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  1. Jonathan Wolff, Economism.
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  2. Jonathan Wolff & Disadvantage, Avner de-Shalit.
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  3. Jonathan Wolff, Dept of Philosophy UCL.
    The regulation of drugs presents a challenge for liberalism: how can punishing a person for an action that harms only himself or herself be justified? For public policy a related difficulty is to justify the differential treatment of drugs and alcohol. Philosophical arguments suggest that current regulations are unjustified, and that some currently illegal drugs should be treated no more harshly than alcohol. However, such arguments make little or no impact in public policy discussions. This generates a further problem: to (...)
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  4. Jonathan Wolff, Dept of Philosophy.
    One important argument for the free market is that of the ‘invisible hand’ or ‘private vices, public virtues’. That is, individual profit-seeking behaviour by suppliers will lead to better quality, lower priced goods for consumers than could be achieved by other means. Where this is so the market may be to the benefit of all, including the worst off. However, reflection on a range of cases – including what is here called the Titanic Puzzle, introduced by Thomas Schelling - shows (...)
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  5. Jonathan Wolff, The Ethics of Competition.
    Exchange is one thing, economic competition another. Exchange is possible without competition; and economic competition (of sorts) is possible without exchange. Put exchange and competition together and, roughly, you get the free market. There are many philosophical discussions of the free market; a sizeable number about free exchange; but - - aside from in the context of consequentialist defences of the market - - who this century has had much to say about economic competition?
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  6. Jonathan Wolff, Philosophical Argument and Public Policy.
    The regulation of drugs presents a challenge for liberalism: how can punishing a person for an action that harms only himself or herself be justified? For public policy a related difficulty is to justify the differential treatment of drugs and alcohol. Philosophical arguments suggest that current regulations are unjustified, and that some currently illegal drugs should be treated no more harshly than alcohol. However, such arguments make little or no impact in public policy discussions. This generates a further problem: to (...)
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  7. M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.) (2013). Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge.
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  8. Jonathan Wolff (2013). Scanlon on Social and Material Inequality. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):406-425.
  9. Madeleine Hayenhjelm & Jonathan Wolff (2012). The Moral Problem of Risk Impositions: A Survey of the Literature. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):E1-E142.
    This paper surveys the current philosophical discussion of the ethics of risk imposition, placing it in the context of relevant work in psychology, economics and social theory. The central philosophical problem starts from the observation that it is not practically possible to assign people individual rights not to be exposed to risk, as virtually all activity imposes some risk on others. This is the ‘problem of paralysis’. However, the obvious alternative theory that exposure to risk is justified when its total (...)
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  10. Jonathan Wolff (2012). Gerald Allen Cohen 1941-2009. Proceedings of the British Academy 172:49.
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  11. Jonathan Wolff (2012). The Demands of the Human Right to Health. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):217-237.
    The human right to health has been established in international law since 1976. However, philosophers have often regarded human rights doctrine as a marginal contribution to political philosophy, or have attempted to distinguish ‘human rights proper’ from ‘aspirations’, with the human right to health often considered as falling into the latter category. Here the human right to health is defended as an attractive approach to global health, and responses are offered to a series of criticisms concerning its demandingness.
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  12. Jonathan Wolff (2012). The World Gets in the Way. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:32-39.
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  13. Jonathan Wolff, Sarah Edwards, Sarah Richmond, Shepley Orr & Geraint Rees (2012). Evaluating Interventions in Health: A Reconciliatory Approach. Bioethics 26 (9):455-463.
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  14. Jonathan Wolff, Sarah Edwards, Sarah Richmond, O. R. R. Shepley & Geraint Rees (2012). Evaluating Interventions in Health: A Reconciliatory Approach. Bioethics 26 (9):455-463.
    Health-related Quality of Life measures have recently been attacked from two directions, both of which criticize the preference-based method of evaluating health states they typically incorporate. One attack, based on work by Daniel Kahneman and others, argues that ‘experience’ is a better basis for evaluation. The other, inspired by Amartya Sen, argues that ‘capability’ should be the guiding concept. In addition, opinion differs as to whether health evaluation measures are best derived from consultations with the general public, with patients, or (...)
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  15. Avner de-Shalit & Jonathan Wolff (2011). Of Responsibility1. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press. 216.
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  16. Avner de-Shalit & Jonathan Wolff (2011). The Apparent Asymmetry of Responsibility. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oup Oxford.
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  17. Jonathan Wolff (2011). Equality. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
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  18. Jonathan Wolff (2011). Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.
    Train crashes cause, on average, a handful of deaths each year in the UK. Technologies exist that would save the lives of some of those who die. Yet these technical innovations would cost hundreds of millions of pounds. Should we spend the money? How can we decide how to trade off life against financial cost? Such dilemmas make public policy is a battlefield of values, yet all too often we let technical experts decide the issues for us. Can philosophy help (...)
