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  1. Micah Allen & Gary Williams (2011). Consciousness, Plasticity, and Connectomics: The Role of Intersubjectivity in Human Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2 (20).
    Consciousness is typically construed as being explainable purely in terms of either private, raw feels or higher-order, reflective representations. In contrast to this false dichotomy, we propose a new view of consciousness as an interactive, plastic phenomenon open to sociocultural influence. We take up our account of consciousness from the observation of radical cortical neuroplasticity in human development. Accordingly, we draw upon recent research on macroscopic neural networks, including the “default mode”, to illustrate cases in which an individual’s particular “connectome” (...)
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  2. Bernard J. Baars, Why It Must Be Consciousness - for Real!
    1.1 Bilateral damage to the thalamus abolishes waking consciousness. The critical site of this damage is believed to be a relatively small cluster of neurons, about the size of a pencil eraser on either side of the brain's midline, called the Intra-Laminar Nuclei (ILN) because they are located inside the white layers (laminae) that divide the two thalami into their major groupings of nuclei. The fact that bilateral damage to the ILNs abolishes consciousness is very unusual. There is no other (...)
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  3. Bernard J. Baars & J. B. Newman (1994). A Neurobiological Interpretation of the Global Workspace Theory of Consciousness. In Antti Revonsuo & Matti Kamppinen (eds.), Consciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive Neuroscience. Lawrence Erlbaum.
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  4. Bernard J. Baars, J. B. Newman & John G. Taylor (1998). Neuronal Mechanisms of Consciousness: A Relational Global Workspace Approach. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 269-278.
    This paper explores a remarkable convergence of ideas and evidence, previously presented in separate places by its authors. That convergence has now become so persuasive that we believe we are working within substantially the same broad framework. Taylor's mathematical papers on neuronal systems involved in consciousness dovetail well with work by Newman and Baars on the thalamocortical system, suggesting a brain mechanism much like the global workspace architecture developed by Baars (see references below). This architecture is relational, in the sense (...)
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  5. C. BeCchio, M. Adenzato & B. Bara (2006). How the Brain Understands Intention: Different Neural Circuits Identify the Componential Features of Motor and Prior Intentions. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):64-74.
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  6. Samuel Bellini-Leite & Alfredo Pereira (2013). Is Global Workspace a Cartesian Theater? How the Neuro-Astroglial Interaction Model Solves Conceptual Issues. Journal of Cognitive Science 14 (4):335-360.
    The Global Workspace Theory (GWT) proposed by Bernard Baars (1988) along with Daniel Dennett’s (1991) Multiple Drafts Model (MDM) of consciousness are renowned cognitive theories of consciousness bearing similarities and differences. Although Dennett displays sympathy for GWT, his own MDM does not seem to be fully compatible with it. This work discusses this compatibility, by asking if GWT suffers from Daniel Dennett’s criticism of what he calls a “Cartesian Theater”. We identified in Dennett 10 requirements for avoiding the Cartesian Theater. (...)
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  7. Ned Block (forthcoming). Consciousness, Big Science and Conceptual Clarity. In Gary Marcus & Jeremy Freeman (eds.), in The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World’s Leading Neuroscientists. Princeton University Press.
  8. Ned Block (2011). Perceptual Consciousness Overflows Cognitive Access. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):567-575.
    One of the most important issues concerning the foundations ofconscious perception centerson thequestion of whether perceptual consciousness is rich or sparse. The overflow argument uses a form of ‘iconic memory’ toarguethatperceptual consciousnessisricher (i.e.,has a higher capacity) than cognitive access: when observing a complex scene we are conscious of more than we can report or think about. Recently, the overflow argumenthas been challenged both empirically and conceptually. This paper reviews the controversy, arguing that proponents of sparse perception are committed to the (...)
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  9. Joseph E. Bogen (2007). The Thalamic Intralaminar Nuclei and the Property of Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.
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  10. Joseph E. Bogen (1998). Locating the Subjectivity Pump: The Thalamic Intralaminar Nuclei. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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  11. Joseph E. Bogen (1997). Some Neurophysiologic Aspects of Consciousness. Seminars in Neurology 17:95-103.
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  12. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part I: An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4:52-62.
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  13. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part II: Constraining the Semantic Problem. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):137-58.
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  14. J. Boitano (1996). Edelmans's Biological Theory of Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  15. F. Bremer (1966). Neurophysiological Correlates of Mental Unity. In John C. Eccles (ed.), Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer. 283--297.
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  16. Bruce Bridgeman (1998). Cortical Models and the Neurological Gap. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (2):157-158.
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  17. Richard Brockman (2001). Toward a Neurobiology of the Unconscious. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry 29 (4):601-615.
  18. Richard Brown (2012). The Brain and its States. In Shimon Edelman, Tomer Fekete & Neta Zach (eds.), Being in Time: Dynamical Models of Phenomenal Experience. John Benjamins. 88--211.
    In recent times we have seen an explosion in the amount of attention paid to the conscious brain from scientists and philosophers alike. One message that has emerged loud and clear from scientific work is that the brain is a dynamical system whose operations unfold in time. Any theory of consciousness that is going to be physically realistic must take account of the intrinsic nature of neurons and brain activity. At the same time a long discussion on consciousness among philosophers (...)
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  19. P. A. Buser & A. Rougeul-Buser (1978). Cerebral Correlates of Conscious Experience. Elsevier.
