Results for 'Biotechnology'

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  1. Biotechnology: An Agricultural Revolution.Public Acceptability of Agricultural Biotechnology - 1995 - In T. B. Mepham, G. A. Tucker & J. Wiseman (eds.), Issues in Agricultural Bioethics. Nottingham University Press.
     
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  2.  58
    Acquisition of Autonomy in Biotechnology and Artificial Intelligence.Philippe Gagnon, Mathieu Guillermin, Olivier Georgeon, Juan R. Vidal & Béatrice de Montera - 2020 - In S. Hashimoto N. Callaos (ed.), Proceedings of the 11th International Multi-Conference on Complexity, Informatics and Cybernetics: IMCIC 2020, Volume II. Winter Garden: International Institute for Informatics and Systemics. pp. 168-172.
    This presentation discusses a notion encountered across disciplines, and in different facets of human activity: autonomous activity. We engage it in an interdisciplinary way. We start by considering the reactions and behaviors of biological entities to biotechnological intervention. An attempt is made to characterize the degree of freedom of embryos & clones, which show openness to different outcomes when the epigenetic developmental landscape is factored in. We then consider the claim made in programming and artificial intelligence that automata could show (...)
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  3.  47
    Reconstruction of the Ethical Debate on Naturalness in Discussions About Plant-Biotechnology.P. F. Van Haperen, B. Gremmen & J. Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):797-812.
    Abstract This paper argues that in modern (agro)biotechnology, (un)naturalness as an argument contributed to a stalemate in public debate about innovative technologies. Naturalness in this is often placed opposite to human disruption. It also often serves as a label that shapes moral acceptance or rejection of agricultural innovative technologies. The cause of this lies in the use of nature as a closed, static reference to naturalness, while in fact “nature” is an open and dynamic concept with many different meanings. (...)
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  4.  20
    Reconstruction of the Ethical Debate on Naturalness in Discussions About Plant-Biotechnology.P. F. Haperen, B. Gremmen & J. Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):797-812.
    This paper argues that in modern (agro)biotechnology, (un)naturalness as an argument contributed to a stalemate in public debate about innovative technologies. Naturalness in this is often placed opposite to human disruption. It also often serves as a label that shapes moral acceptance or rejection of agricultural innovative technologies. The cause of this lies in the use of nature as a closed, static reference to naturalness, while in fact “nature” is an open and dynamic concept with many different meanings. We (...)
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  5.  45
    Biotechnology and Naturalness in the Genomics Era: Plotting a Timetable for the Biotechnology Debate. [REVIEW]Hub Zwart - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):505-529.
    Debates on the role of biotechnology in food production are beset with notorious ambiguities. This already applies to the term “biotechnology” itself. Does it refer to the use and modification of living organisms in general, or rather to a specific set of technologies developed quite recently in the form of bioengineering and genetic modification? No less ambiguous are discussions concerning the question to what extent biotechnology must be regarded as “unnatural.” In this article it will be argued (...)
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  6.  22
    An Aretaic Objection to Agricultural Biotechnology.Ronald Sandler - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):301-317.
    Considerations of virtue and character appear from time to time in the agricultural biotechnology literature. Critics of the technologies often suggest that they are contrary to some virtue (usually humility) or do not fit with the image of ourselves and the human place in the world that we ought to embrace. In this article, I consider the aretaic or virtue-based objection that to engage in agricultural biotechnology is to exhibit arrogance, hubris, and disaffection. In section one, I discuss (...)
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  7.  18
    An Error Theory of Biotechnology and the Ethics of Chemical Breakups: It Is the Reasons, Not the Pharmaceuticals, That Are Important in Defending Against Perilous Love.Gavin Enck - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):32-34.
    In this commentary, I offer an account of an error theory of biotechnology and apply it to Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk,Anders Sandberg, and Julian Savulescu’s (2013)ethical framework for chemical reakups.
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  8.  64
    The Technological Fix Criticisms and the Agricultural Biotechnology Debate.Dane Scott - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):207-226.
    A common tactic in public debates over science and technology is to dismissively label innovations as mere technological fixes. This tactic can be readily observed in the long debate over agricultural biotechnology. While these criticisms are often superficial rhetorical tactics, they point to deeper philosophical disagreements about the role of technology in society. Examining the technological fix criticism can clarify these underlying philosophical disagreements and the debate over biotechnology. The first part of this essay discusses the origins of (...)
