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  1. Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper reports an ongoing research (...)
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  2. Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
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  3. Donald Baack, Christine Fogliasso & James Harris (2000). The Personal Imapact of Ethical Decisiosn: A Social Penetration Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):39 - 49.
    There are gaps in the Social and Ethical issues literature regarding the structure of individual ethical reasoning and the process through which personal ethical standards erode or decline. Social Penetration Theory may be used to view ethical issues of low, moderate, or high salience. It also produces a model of the process by which an individual turns to less desirable ethical reasoning and behavior.
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  4. Adam D. Bailey (2011). The Nonworseness Claim and the Moral Permissibility of Better-Than-Permissible Acts. Philosophia 39 (2):237-250.
    Grounded in what Alan Wertheimer terms the nonworseness claim, it is thought by some philosophers that what will be referred to herein as better-than-permissible acts —acts that, if undertaken, would make another or others better off than they would be were an alternative but morally permissible act to be undertaken—are necessarily morally permissible. What, other than a bout of irrationality, it may be thought, would lead one to hold that an act (such as outsourcing production to a sweatshop in a (...)
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  5. William A. Bain (1994). FOCUS: Teaching Ethical Business* Creating and Using Vignettes to Teach Business Ethics. Business Ethics 3 (3):148–152.
    Brief thumbnail sketches capture group interest and show the relevance of ethical considerations in real life situations. Bill Bain has considerable experience of business and is currently a PhD student at the Management School of London University's Imperial College, 53 Prince's Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG.
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  6. Edward R. Balotsky & David S. Steingard (2006). How Teaching Business Ethics Makes a Difference. Journal of Business Ethics Education 3:5-34.
    This paper introduces a four-stage ethical learning model that we posit will augment the evaluation of the effectiveness of business ethics education. Using the Ignatian (Jesuit, Catholic) methodologies of self-reflection and discernment, comments by 195 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in an American university regarding the relationship between ethical attitudes and business conduct are examined before and after completing a business ethics course. Results suggest that ethics education can 1) raise students’ ethical awareness, and 2) shift ethical attitudes in either (...)
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  7. Kit Barton (2010). An Assessment of Existentialist and Pragmatist Modes of Teaching Business Ethics. Philosophy of Management 9 (3):49-64.
    With increasing public demand for ethical accountability, business schools are experiencing difficulty incorporating relevant training into their programmes. Rakesh Khurana, professor of organizational behaviour at Harvard Business School, has provided an historical account explaining how business schools initially promoted and then abandoned a specific professional identity for their students, which would have included a set of ethical values. It is possible to begin to revive this initial project by incorporating certain philosophical approaches to teaching ethics. The philosophies of both Martin (...)
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  8. Laura L. Beauvais, David E. Desplaces, David E. Melchar & Susan M. Bosco (2007). Business Faculty Perceptions and Actions Regarding Ethics Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):121-136.
    This paper examines faculty perceptions regarding ethical behavior among colleagues and students, and faculty practices with regard to teaching ethics in three institutions over a 4-year period. Faculty reported an uneven pattern of unethical behavior among colleagues over the period. A majority of business courses included ethics, however as both a specific topic on the syllabus and within course discussions. The percentage of courses with ethics discussions increased in 2006, however, the time allocated to these discussions decreased. These results suggest (...)
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  9. Shannon Joseph Bellamy (1994). The Use of the Case Discussion Method in the Teaching of Business Ethics: A Philosophical Investigation. Dissertation, The University of Utah
    The primary pedagogical technique used in the teaching of business ethics in the university setting is the "case discussion method," which originated at the Harvard Business School and is often referred to as the "Harvard Case Method." The case discussion method is a successful pedagogical technique for a wide spectrum of topics and courses in the business school. I argue, however, that the case discussion method is not appropriate as the primary pedagogical method for the teaching of business ethics. It (...)
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  10. Jason Berger & Cornelius B. Pratt (1998). Teaching Business-Communication Ethics with Controversial Films. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (16):1817-1823.
