthew R. Dasti (2013). The Six Systems. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    This is a select annotated bibliography of literature on the famous Six Systems of orthodox Hindu philosophy.
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  2. Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.) (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    If one were to make a list of the leading topics of debate in classical Indian philosophy, contenders might include the existence and nature of the self; the fundamental sources of knowledge; the nature of the engagement between consciousness and reality; the existence and nature of God/Brahman; the proper account of causation; the relationship between language and the world; the practices that best ensure future happiness; the most expedient method for any soteriological attainment (or not); or the fundamental constituents of (...)
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  3. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  4. Marzenna Jakubczak (2014). The Purpose of Non-Theistic Devotion in the Classical Indian Tradition of Sāṃkhya–Yoga. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 4 (1):55-68.
    The paper starts with some textual distinctions concerning the concept of God in the metaphysical framework of two classical schools of Hindu philosophy, Sāṃkhya and Yoga. Then the author focuses on the functional and pedagogical aspects of prayer as well as practical justification of “religious meditation” in both philosophical schools. A special attention is put on the practice called īśvarapraṇidhāna, recommended in Yoga school, which is interpreted by the author as a form of non-theistic devotion. The meaning of the central (...)
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  5. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). Przyroda w filozofii i kulturze Indii. Kultura Współczesna (1):171-182.
    W artykule rozważane są rozmaite semantyczne i symboliczne relacje, w jakich ujmuje się przyrodę na gruncie filozofii, kosmologii i estetyki indyjskiej. Punktem wyjścia jest charakterystyka wewnętrznej dynamiki przyrody, w którą wpisane jest nieustanne zderzanie się biegunowych jakości. Przedstawione są m.in. wedyjskie kosmogoniczne rozważania, konstatujące samorodność i substancjalną jednorodność cyklicznej natury, oraz pięć reprezentatywnych filozoficznych koncepcji przyrody. Autorka podkreśla także swoistą współzależność pomiędzy afirmowaną wizją przyrody a kulturowymi reprezentacjami natury ludzkiej.
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  6. Marzenna Jakubczak (2005). Yoga: The Indian Tradition (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (2):353-358.
                      Book review: Yoga: The Indian Tradition. Edited by Ian Whicher and David Carpenter. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, Pp. xii + 206     -/-  .
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  7. Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Book Review Pages From the Past: Part 1 by Rameshwar Tantia. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (2):338.
    This slim yet elegant volume begins with accounts of Cicero and Alexander, and continues with the story of a millionaire who wanted to save for the next six generations, a rich man who broke caste barriers through a meal, a farmer who protected his cows transcending religious boundaries, a widow who lived frugally to save for digging a well in her village, dacoits who were more conscious of their reputation than others, a simpleton but generous person who gave up his (...)
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  8. Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Saraswati–Attaining Self Dominion 21. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (4):421–2.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  9. Swami Narasimhananda (2016). The Phalaharini Kali. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (1):9-22.
    An interpretation of Kali and the explanation of the absence of a Devil in Hinduism or Sanatana Dharma. This paper shows how there is no 'dichotomy of divinity' in Hinduism. The social, cultural, and spiritual implication of the iconography of Kali is also discussed in the light of women and gender studies.
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  10. Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Tripura Upanishad. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (1):1-8.
    Tripura Upanishad is a minor Shakta or Tantra Upanishad explaining the structure of and meditation on Sri Chakra or Sri Yantra—a diagrammatic representation of the universe through nine interlocking triangles coming out of a central point. To date, there are two English translations of this Upanishad. The first and the earliest, by A G Krishna Warrier done in 1967, is a verse translation and because of the obvious constraints of such translation, fails to explain the intricacies and implied meanings of (...)
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  11. Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Dharma: Its Early History in Law, Religion, and Narrative by Alf Hiltebeitel. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (3):293.
    This book aims to give a better understanding of dharma through an extraordinarily exhaustive account of both the word and the concept through an incisive analysis of Vedic, Buddhist, Puranic, Smriti, and bhakti texts, and even some works of literature.
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  12. Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Sarasvati—Attaining Self-Dominion 4. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (6):326-30.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  13. Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Sarasvati—Attaining Self-Dominion 6. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (9):474-6.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  14. Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Sarasvati—Attaining Self-Dominion 7. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (10):520-2.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  15. Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Sarasvati—Attaining Self-Dominion 8. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (11):568-71.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  16. Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Sarasvati—Attaining Self-Dominion 5. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (7):377-9.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Saraswvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  17. Swami Narasimhananda (2011). Book Review Towards the Goal by Mrs Vandana Sarathy and Dr Rajeev Ramakrishna. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 116 (1):228.
    This book is the history of the beginning of the Vedanta movement in Australia leading to the founding of the Vedanta Society in Sydney. The book brings out the undying spirit of the members of the Vedanta group in Australia and their unremitting efforts at spearheading the movement.
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  18. Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Social Philosophy of Swami Vivekananda by Amulya Ranjan Mohapatra. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (11):647.
    This book tries to collate the different ideas of socialistic thought contained in the vast corpus of Swami Vivekananda's writings and speeches. His humanism led to numerous social activities with the idea that God is present in human beings. He said that education was the solution to all social problems.