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  9.  26
    Renewable Resources and the Idea of Nature – What has Biotechnology Got to Do with It?Nicole C. Karafyllis - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (1):3-28.
    The notion that the idea of nature isnot quite the unbiased rule to designsustainable futures is obvious. But,nevertheless, questions about nature, how itfunctions and what it might aim at, is leadingthe controversial debates about bothsustainability and biotechnology. These tworesearch areas hardly have the same theorybackground. Whereas in the first concept, theidea of eternal cyclical processes is basic,the latter focuses on optimization. However,both concepts can work together, but only undera narrow range of public acceptance in Europe.The plausibility of arguments for (...)
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  10.  37
    Can Tacit Knowledge Fit Into a Computer Model of Scientific Cognitive Processes? The Case of Biotechnology.Andrea Pozzali - 2007 - Mind and Society 6 (2):211-224.
    This paper tries to express a critical point of view on the computational turn in philosophy by looking at a specific field of study: philosophy of science. The paper starts by briefly discussing the main contributions that information and communication technologies have given to the rising of computational philosophy of science, and in particular to the cognitive modelling approach. The main question then arises, concerning how computational models can cope with the presence of tacit knowledge in science. Would it be (...)
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  11.  27
    How Biotechnology Regulation Sets a Risk/Ethics Boundary.Les Levidow & Susan Carr - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):29-43.
    In public debate over agricultural biotechnology, at issue hasbeen its self-proclaimed aim of further industrializingagriculture. Using languages of ’risk‘, critics and proponentshave engaged in an implicit ethics debate on the direction oftechnoscientific development. Critics have challenged thebiotechnological R&D agenda for attributing socio-agronomicproblems to genetic deficiencies, while perpetuating the hazardsof intensive monoculture. They diagnosed ominous links betweentechnological dependency and tangible harm from biotechnologyproducts.In response to scientific and public concerns, theEuropean Community enacted precautionary legislation for theintentional release of genetically modified organisms. (...)
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  12.  20
    Seeds of Discontent: Expert Opinion, Mass Media Messages, and the Public Image of Agricultural Biotechnology[REVIEW]Susanna Hornig Priest & Allen W. Gillespie - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):529-539.
    Survey data are presented on opinions about agricultural biotechnology and its applications held by agricultural science faculty at highly ranked programs in the United States with and without personal involvement in biotechnology-oriented research. Respondents believed biotech holds much promise, but policy positions vary. These results underscore the relationship between opinion and stakeholder interests in this research, even among scientific experts. Media accounts are often seen as causes, rather than artifacts, of the existence of public controversy; European and now (...)
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  13.  50
    A Social Contract for Biotechnology: Shared Visions for Risky Technologies?Donald M. Bruce - 2002 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):279-289.
    Future technological developmentsconcerning food, agriculture, and theenvironment face a gulf of social legitimationfrom a skeptical public and media, in the wakeof the crises of BSE, GM food, and foot andmouth disease in the UK (House of Lords, 2000). Keyethical issues were ignored by the bioindustry,regulators, and the Government, leaving alegacy of distrust. The paper examinesagricultural biotechnology in terms of a socialcontract, whose conditions would have to be fulfilled togain acceptance of novel applications. Variouscurrent and future GM applications areevaluated against (...)
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  14.  18
    Science Policy and Moral Purity: The Case of Animal Biotechnology.Paul B. Thompson - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):11-27.
    Public controversy over animalbiotechnology is analyzed as a case that illustratestwo broad theoretical approaches for linking science,political or ethical theory, and public policy. Moralpurification proceeds by isolating the social,environmental, animal, and human health impacts ofbiotechnology from each other in terms of discretecategories of moral significance. Each of thesecategories can also be isolated from the sense inwhich biotechnology raises religious or metaphysicalissues. Moral purification yields a comprehensive andsystematic account of normative issues raised bycontroversial science. Hybridization proceeds bytaking concern for all (...)
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  15.  37
    Labeling Products of Biotechnology: Towards Communication and Consent.Debra Jackson - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (3):319-330.
