Results for 'scientific revolution'

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  1.  58
    Diagrammatic Reasoning and Modelling in the Imagination: The Secret Weapons of the Scientific Revolution.James Franklin - 2000 - In Guy Freeland & Anthony Corones (eds.), 1543 and All That: Image and Word, Change and Continuity in the Proto-Scientific Revolution. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Just before the Scientific Revolution, there was a "Mathematical Revolution", heavily based on geometrical and machine diagrams. The "faculty of imagination" (now called scientific visualization) was developed to allow 3D understanding of planetary motion, human anatomy and the workings of machines. 1543 saw the publication of the heavily geometrical work of Copernicus and Vesalius, as well as the first Italian translation of Euclid.
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  2. Was the Scientific Revolution Really a Revolution in Science?Gary Hatfield - 1996 - In Jamil Ragep & Sally Ragep (eds.), Tradition, Transmission, Transformation. Brill. pp. 489–525.
    This chapter poses questions about the existence and character of the Scientific Revolution by deriving its initial categories of analysis and its initial understanding of the intellectual scene from the writings of the seventeenth century, and by following the evolution of these initial categories in succeeding centuries. This project fits the theme of cross cultural transmission and appropriation -- a theme of the present volume -- if one takes the notion of a culture broadly, so that, say, seventeenth (...)
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  3. We Are Not Witnesses to a New Scientific Revolution.Gregor Schiemann - 2014 - In A. Nordmann & H. Radder (eds.), Science Transformed? Debating Claims of an Epochal Break. Velbrück. pp. 31-42.
    Do the changes that have taken place in the structures and methods of the production of scientific knowledge and in our understanding of science over the past fifty years justify speaking of an epochal break in the development of science? Gregor Schiemann addresses this issues through the notion of a scientific revolution and claims that at present we are not witnessing a new scientific revolution. Instead, Schiemann argues that after the so-called Scientific Revolution (...)
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  4. When Did the" Copernican" Revolution Become a Scientific Revolution?A. Ule - 2005 - Filozofski Vestnik 26 (1):29 - +.
    We have to distinguish between the scientific revolution which was bound on the work of Copernicus and the cultural-ideological changes that have accompanied and framed this revolution. The "Copernican" revolution was in the beginning a constituent of cultural and ideological changes at the end of Renaissance but it became a scientific revolution only with Galilei and Kepler. This was the first scientific revolution which inagurated the internal dynamics of the scientific development. (...)
     