    Two recent films by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, David Mamet, can provide opportunities for observing student reactions to ethically troublesome situations and for discussing business-communication ethics in the classroom. The key question addressed in this article is whether business-communication courses, for example, those in public relations, can encourage students to make the "metaphoric leap" and apply Mamet's messages to class readings and discussions on ethical problems or challenges. Through showing two films in their entirety and conducting focus groups among upper-level undergraduates, (...)
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  11. Janet Borgerson (2007). On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics. Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  12. Janet Borgerson, Jonathan Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson (2009). Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Identity. Business Ethics - A European Review 18 (3):209-223.
    This article investigates conceptual and strategic relationships between corporate identity, organizational identity and ethics, utilizing the Benetton Corporation as an illustrative case study. Although much attention has been given to visual aspects of Benetton's renowned ethical brand building efforts, few studies have looked at how Benetton's employees, retail environments, and trade events express ethical aspects of their well-known corporate identity. Operational identity emerged as a useful complement to models of corporate identity. A multi-method case study, including interviews at retail outlets (...)
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  13. Norman E. Bowie (2004). What I Try to Achieve by Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):7-9.
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  14. George G. Brenkert (1997). Radical Feminism and Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:95-104.
  15. Todd Bridgman (2010). Beyond the Manager's Moral Dilemma: Rethinking the 'Ideal-Type' Business Ethics Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):311 - 322.
    Case teaching occupies a central place in the history of business education and in recognition of its significance, the Journal of Business Ethics recently created a new section for cases. Typically, business ethics cases are used to teach moral reasoning by exposing students to real-life situations which puts them in the position of a decision-maker faced with a moral dilemma. Drawing on a critical management studies' (CMS) critique of mainstream business ethics, this article argues that this 'idealtype' decision-focused case underplays (...)
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  16. Johannes Brinkmann & Ronald R. Sims (2001). Stakeholder-Sensitive Business Ethics Teaching. Teaching Business Ethics 5 (2):171-193.
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  17. James M. Brown (1987). On Applying Ethics: James M. Brown. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:81-93.
    Applied ethics work seems to me to be of three main kinds. There is participatory work, where a person whose specialism is ethics participates in a process leading to ethical judgments or decisions. And there are two kinds of teaching work where the teaching objective is to make learners better placed to participate in such processes; one kind of teaching work relates to matters which are specific to the future occupation of the learner, the other kind relates to matters which (...)
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  18. Kate M. Brown (1994). Using Role Play to Integrate Ethics Into the Business Curriculum a Financial Management Example. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):105 - 110.
    Calls for increasing integration of ethical considerations into business education are well documented. Business graduates are perceived to be ethically naive at best, and at worst, constrained in their moral development by the lack of ethical content in their courses. The pedagogic concern is to find effective methods of incorporating ethics into the fabric of business education. The purpose of this paper is to suggest and illustrate role play as an appropriate method for integrating ethical concerns.
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  19. Bruce Buchanan & Edwin Hartman (2007). Teaching Ethics to Business Professors. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:521-523.
    The Stern School is undertaking a program to teach business ethics to Stern professors and others who have an interest in ethics but no previous formal instruction. The two-year series of faculty seminars will produce a cadre of professors who are well equipped to do research, to write scholarly papers, and to teach business ethics at a high level. The documentation of the seminar series will be available for others to use.
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  20. Anthony F. Buono (2005). Panel: Successful Programs for Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (1):21-27.
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  21. Patricia Calton (forthcoming). Teaching Business Ethics as Innovative Problem Solving in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  22. Heather E. Canary (2011). Using an Ethics Lens for Teaching Communication. Teaching Ethics 11 (2):25-35.
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  23. Jason Childs (2012). Demonstrating the Need for Effective Business Ethics: An Alternative Approach. Business and Society Review 117 (2):221-232.