    Both consumers and producers of biotechnology products have insisted that communication between the two be improved. The former demand more democratic participation in the risk assessment process of biotechnology products. The latter seek to correct misinformation regarding alleged risks from these products. One way to resolve these concerns, I argue, is through the use of biotechnology labels. Such labeling fosters consumer autonomy and moves toward more participatory decisionmaking, in addition to ensuring that informed consent from consumers is (...)
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  16.  21
    The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW]Nicolas Rasmussen - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop it as a growth-boosting (...)
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  17. Vexing Nature? On the Ethical Case Against Agricultural Biotechnology.L. Comstock Gary - 2000 - Boston: Kluwer.
    Agricultural biotechnology refers to a diverse set of industrial techniques used to produce genetically modified foods. Genetically modified (GM) foods are foods manipulated at the molecular level to enhance their value to farmers and consumers. This book is a collection of essays on the ethical dimensions of ag biotech. The essays were written over a dozen years, beginning in 1988. When I began to reflect on the subject, ag biotech was an exotic, untested, technology. Today, in the first year (...)
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  18.  45
    Are Life Patents Ethical? Conflict Between Catholic Social Teaching and Agricultural Biotechnology's Patent Regime.Keith Douglass Warner - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):301-319.
    Patents for genetic material in theindustrialized North have expandedsignificantly over the past twenty years,playing a crucial role in the currentconfiguration of the agricultural biotechnologyindustries, and raising significant ethicalissues. Patents have been claimed for genes,gene sequences, engineered crop species, andthe technical processes to engineer them. Mostcritics have addressed the human and ecosystemhealth implications of genetically engineeredcrops, but these broad patents raise economicissues as well. The Catholic social teachingtradition offers guidelines for critiquing theeconomic implications of this new patentregime. The Catholic principle of (...)
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  19.  11
    Morally Contentious Technology-Field Intersections: The Case of Biotechnology in the United States. [REVIEW]Benjamin M. Cole & Preeta M. Banerjee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):555-574.
    Technologies can be not only contentious—overthrowing existing ways of doing things—but also morally contentious—forcing deep reflection on personal values and societal norms. This article investigates that what may impede the acceptance of a technology and/or the development of the field that supports or exploits it, the lines between which often become blurred in the face of morally contentious content. Using a unique dataset with historically important timing—the United States Biotechnology Study fielded just 9 months after the public announcement of (...)
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  20.  32
    Agricultural Biotechnology and the Future Benefits Argument.Jeffrey Burkhardt - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):135-145.
    In the face of criticisms about the current generationof agricultural biotechnology products, some proponents ofagricultural biotechnology offer a ``future benefitsargument''''(FBA), which is a utilitarian ethical argument thatattempts to justify continued R&D. This paper analyzes severallogical implications of the FBA. Among these are that acceptanceof the FBA implies (1) acceptance of a precautionary approach torisk, (2) the need for a more proportional and equitabledistribution of the benefits of agricultural biotechnology, andmost important, (3) the need to reorient and restructurebiotechnology (...)
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  21.  54
    Including Public Perspectives in Industrial Biotechnology and the Biobased Economy.Lino Paula & Frans Birrer - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):253-267.
    Industrial (“white”) biotechnology promises to contribute to a more sustainable future. Compared to current production processes, cases have been identified where industrial biotechnology can decrease the amount of energy and raw materials used to make products and also reduce the amount of emissions and waste produced during production. However, switching from products based on chemical production processes and fossil fuels towards “biobased” products is at present not necessarily economically viable. This is especially true for bulk products, for example (...)
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  22.  63
    Biotechnology is Not Compatible with Sustainable Agriculture.Martha L. Crouch - 1995 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):98-111.
    Biotechnology increases commercialization of food production, which competes with food for home use. Most people in the world grow their own food, and are more secure without the mediation of the market. To the extent that biotechnology enhances market competitiveness, world food security will decrease. This instability will result in a greater gap between rich and poor, increasing poverty of women and children, less ability and incentive to protect the environment, and greater need for militarization to maintain order. (...)
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  23.  38
    The Debate Over Food Biotechnology in the United States: Is a Societal Consensus Achievable?Edward Groth - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):327-346.