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  5.  8
    Elliptical Orbits and the Aristotelian Scientific Revolution Comment on Groarke.James Franklin - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):169-179.
    The Scientific Revolution was far from the anti-Aristotelian movement traditionally pictured. Its applied mathematics pursued by new means the Aristotelian ideal of science as knowledge by insight into necessary causes. Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s elliptical planetary orbits from the inverse square law of gravity is a central example.
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  6.  36
    Einstein's Scientific Revolution (1898-1915): interdisciplinary Context.Rinat M. Nugayev (ed.) - 2010 - Logos: Innovative Technologies Center.
    What are the reasons of the second scientific revolution that happened at the beginning of the XX century? Why did the new physics supersede the old one? The author tries to answer the subtle questions with a help of the epistemological model of scientific revolutions that takes into account some recent advances in philosophy, sociology and history of science. According to the model, Einstein’s Revolution took place due to resolution of deep contradictions between the basic classical (...)
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  7. Maxwellian Scientific Revolution: A Case Study in Kantian Epistemology.Rinat M. Nugayev - 2014 - Logos and Episteme 5 (2):183-207.
    It is exhibited that maxwellian electrodynamics grew out of the old pre-maxwellian programmes reconciliation: the electrodynamics of Ampere-Weber, the wave theory of Young-Fresnel and Faraday’s scientific research programme. The programmes’ meeting led to construction of the whole hierarchy of theoretical objects starting from the genuine crossbreeds (the displacement current) and up to usual mongrels. After the displacement current invention the interpenetration of the pre-maxwellian programmes began that marked the beginning of theoretical schemes of optics and electromagnetism real unification. Maxwell’s (...)
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  8. Why Was There No Controversy Over Life in the Scientific Revolution?Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - In Victor Boantza Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Controversies in the Scientific Revolution. John Benjamins.
    Well prior to the invention of the term ‘biology’ in the early 1800s by Lamarck and Treviranus, and also prior to the appearance of terms such as ‘organism’ under the pen of Leibniz in the early 1700s, the question of ‘Life’, that is, the status of living organisms within the broader physico-mechanical universe, agitated different corners of the European intellectual scene. From modern Epicureanism to medical Newtonianism, from Stahlian animism to the discourse on the ‘animal economy’ in vitalist medicine, models (...)
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  9.  3
    David Marshall Miller. Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution. Reviewed By.Alessandro Giostra - 2018 - Philosophy in Review 38 (4):148-150.
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  10.  14
    Reflections on the Scientific Revolution (1543–1687).Owen Gingerich - 2010 - In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 603--617.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Aristotle’s Errors * The Myth of the Flat Earth * The Copernican Transformation * The Tychonian Transition * The “Universe Based on Causes” of Johannes Kepler * Galileo and the Telescope * Newton, the Ultimate Unifier * Note.
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  11.  6
    The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz and the Cultivation of Virtue.Matthew L. Jones - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution presents a triptych showing how three key early modern scientists, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, and Gottfried ...
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  12.  34
    Intermediate Causes and Explanations: The Key to Understanding the Scientific Revolution.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):551-562.
    It is instructive to view the scientific revolution from the point of view of Robert Boyle’s distinction between intermediate and ultimate causes. From this point of view, the scientific revolution involved the identification of intermediate causes and their investigation by way of experiment as opposed to the specification of ultimate causes of the kind involved in the corpuscular matter theories of the mechanical philosophers. The merits of this point of view are explored in this paper by (...)
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  13.  22
    On Decoding and Rewriting Genomes: A Psychoanalytical Reading of a Scientific Revolution[REVIEW]Hub Zwart - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):337-346.
    In various documents the view emerges that contemporary biotechnosciences are currently experiencing a scientific revolution: a massive increase of pace, scale and scope. A significant part of the research endeavours involved in this scientific upheaval is devoted to understanding and, if possible, ameliorating humankind: from our genomes up to our bodies and brains. New developments in contemporary technosciences, such as synthetic biology and other genomics and “post-genomics” fields, tend to blur the distinctions between prevention, therapy and enhancement. (...)
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  14. “Do We Need a Scientific Revolution.Nicholas Maxwell - 2008 - Journal for Biological Physics and Chemistry 8 (3):95-105.
    Do We Need a Scientific Revolution? (Published in the Journal of Biological Physics and Chemistry, vol. 8, no. 3, September 2008) Nicholas Maxwell (Emeritus Reader in Philosophy of Science at University College London) www.nick-maxwell.demon.co.uk Abstract Many see modern science as having serious defects, intellectual, social, moral. Few see this as having anything to do with the philosophy of science. I argue that many diverse ills of modern science are a consequence of the fact that the scientific community (...)
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  15.  73
    Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution.Edward Grant - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and it (...)
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  16. Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution.David Marshall Miller - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The novel understanding of the physical world that characterized the Scientific Revolution depended on a fundamental shift in the way its protagonists understood and described space. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, spatial phenomena were described in relation to a presupposed central point; by its end, space had become a centerless void in which phenomena could only be described by reference to arbitrary orientations. David Marshall Miller examines both the historical and philosophical aspects of this far-reaching development, (...)
     
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  17.  3
    Intermediate Causes and Explanations: The Key to Understanding the Scientific Revolution.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):551-562.
    It is instructive to view the scientific revolution from the point of view of Robert Boyle’s distinction between intermediate and ultimate causes. From this point of view, the scientific revolution involved the identification of intermediate causes and their investigation by way of experiment as opposed to the specification of ultimate causes of the kind involved in the corpuscular matter theories of the mechanical philosophers. The merits of this point of view are explored in this paper by (...)
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  18. The Scientific Revolution Reasserted.Richard S. Westfall - 2000 - In Margaret J. Osler (ed.), Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 41--55.
     