  20. William Clancey (1993). The Biology of Consciousness: Comparative Review of Rosenfield and Edelman. Artificial Intelligence 60:313-356.
  21. Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.) (1997). Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  22. Diego J. Cosmelli, Jean-Philippe Lachaux & Evan Thompson (2007). Neurodynamical Approaches to Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge. 731--774.
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  23. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.) (1989). Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press.
  24. L. Andrew Coward (2005). A System Architecture Approach to the Brain: From Neurons to Consciousness. Nova Biomedical Books.
    This book is the integrated presentation of a large body of work on understanding the operation of biological brains as systems.
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  25. Francis Crick (1984). Functions of the Thalamic Reticular Complex: The Searchlight Hypothesis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 81:4586-93.
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  26. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2007). A Neurobiological Framework for Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 567--579.
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  27. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2003). What Are the Neural Correlates of Consciousness? In L. van Hemmen & Terrence J. Sejnowski (eds.), Problems in Systems Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
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  28. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. 3-11.
  29. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (1998). Consciousness and Neuroscience. Cerebral Cortex.
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  30. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (1990). Toward a Neurobiological Theory of Consciousness. Seminars in the Neurosciences 2:263-275.
  31. Antonio R. Damasio (2000). A Neurobiology for Consciousness. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  32. Antonio R. Damasio (1999). The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness. Harcourt Brace and Co.
  33. Balaram Das, A Framework for Conscious Information Processing.
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  34. Stanislas Dehaene & Jean-Pierre Changeux (2004). Neural Mechanisms for Access to Consciousness. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 1145-1157.
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  35. Stanislas Dehaene, Michel Kerszberg & Jean-Pierre Changeux (2001). A Neuronal Model of a Global Workspace in Effortful Cognitive Tasks. Pnas 95 (24):14529-14534.
  36. Stanislas Dehaene & Lionel Naccache (2001). Towards a Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: Basic Evidence and a Workspace Framework. Cognition 79 (1):1-37.
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  37. J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.) (1954). Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  38. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Damasio, Descartes' Error. [REVIEW]
    The legacy of René Descartes' notorious dualism of mind and body extends far beyond academia into everyday thinking: "These athletes are prepared both mentally and physically," and "There's nothing wrong with your body--it's all in your mind." Even among those of us who have battled Descartes' vision, there has been a powerful tendency to treat the mind (that is to say, the brain) as the body's boss, the pilot of the ship. Falling in with this standard way of thinking, we (...)
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  39. John C. Eccles (ed.) (1966). Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer.
  40. Gerald M. Edelman (2001). Consciousness: The Remembered Present. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:111-122.
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  41. Gerald M. Edelman (1992). Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind. Penguin.
  42. Gerald M. Edelman (1989). The Remembered Present: A Biological Theory of Consciousness. Basic Books.
    Having laid the groundwork in his critically acclaimed books Neural Darwinism (Basic Books, 1987) and Topobiology (Basic Books, 1988), Nobel laureate Gerald M. Edelman now proposes a comprehensive theory of consciousness in The Remembered ...
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  43. Gerald M. Edelman & Giulio Srinivasan Tononi (2000). Reentry and the Dynamic Core: Neural Correlates of Conscious Experience. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  44. Shimon Edelman, Tomer Fekete & Neta Zach (eds.) (2012). Being in Time: Dynamical Models of Phenomenal Experience. John Benjamins Pub. Co..
    The chapters comprising this book represent a collective attempt on the part of their authors to redress this aberration.
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  45. Ralph D. Ellis (2001). A Theoretical Model of the Role of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Attention and Consciousness. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):300-309.
  46. Ralph D. Ellis (2000). Efferent Brain Processes and the Enactive Approach to Consciousness. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):40-50.
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  47. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.
  48. Tomer Fekete (2010). Representational Systems. Minds and Machines 20 (1):69-101.
    The concept of representation has been a key element in the scientific study of mental processes, ever since such studies commenced. However, usage of the term has been all but too liberal—if one were to adhere to common use it remains unclear if there are examples of physical systems which cannot be construed in terms of representation. The problem is considered afresh, taking as the starting point the notion of activity spaces—spaces of spatiotemporal events produced by dynamical systems. It is (...)
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  49. Tomer Fekete & Shimon Edelman (2012). The (Lack of) Mental Life of Some Machines. In Shimon Edelman, Tomer Fekete & Neta Zach (eds.), Being in Time: Dynamical Models of Phenomenal Experience. John Benjamins.. 88--95.
    The proponents of machine consciousness predicate the mental life of a machine, if any, exclusively on its formal, organizational structure, rather than on its physical composition. Given that matter is organized on a range of levels in time and space, this generic stance must be further constrained by a principled choice of levels on which the posited structure is supposed to reside. Indeed, not only must the formal structure fit well the physical system that realizes it, but it must do (...)
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  50. Tomer Fekete & Shimon Edelman (2011). Towards a Computational Theory of Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):807-827.
    A standing challenge for the science of mind is to account for the datum that every mind faces in the most immediate – that is, unmediated – fashion: its phenomenal experience. The complementary tasks of explaining what it means for a system to give rise to experience and what constitutes the content of experience (qualia) in computational terms are particularly challenging, given the multiple realizability of computation. In this paper, we identify a set of conditions that a computational theory must (...)
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