    Unless the public comes to agree that the benefits of food biotechnology are desirable and the associated risks are acceptable, our society may fail to realize much of the potential benefits. Three historical cases of major technological innovations whose benefits and risks were the subject of heated public controversy are examined, in search of lessons that may suggest a path toward consensus in the biotechnology debate. In each of the cases—water fluoridation, nuclear power and pesticides—proponents of the technology (...)
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  24.  62
    She Came, She Saw, She Sowed: Re-Negotiating Gender-Responsive Priorities for Effective Development of Agricultural Biotechnology in Sub-Saharan Africa. [REVIEW]Obidimma C. Ezezika, Jennifer Deadman & Abdallah S. Daar - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):461-471.
    In this paper, we argue for the importance of incorporating a gendered perspective for the effective development of sustainable agricultural biotechnology systems in sub-Saharan Africa. Priority setting for agricultural policy and project development requires attention to gender issues specific to the demands of agricultural biotechnology. This is essential for successfully addressing food security and poverty reduction in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). There has been a great deal of debate and literature on the implications of gender in agricultural development and (...)
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  25.  36
    Biotechnology is Compatible with Sustainable Agriculture.Donald N. Duvick - 1995 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):112-125.
    Biotechnology can provide appropriate new tools for use in solution of specific problems in sustainable agriculture. Its usefulness will depend in large part on the degree to which sustainable agriculturists understand the utility of biotechnology and apply it toward ends they deem important. Biotechnology can give little assistance to sustainable agriculture in the short term. It can be more useful in the medium term, and it could be highly useful in the long term as an integral part (...)
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  26.  38
    Crop Biotechnology for the Environment?Sven Ove Hansson & Karin Joelsson - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (4):759-770.
    In public debates, agricultural biotechnology is almost invariably discussed as a potential threat to the environment and to human health. Without downplaying the risks associated with this technology we emphasize that if properly regulated, it can be a forceful tool to solve environmental problems and promote human health. Agricultural biotechnology can reduce environmental problems in at least three ways: it can diminish the need for environmentally damaging agricultural practices such as pesticides, fertilizers, tillage, and irrigation. It can reduce (...)
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  27.  22
    Biotechnology as End Game: Ontological and Ethical Collapse in the “Biotech Century”.Zipporah Weisberg - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (1):39-54.
    I argue in this paper that animal biotechnology constitutes a dangerous ontological collapse between animals and the technical-economic apparatus. By ontological collapse, I mean the elimination of fundamental ontological tensions between embodied subjects and the principles of scientific, technological, and economic rationalization. Biotechnology imposes this collapse in various ways: by genetically “reprogramming” animals to serve as uniform commodities, by abstracting them into data and code, and, in some cases, by literally manipulating their movements with computer technologies. These and (...)
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  28.  27
    Biotechnology, Ethics and Education.Peter John Fitzsimons - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (1):1-11.
    Fundamental differences between current and past knowledge in the field of biotechnology mean that we now have at our disposal the means to irreversibly change what is meant by ‘human nature’. This paper explores some of the ethical issues that accompany the attempt to increase scientific control over the human genetic code in what amounts to a diminishing of difference and the reduction of human life to scientific explanations at the expense of spiritual, cultural and communal considerations. Within such (...)
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  29.  21
    Environmental Biotechnology Research: Challenges and Opportunities in Latin America.Janeth Sanabria - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):681-694.
    Latin American countries have an extensive biological diversity and a tropical or subtropical climate. This condition has advantages for development and for the implementation of biotechnological solutions for environmental problems. Environmental biotechnology could be used to enhance biodegradation, waste recovery, and also for the development of biotechnology-based products to diagnose and reduce environmental impacts such as biosensors, biopesticides, biofertilizers and biofuels. To generate new environmental biotechnological products, Latin American countries must not only overcome the known limitations associated with (...)
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  30.  7
    Complex Mediascapes, Complex Realities: Critically Engaging with Biotechnology Debates in Ghana.Joeva Rock - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):55-64.
    ABSTRACTThe recent increase in research and commercialization of genetically modified crops in Africa has resulted in considerable and understandable interest from farmers, scholars, and practitioners. However, messy situations are often hard to critically engage in from afar, and the recent article published by Braimah et al. [. Debated agronomy: Public discourse and the future of biotechnology policy in Ghana. Global Bioethics. doi:10.1080/11287462.2016.1261604] presents certain claims that further obfuscate – rather than clarify – an already complex landscape. In this commentary (...)