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  19.  37
    Rethinking the Scientific Revolution.Margaret J. Osler (ed.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection reconsiders canonical figures and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during the Scientific Revolution.
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  20.  6
    Structure of the Digital Scientific Revolution.Sławomir Grzegorz Leciejewski - 2018 - Philosophical Problems in Science 64:117-136.
    Nowadays, computers are in common use, both in experimental and theoretical research. It is worth considering if the implementation of a new, universal research tool has significantly changed the science of the end of 20th century. The crucial question which I will try to answer is if computers have revolutionized the scientific research. In order to find the answer, I will describe modern digitally aided science, taking into consideration the research conducted in the greatest elementary physics laboratory. Subsequently, I (...)
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  21.  66
    Animal Generation and the Mechanical Philosophy: Some Light on the Role of Biology in the Scientific Revolution.Andrew J. Pyle - 1987 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (2):225 - 254.
    In a recent paper, Keith Hutchison has advanced the thesis that the Mechanical Philosophy represents a shift towards supernaturalism in our conception of the physical world. This paper concentrates on one of the great problems of seventeenth-century biological theory — animal generation — to illustrate (and modify) Hutchison's thesis, thereby also serving to locate one role of the life sciences in the Scientific Revolution. This choice of focus enables us to draw heavily on Jacques Roger's seminal work on (...)
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  22.  20
    Jewish Theologies of Space in the Scientific Revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and Their Predecessors.Brian P. Copenhaver - 1980 - Annals of Science 37 (5):489-548.
    (1980). Jewish theologies of space in the scientific revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and their predecessors. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 489-548.
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  23. The Canonical Imperative: Rethinking the Scientific Revolution.Margaret J. Osler - 2000 - In Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--24.
     