    ABSTRACTSince the financial crisis, the malfeasance of business leaders has been a recurring theme in the news, along with calls for increased regulation and oversight. This focus on the ethics of the business community raises a concern about the ethics of those in business or going into business. The ethics of business people and business students has been explored by a number of researchers using survey techniques. We propose and report the results of an alternative method for investigating unethical behavior (...)
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  24. Christopher J. Cowton & Julian Cummins (2003). Teaching Business Ethics in UK Higher Education: Progress and Prospects. Teaching Business Ethics 7 (1):37-54.
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  25. Steven M. Culver, Ishwar K. Puri, Richard E. Wokutch & Vinod Lohani (2013). Comparison of Engagement with Ethics Between an Engineering and a Business Program. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):585-597.
    Increasing university students’ engagement with ethics is becoming a prominent call to action for higher education institutions, particularly professional schools like business and engineering. This paper provides an examination of student attitudes regarding ethics and their perceptions of ethics coverage in the curriculum at one institution. A particular focus is the comparison between results in the business college, which has incorporated ethics in the curriculum and has been involved in ethics education for a longer period, with the engineering college, which (...)
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  26. Tilden J. Curry & Sharon V. Thach (2007). Teaching Business Ethics and the Social Environment for Business Ethics. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:524-529.
    This paper reports the findings of a survey of business deans from AACSB International member universities to determine attitudes regarding the teaching ofbusiness ethics in schools of business.
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  27. Stuart E. Dawson (2001). Business Ethics Books: A Bookshop Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):401 - 404.
    This paper discusses the extent to which books about business ethics are purchased or read outside of tertiary institutions in Australia, whether the subject is commonly perceived as business, philosophy or both, what range of business ethics books is commonly offered for purchase, and what conclusions might be drawn from the above considerations. Investigation shows that the range and availability of business ethics books is quite limited outside of tertiary institutions, and that the general perception is that business ethics is (...)
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  28. Zhang Dayou (2008). Quality Control for MBA Business Ethics Teaching in China. Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:275-278.
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  29. Richard T. de George (2004). Teaching Business Ethics as a Liberal Art. Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):11-15.
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  30. Julio García Del Junco & Juan García Álvarez de Perea (2008). Evidence-Based Administration in the Teaching of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:35-58.
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  31. Joseph DesJardins, Lori Ryan & James Weber (2006). Overarching Goals of Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 3:83-109.
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  32. Michel Dion (2000). Teaching Business Ethics, or the Challenge of a Socratic-Nietzschean Self-Transcendence for Teachers. Teaching Business Ethics 4 (3):307-324.
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  33. Denis DuBay (1980). Teaching of Controversial Issues. BioScience 30 (1):5-5.
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  34. Thomas W. Dunfee & Diana C. Robertson (1988). Integrating Ethics Into the Business School Curriculum. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):847 - 859.
    A project on teaching business ethics at The Wharton School concluded that ethics should be directly incorporated into key MBA courses and taught by the core business faculty. The project team, comprised of students, ethics faculty and functional business faculty, designed a model program for integrating ethics. The project was funded by the Exxon Education Foundation.The program originates with a general introduction designed to familiarize students with literature and concepts pertaining to professional and business ethics and corporate social responsibility. This (...)
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  35. Bruno Dyck, Kent Walker, Frederick A. Starke & Krista Uggerslev (2011). Addressing Concerns Raised by Critics of Business Schools by Teaching Multiple Approaches to Management. Business and Society Review 116 (1):1-27.
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  36. Nils Elmark (1996). The First European Business Ethics Prize Essay. A Value-Based Approach to European Business Ethics. Business Ethics 5 (3):164–170.
    We are pleased to print here the winning entry for the 1995 European Business Ethics Essay Competition, which was sponsored jointly by the Foundation for Business Responsibilities and London Business School and to which entry was open to students for the MBA or equivalent management degree at any institution in Europe. The author, Mr Nils Elmark, subsequently gained his MSc degree in Public Relations at the Department of Marketing, University of Stirling, and is now with Marks and Brands, St. Kirkstrade (...)