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  31.  19
    Special Communication: Biotechnology From the Perspective of Iranian Law.Hamid Reza Salehi - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):125-130.
    IntroductionNowadays, biotechnology has a significant influence on different aspects of human life. The applications of biotechnology are so broad, and the advantages so compelling, that virtually every industry is using this technology. Developments are under way in areas as diverse as pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, textiles, aquaculture, forestry, chemicals, household products, environmental cleanup, food processing, and forensics, to name a few. Biotechnology is enabling these industries to make new or better products, often with greater speed, efficiency, and flexibility. (...) is any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof to make or modify products or processes for specific use. It applies the knowledge of biology to enhance and improve the environment, health, and food supply. Using biotechnology, scientists work to develop environment-friendly alternatives to fossil fuels and plastics; new medicines, vaccines, and. (shrink)
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  32.  29
    Impact of Education on the Attitudes of College Students Toward Biotechnology.L. G. Sterling, C. K. Halbrendt & S. L. Kitto - 1993 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):75-88.
    An interdisciplinary course was designed as an introduction to the applications of, and the socio-economic issues associated with, biotechnology. College students enrolled in the course were surveyed prior to the first formal lecture, and again upon completion of the course. Assessment was made of the impact of the educational materials on the attitudes and perceptions of the students toward the applications of biotechnology to agriculture. Data were collected for the first three semesters in which the course was offered. (...)
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  33.  14
    The Ethical and Political Evaluation of Biotechnology Strategies.Juha Räikkä - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):273-280.
    In this paper I will briefly discuss the role and function of the ethical advisory committees and other ethics bodies that are supposed to take care of the ethical dimension of the biotechnology strategies. The expert ethical advice has created colourful discussion in many contexts, but here I aim to analyze the role and relevance of ethical expertise in the context of national and regional biotechnology strategies. I will argue that it may be quite unproblematic that the work (...)
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  34.  10
    L'arte della vita: biotecnologie e bioetica [Bioart, biotechnology and bioethics].Rosangela Barcaro - 2014 - Aisthema. International Journal, ISSN 2284-3515 1 (2):23-45.
    Bioart is an artistic experience that relates art, science and biotechnology by examining the concepts of life, evolution and nature from a new point of view. The revolutionary idea at the basis of this experience is the use of living organic matter as an expressive medium, handled with techniques which are made possible by the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs. Bioart aims at allowing a broader public the understanding and discussion of the problems related to activities that shape the (...)
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  35.  16
    Genetic Biotechnology and Evolutionary Theory: Some Unsolicited Advice to Rhetors.David Depew - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):15-28.
    In his book The Biotech Century Jeremy Rifkin makes arguments about the dangers of market-driven genetic biotechnology in medical and agricultural contexts. Believing that Darwinism is too compromised by a competitive ethic to resist capitalist depredations of the genetic commons, and perhaps hoping to pick up anti-Darwinian allies, he turns for support to unorthodox non-Darwinian views of evolution. The Darwinian tradition, more closely examined, contains resources that might better serve his argument. The robust tradition associated with Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ernst (...)
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  36.  9
    Biotechnology and Faith. Relativism in the Postmodern Moral. A Christian-Orthodox Approach.Stefan Iloaie - 2009 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):38-52.
    The modern man lives in a more and more technologized world. This fact is obvious at every step of our life and, in the last decades, it went beyond any expectation. By using science and technology to procreate, prolong and sustain life, the man risks being dehumanized. Bioethics raises many questions that are waiting for an answer, and this answer is given by each person, according to his own values. One of the major challenges in the field of bioethics is (...)
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  37. What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?Lawrence Busch & John R. Lloyd - 2008 - In Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.), What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos. Elsevier/Academic Press.
     
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  38.  46
    Animals as Biotechnology: Ethics, Sustainability, and Critical Animal Studies.Richard Twine - 2010 - Earthscan.
    This book concludes by considering whether growing counter calls to reduce our consumption of meat/dairy products in the face of climate change threats are in ...
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  39.  19
    Is Dandelion Rubber More Natural? Naturalness, Biotechnology and the Transition Towards a Bio-Based Society.Hub Zwart, Lotte Krabbenborg & Jochem Zwier - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):313-334.