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  24.  20
    The Scientific Revolution and The Death of Nature.Carolyn Merchant - 2006 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 97:513-533.
    The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution, published in 1980, presented a view of the Scientific Revolution that challenged the hegemony of mechanistic science as a marker of progress. It argued that seventeenth‐century science could be implicated in the ecological crisis, the domination of nature, and the devaluation of women in the production of scientific knowledge. This essay offers a twenty‐five‐year retrospective of the book’s contributions to ecofeminism, environmental history, and reassessments of (...)
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  25.  83
    Shapin's the Scientific Revolution: What Will Philosophers Find? [REVIEW]K. Brad Wray - 1999 - Social Epistemology 13 (3 & 4):331 – 335.
    This is a book review of Steven Shapin's The Scientific Revolution.
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  26.  47
    Introducing New Predicates to Model Scientific Revolution.Charles X. Ling - 1995 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (1):19 – 36.
    Abstract The notion of necessary new terms (predicates) is proposed. It is shown that necessary new predicates in first?order logic must be directly, recursively defined. I present a first?order inductive learning algorithm that introduces new necessary predicates to model scientific revolution in which a new language is adopted. I demonstrate that my learning system can learn a genetic theory with theoretical terms which, after being induced by my system, can be interpreted as either types of genetic properties (dominant (...)
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  27.  32
    The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and the Cultivation of Virtue.Charlie Huenemann - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 321-322.
    It can be fairly said that the Fall of Adam is not much on the minds of scientists nowadays. But apparently it was in the days of the scientific revolution. Jones reads Descartes, Pascal, and Leibniz as all discovering in the new science different implications for our ruined natural state. For these thinkers , the Fall meant losing epistemic privileges and moral attunement. Losing Eden meant losing our place in the universe. And the promise of the new science, (...)
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  28.  9
    What’s Wrong with Talking About the Scientific Revolution? Applying Lessons From History of Science to Applied Fields of Science Studies.Lindy A. Orthia - 2016 - Minerva 54 (3):353-373.
    Since the mid-twentieth century, the ‘Scientific Revolution’ has arguably occupied centre stage in most Westerners’, and many non-Westerners’, conceptions of science history. Yet among history of science specialists that position has been profoundly contested. Most radically, historians Andrew Cunningham and Perry Williams in 1993 proposed to demolish the prevailing ‘big picture’ which posited that the Scientific Revolution marked the origin of modern science. They proposed a new big picture in which science is seen as a distinctly (...)
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  29.  10
    Mechanism and Activity in the Scientific Revolution: The Case of Robert Hooke.Mark E. Ehrlich - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (2):127-151.
    Recent ‘revisionist’ studies of the Scientific Revolution have utilized Robert Hooke as an example of a mechanical philosopher who incorporated active principles in his world system. This paper carefully examines Hooke's natural philosophy in order to determine the extent to which he employed active agents in his work. Thorough investigation reveals that although Hooke sometimes refrained from offering causal explanations of the phenomena he studied, there is no solid evidence that he believed active principles were at work in (...)
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  30.  5
    The Content of Science Debate in the Historiography of the Scientific Revolution.John Nnaji & José Luis Luján - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):99-109.
    The issue of internalism and externalism in historiography of science was intensely debated two decades ago. The conclusions of such debate on the ‘context of science’ appear to be a reinstatement of the positivist view of the ‘content of science’ as comprising only ideas and concepts uninfluenced by extra-scientific factors. The description of the roles of politics, economy, and socio-cultural factors in science was limited only within the ‘context of science’. This article seeks to resituate the ‘content of science’ (...)
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  31.  12
    “Science. Not Just For Scientists. A Historiographical Analysis of the Changing Interpretations of the Scientific Revolution”.Aaron Gasparik - 2013 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 4 (2).
    Traditionally, the Scientific Revolution has been portrayed as an era in history when new developments in fields of ‘scientific’ thought eclipsed the long-held notions presented by religion and philosophy. Historical interpretations subscribing to this view have often presented the Scientific Revolution as a time when significant changes occurred in the way societies understood their world. These historical analyses have focused on a limited suite of ideas – the iconic figures of the Scientific Revolution, (...)
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  32.  14
    The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and The. [REVIEW]Charlie Huenemann - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):321-322.
    It can be fairly said that the Fall of Adam is not much on the minds of scientists nowadays. But apparently it was in the days of the scientific revolution. Jones reads Descartes, Pascal, and Leibniz as all discovering in the new science different implications for our ruined natural state. For these thinkers , the Fall meant losing epistemic privileges and moral attunement. Losing Eden meant losing our place in the universe. And the promise of the new science, (...)
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  33. Paracelsus' "Astronomia Magna" : Bible-Based Science and the Religious Roots of the Scientific Revolution.Dane T. Daniel - 2003 - Dissertation, Indiana University
    Focusing on the Astronomia Magna, the magnum opus of Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim, or Paracelsus, the dissertation provides a detailed look into Paracelsus ' oft-neglected and misrepresented views on the make-up of humans and the universe, and highlights the religious values fundamental to the formation, expression, and reception of his science, Robert K. Merton and Reijer Hookyaas have helpfully pointed to salient religious factors in the development of modern science, but they overemphasize seventeenth-century English Calvinism. A century earlier, Paracelsus had (...)
     
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  34. The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue.Matthew L. Jones - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    Amid the unrest, dislocation, and uncertainty of seventeenth-century Europe, readers seeking consolation and assurance turned to philosophical and scientific books that offered ways of conquering fears and training the mind—guidance for living a good life. _The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution_ presents a triptych showing how three key early modern scientists, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, and Gottfried Leibniz, envisioned their new work as useful for cultivating virtue and for pursuing a good life. Their scientific and philosophical (...)
     
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  35.  57
    Did a Scientific Revolution Occur in Linguistics?Morton E. Winston - 1976 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:25-33.
    This paper contests the view that the events which have taken place in linguistics following the syntactic theories of N. Chomsky conform to the pattern of scientific development described in Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Specifically, it is argued that neither Kuhn's claims about the nature of 'normal science', nor those about the necessity of crisis preceding periods of revolutionary change, nor those about 'paradigms' succeeding one another in the history of a science, find any confirmation in (...)
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  36.  4
    Virtue in the Scientific Revolution.”.Rose-Mary Sargent - 2005 - In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa. pp. 71--80.
    Experimental philosophers of 17th-century England recognized a complex relationship between scientific values and civic virtues. Francis Bacon, motivated by his desire to promote the common good by producing useful knowledge, noted that the advancement of learning required a cooperative research effort guided by civility, charity, toleration, and intellectual modesty. This essay examines how the founders of the Royal Society of London, including Robert Boyle, put his advice into action by their efforts to establish an expanded and inclusive society of (...)
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  37. The Death of Nature Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution.Carolyn Merchant - 1980
     