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  19. Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Srimad Bhagavata: Condensed in the Poet's Own Words by Pandit A M Srinivasachariar. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (6):406.
    Book review of 'Srimad Bhagavata—Condensed in the Poet's Words' by A M Srinivasachariar. In this book, the Sanskrit Bhagavata verses have been condensed without using any words other those of the original. This has been translated into English by V Raghavan. This book enables one to have an idea of the main content of the lengthier original text.
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  20. Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Jivanmukti Viveka of Vidyaranya by Swami Harshananda. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (9):551.
    This book is a new translation of Jivanmukti Viveka by Vidyaranya by Swami Harshananda, Ramakrishna Math, Bangalore. This translation is lucid and helps one to understand clearly the various subtle nuances of the original Sanskrit text. The original translation was into Kannada, which has been translated into English by H Ramachandra Swamy.
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  21. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as belonging (...)
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  22. Varanasi Ramabraham (2014). MECHANICS OF MIND: AN INFRASONIC WAVE MODEL OF HUMAN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND COMMUNICATION. In Twentieth National Symposium on Ultrasonics (NSU-XX), Department of Physics, Ravenshaw University, cuttack and Ultrasonics Society of India, 24th-25th January, 2014.
    Ideas about human consciousness and mental functions will be analyzed and developed using cognitive science information available in the Upanishads, Brahmajnaana, Advaita and Dvaita schools of thought. -/- The analysis and development so done will be used to theorize and give scheme of human language acquisition and communication process clubbing with Sabdabrahma Siddhanta/Sphota Vaada which put forward infrasonic wave oscillator issuing pulses in infrasonic range and are reflected as brain waves. -/- Thus a brain-wave modulation/demodulation model of human language acquisition (...)
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  23. Varanasi Ramabrahmam (2013). BEING AND BECOMING OF THE MIND: AN UPANISHADIC INSIGHT OF HUMAN CONSCIOUSNSESS AND MENTAL FUNCTIONS. In In Proceedings of the International Conference o “Is Science able to explain the Scientist? (Science abd Scientist-2013) being held at Synergy Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India, on December 08, 2013. Covers Theme 1 : Science of Spiritual.
    Human consciousness, as dealt with in the Upanishads, modeled as a mechanical oscillator of infrasonic frequency (the Atman/Brahman), the result of breathing process, is further advanced to get an insight of functions of mind. An analytical approach is followed in parallel to and separette from quantum mechanical, quantum field and other theoretical propositions, approaches and presentations. Pure consciousness, unoccupied awareness and occupied awareness are identified, defined, classified and discussed together with fresh insight about time-space and time. A reversible transformation (vivartanam) (...)
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  24. Varanasi Ramabrahmam (2004). A Modern Scientific Awareness of Upanishadic Wisdom: Implications to Physiological Psychology and Artificial Intelligence. In In the Proceedings of World Congress on Vedic Sciences, 09-13 August 2004, Bangalore. 562-568.
    Upanishads are traditionally commented upon as texts of theology and religion. But the contents of the Upanishads can also be viewed and commented from modern science point of view. Elements of modern science present in the Upanishads and Advaita Siddhanta will be listed. -/- The nature of maya will be discussed with modern scientific awareness. This awareness will be further used in understanding human mental processes and the ways to model them contributing to the natural language comprehension field of artificial (...)
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  25. Małgorzata Ruchel (2003). Ramakriszna. Filozof - mistyk - święty. Nomos.
    Na osobę i dokonania Ramakriszny można spojrzeć z różnych punktów widzenia (…). Indyjski mędrzec jest zarówno autorytetem religijnym, które określa co dobre, a co złe, i wskazuje swoim uczniom drogę do wyzwolenia, jak i filozofem, szukającym prawdziwej natury świata i zgłębiającym tajniki procesu poznania. Jest wiernym wyznawcą, składającym swe życie w ofierze Bóstwu, i zarazem dociekliwym naukowcem, badającym świat zewnętrzny oraz własne wnętrze. W myśli indyjskiej rozwiązania ontologiczne są nierozerwalnie związana z aksjologią i nakazami praktycznymi. Trudno powiedzieć, co jest filozofią, (...)
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  26. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2016). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The 150th Birth Anniversary of Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902) will be celebrated all over the world during this year. The year long world-wide celebration of 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda was formally inaugurated by the President of India at Swamiji's Ancestral House on 18th January, 2013. His short speech was very inspiring, he made a significant remark after quoting the great historian A.L.Basham , “Swami Vivekananda was very relevant during his times, is more relevant now and will remain relevant as (...)
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  27. Desh Raj Sirswal (2011). Moral Philosophy of Mahrishi Valmiki. Darshan Jyoti 1 (01):35-39.
    In this paper moral philosophy of Mahrishi Valmiki discussed on the basis of his ideas in the Ramayana.
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  28. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2011). Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Recent years have seen the beginning of a radical reassessment of the philosophical literature of ancient and classical India. The analytical techniques of contemporary philosophy are being deployed towards a fresh and original interpretation of the texts. This rational rather than mystical approach towards Indian philosophical theories has resulted in a need to work which explains afresh its central methods, courses and devices. It is with this spirit of thought and background that I want to publish a book to discuss (...)
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