    In the unfolding debate on the prospects, challenges and viability of the imminent transition towards a ‘Bio-Based Society’ or ‘Bio-based Economy’—i.e. the replacement of fossil fuels by biomass as a basic resource for the production of energy, materials and food, ‘big’ concepts tend to play an important role, such as, for instance, ‘sustainability’, ‘global justice’ and ‘naturalness’. The latter concept is, perhaps, the most challenging and intriguing one. In public debates concerning biotechnological interactions with the natural environment, the use of (...)
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  40.  30
    What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos.Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.) - 2008 - Elsevier/Academic Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes kapitelvis.
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  41.  22
    Developing Social Responsibility: Biotechnology and the Case of DuPont in Brazil.Margaret Ann Griesse - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):103-118.
    The development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has caused worldwide debate and has required us to reevaluate theories of social responsibility. This article, first, briefly discusses the progressive stages of social responsibility that scholars have outlined as they examine the history of businesses. Next an overview of the development of the DuPont corporation in the United States is presented, tracing DuPont’s transformation from an explosives and chemicals company into a life-science corporation and demonstrating how outside factors influenced this change. The (...)
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  42. Life, Death, Genes, and Ethics: Biotechnology and Bioethics.M. J. Charlesworth - 1989 - Abc Enterprises for the Australian Broadcasting.
  43. Biotechnology and the Religion-Science Discussion.Ron Cole-Turner - 2006 - In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 929--944.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001713218; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 929-944.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 943-944.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  44.  14
    Infertility, Abortion, and Biotechnology.Samuel K. Wasser - 1990 - Human Nature 1 (1):3-24.
    Patterns of reproductive failure described in humans and other mammals suggest that reproductive failure may in many instances be the result of adaptations evolved to suppress reproduction under temporarily harsh conditions. By suppressing reproduction under such conditions, females are able to conserve their time and energy for reproductive opportunities in which reproduction is most likely to succeed. Such adaptations have been particularly important for female mammals, given (a) the amount of time and energy that reproduction requires, and (b) the degree (...)
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  45.  19
    The Finitude of Nature: Rethinking the Ethics of Biotechnology.Helen A. Fielding - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):327-334.
    In order to open new possibilities for bioethics, I argue that we need to rethink our concept of nature. The established cognitive framework determines in advance how new technologies will become visible. Indeed, in this dualistic approach of metaphysics, nature is posited as limitless, as material endowed with force which causes us to lose the sense of nature as arising out of itself, of having limits, an end. In contrast, drawing upon the example of the gender assignment and construction of (...)
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  46.  60
    Exploiting CRISPR/Cas Systems for Biotechnology.Timothy R. Sampson & David S. Weiss - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (1):34-38.
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  47. Biotechnology, Law, and Bioethics: Comparative Perspectives.Romeo Casabona & Carlos María (eds.) - 1999 - Bruylant.
     
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  48. Superpigs and Wondercorn: The Brave New World of Biotechnology and Where It All May Lead.Michael W. Fox - 1992 - Lyons & Burford.
    Michael W. Fox, the respected Vice President of the Humane Society of the United States, here looks at the biogenetic controversy and draws some troubling conclusions. Biogenetic research is capable of producing new life forms whose effects may alter the intricate balance of Nature in ways no one can foretell. "Superpigs" that grow larger than any pig before, cows that breed on an accelerated cycle, "new" vegetables, tomatoes that won't freeze - such new life forms can now be patented, making (...)
     
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  49.  33
    The Ideal of Nature: Debates About Biotechnology and the Environment.Gregory E. Kaebnick (ed.) - 2011 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    This volume probes whether "nature" and "the natural" are capable of guiding moral deliberations in policy making.
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  50. If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup.Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):3-17.
    ?Love hurts??as the saying goes?and a certain amount of pain and difficulty in intimate relationships is unavoidable. Sometimes it may even be beneficial, since adversity can lead to personal growth, self-discovery, and a range of other components of a life well-lived. But other times, love can be downright dangerous. It may bind a spouse to her domestic abuser, draw an unscrupulous adult toward sexual involvement with a child, put someone under the insidious spell of a cult leader, and even inspire (...)
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