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  38. Descartes and the Scientific Revolution: Some Kuhnian Reflections.Daniel Garber - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (4):405-422.
    Important to Kuhn's account of scientific change is the observation that when paradigms are in competition with one another, there is a curious breakdown of rational argument and communication between adherents of competing programs. He attributed this to the fact that competing paradigms are incommensurable. The incommensurability thesis centrally involves the claim that there is a deep conceptual gap between competing paradigms in science. In this paper I argue that in one important case of competing paradigms, the Aristotelian explanation (...)
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  39. Geography, Science, and the Scientific Revolution.Charles W. J. Withers - 2005 - In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  40.  13
    Evolution of Prokaryotes: A Kuhnian Scientific Revolution.Janine F. Guespin-Michel - 1997 - Acta Biotheoretica 45 (3-4):221-226.
    The conviction, due to previous failures, that bacteriology and darwinism were incompatible, has postponed the application of molecular phylogenesis to bacteria. But once introduced, this new field has led to a profound revolution of this science. A stable classification of the bacteria is at last possible; a new domain, the Archae, as distant from the Bacteria as from the Eukarya, has been discovered; noncultivable new species can be identified from the environment. It may even be possible to unravel the (...)
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  41. National Styles in Science: A Possible Factor in the Scientific Revolution?John Henry - 2005 - In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  42. William Harvey and the Use of Purpose in the Scientific Revolution: Cosmos by Chance or Universe by Design?Emerson Thomas McMullen - 1998 - Upa.
    This book presents several new ideas in the history and philosophy of science. Against the backdrop of the major events of William Harvey's times, the author provides new insights into Harvey's discovery of the blood's circulation. A major theme is how Harvey and other scientists based their work on the concept that God created the universe purposefully. The author also develops a new, historically-based pattern of scientific discovery and advance.
     
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  43. Maxwellian Scientific Revolution: Reconciliation of Research Programmes of Young-Fresnel,Ampere-Weber and Faraday.Rinat M. Nugayev (ed.) - 2013 - Kazan University Press.
    Maxwellian electrodynamics genesis is considered in the light of the author’s theory change model previously tried on the Copernican and the Einstein revolutions. It is shown that in the case considered a genuine new theory is constructed as a result of the old pre-maxwellian programmes reconciliation: the electrodynamics of Ampere-Weber, the wave theory of Fresnel and Young and Faraday’s programme. The “neutral language” constructed for the comparison of the consequences of the theories from these programmes consisted in the language of (...)
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  44. The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and Scientific Revolution.Carolyn Merchant - 1981 - Journal of the History of Biology 14 (2):356-357.
  45. Metaphysics and Measurement Essays in Scientific Revolution. --.Alexandre Koyré - 1968 - Chapman & Hall.
     
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  46.  2
    Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution.Peter Dear - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (1):113-116.
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  47. The Scientific Revolution. A Historiographical Inquiry.H. Floris Cohen & Mikulas Teich - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (1):135.
     
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  48.  77
    Thought Experiments Since the Scientific Revolution.James Robert Brown - 1986 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1 (1):1 – 15.
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  49.  10
    What Happened to Occult Qualities in the Scientific Revolution?Keith Hutchison - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):233-253.
  50.  71
    On the Frontlines of the Scientific Revolution: How Mersenne Learned to Love Galileo.Daniel Garber - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (2):135-163.
    : Marin Mersenne was central to the new mathematical approach to nature in Paris in the 1630s and 1640s. Intellectually, he was one of the most enthusiastic practitioners of that program, and published a number of influential books in those important decades. But Mersenne started his career in a rather different way. In the early 1620s, Mersenne was known in Paris primarily as a writer on religious topics, and a staunch defender of Aristotle against attacks by those who would replace (...)
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