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  37. L. England (1999). Business Ethics, Volume III, Civil Society: An On Line Journal. The English Language Teaching Forum (Electronic Version). Business Ethics 3.
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  38. Linda Felicetti & Karen Stewart (1998). Australian Business Majors and Their Attitudes Toward the Teaching of Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 2 (1):85-92.
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  39. Juan Fontrodona (2004). What Do I Try to Achieve by Teaching Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):17-20.
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  40. Timothy L. Fort & Frances E. Zollers (1998). Teaching Business Ethics: Theory and Practice. Teaching Business Ethics 2 (3):273-290.
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  41. Deloise A. Frisque (2005). Teaching Ethics in a Multicultural Classroom. Teaching Ethics 5 (2):13-30.
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  42. Frederick H. Gautschi Iii & Thomas M. Jones (1998). Enhancing the Ability of Business Students to Recognize Ethical Issues: An Empirical Assessment of the Effectiveness of a Course in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):205-216.
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  43. Frederick H. Gautschi & Thomas M. Jones (1998). Enhancing the Ability of Business Students to Recognize Ethical Issues: An Empirical Assessment of the Effectiveness of a Course in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):205 - 216.
    This paper presents the results of a study of the effect of a business ethics course in enhancing the ability of students to recognize ethical issues. The findings show that compared to students who do not complete such a course, students enrolled in a business ethics course experience substantial improvement in that ability.
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  44. Aviva Geva (2000). The Internet and the Book: Media and Messages in Teaching Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 4 (1):85-106.
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  45. A. K. Giri (1997). Management Education and the Teaching of Ethics: Pedagogy, Practice and the Challenge of a New Initiative. Journal of Human Values 3 (1):3-19.
    This paper examines the issue of teaching of ethics in management education with specific reference to the debate on this and pedagogic interventions in India and the United States. It describes, among others, the initiative taken at Harvard Business School to teach ethics to MBA students as well as the effort made by the Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta to teach ethics and human values to the students. It is argued that all these pedagogic initiatives can help us to be (...)
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  46. Richard S. Glass & Joseph Bonnici (1997). An Experiential Approach for Teaching Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 1 (2):183-195.
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  47. Steven J. Gold (2012). Teaching Business Ethics During the Global Economic Crisis. Philosophy of Management 11 (1):109-114.
    Facing a near-death experience naturally pushes people to re-examine their basic moral values. During the recent global economic melt-down, calls to solve the concomitant ‘moral’ crisis come in from all fronts. The presumption is that we need business ethics courses to teach our business students to learn to take the moral high-road; we need ethics pledges and codes of ethics to teach business students to do the right thing. But in reality, what impact can a business ethics class have on (...)
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  48. Steven J. Gold (2010). The Implications of Rorty's Post—Foundational "Moral Imagination" for Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):299 - 310.
    As one of the most influential commentators on the role of modern philosophy, Richard Rorty's work impacted all areas of philosophical inquiry, including business ethics. Rorty's post-foundational approach to "moral imagination" can inform how we teach business ethics in a diverse and philosophically eclectic manner. A summary of Rorty's critique of philosophy, ethics, and applied ethics will be followed by a discussion of the implications for a critical pedagogy and the pragmatic use of an expansive philosophical lexicon in a business (...)
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  49. K. E. Goodpaster (2002). Teaching and Learning Ethics by the Case Method. In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell
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  50. Charles R. Gowen, Nessim Hanna, Larry W. Jacobs, David E. Keys & Donald E. Weiss (1996). Integrating Business Ethics Into a Graduate Program. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (6):671 - 679.
    Five faculty members in the College of Business at Northern Illinois University received a grant from the James S. Kemper Foundation to integrate ethics into the graduate business curriculum. This was the second phase of a comprehensive program to integrate ethics into the business curriculum. Each faculty member taught a required course in the MBA program. The faculty members represented each of the five functional departments in the College of Business.This paper describes the ethics content, materials, and approaches that were (...)
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