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  19. Jonathan Wolff (2010). Fairness, Respect and the Egalitarian Ethos Revisited. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):335-350.
    This paper reconsiders some themes and arguments from my earlier paper “Fairness, Respect and the Egalitarian Ethos.” That work is often considered to be part of a cluster of papers attacking “luck egalitarianism” on the grounds that insisting on luck egalitarianism's standards of fairness undermines relations of mutual respect among citizens. While this is an accurate reading, the earlier paper did not make its motivations clear, and the current paper attempts to explain the reasons that led me to write the (...)
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  20. Jonathan Wolff (2010). Review of Gijs Van Donselaar, The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, Basic Income. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  21. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disadvantage, Risk and the Social Determinants of Health. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):214-223.
    The paper describes a project in which the thesis of the social determinants of health is used in order to help identify groups that will be among the least advantaged members of society, when disadvantage is understood in terms of lack of genuine opportunity for secure functioning. The analysis is derived from the author's work with Avner de-Shalit in Disadvantage (Oxford University Press, 2007).
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  22. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Cognitive Disability in a Society of Equals. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):402-415.
    This paper considers the range of possible policy options that are available if we wish to attempt to treat people with cognitive disabilities as equal members of society. It is suggested that the goal of policy should be allow each disabled person to establish a worthwhile place in the world and sets out four policy options: cash compensation, personal enhancement, status enhancement and targeted resource enhancement. The paper argues for the social policy of targeted resource enhancement for individuals with cognitive (...)
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  23. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disability Among Equals. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oup Oxford.
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  24. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disability, Status Enhancement, Personal Enhancement and Resource Allocation. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):49-68.
    It often appears that the most appropriate form of addressing disadvantage related to disability is through policies that can be called “status enhancements”: changes to the social, cultural and material environment so that the difficulties experienced by those with impairments are reduced, even eradicated. However, status enhancements can also have their limitations. This paper compares the relative merits of policies of status enhancement and “personal enhancement”: changes to the disabled person. It then takes up the question of how to assess (...)
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  25. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Global Justice and Norms of Co-Operation: The 'Layers of Justice' View. In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge. 16--34.
    Theorists of global justice confront an apparent dilemma. If citizens in the developed world have duties of (socio-economic) justice to those elsewhere on the globe, then it is supposed that the duties must be very extensive indeed, requiring the same concern to be shown for everyone on earth. Those who deny that global obligations are as extensive as domestic obligations seem therefore to have to concede that any obligations beyond borders must be based on charity, rather than justice. The assumption (...)
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  26. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Rational, Fair, and Reasonable. Utilitas 8 (03):263-.
    There can be no doubt that Brian Barry has made an enormous contribution to the clarification of the ideas of justice current in contemporary political thought. In Barry’s Justice as Impartiality he explicitly distinguishes and sets in competition three models of justice: justice as mutual advantage; justice as reciprocity; and justice as impartiality (the ‘rational’, ‘fair’ and ‘reasonable’ of my title), and he argues that we should prefer the last of these. What I want to do here is to consider (...)
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  27. Jonathan Wolff (2008). Agonism, Pluralism, and Contemporary Capitalism: An Interview with William E. Connolly. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (2):200-219.
  28. Jonathan Wolff, Karl Marx. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Karl Marx (1818-1883) is best known not as a philosopher but as a revolutionary communist, whose works inspired the foundation of many communist regimes in the twentieth century. It is hard to think of many who have had as much influence in the creation of the modern world. Trained as a philosopher, Marx turned away from philosophy in his mid-twenties, towards economics and politics. However, in addition to his overtly philosophical early work, his later writings have many points of contact (...)
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  29. Jonathan Wolff (2008). Social Justice. In Catriona McKinnon (ed.), Issues in Political Theory. Oup Oxford.
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  30. Jonathan Wolff, Are There Moral Limits to the Market?
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  31. Jonathan Wolff, Disability in a Society of Equals.
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  32. Jonathan Wolff (2007). Equality: The Recent History of an Idea. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (1):125-136.
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  33. Jonathan Wolff, Health Risks and the People Who Bear Them.
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  34. Jonathan Wolff, Levelling Down.
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  35. Jonathan Wolff, Libertarianism, Utility and Economic Competition.
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  36. Jonathan Wolff, Mean, Mode and Median Utilitarianism.
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  37. Jonathan Wolff, Philosophy at University College London: Part 1: From Jeremy Bentham to the Second World War.
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  38. Jonathan Wolff (2007). Success and Stupor. The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39):35-39.
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  39. Jonathan Wolff (2007). What is the Value of Preventing a Fatality? In Tim Lewens (ed.), Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.
    in Risk: Philosophical Perspectives ed Tim Lewens, Routledge.
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  40. Jonathan Wolff, What Sort of Person Am I? Reproductive Choice and Moral Character.
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  41. Jonathan Wolff & Dirk Haubrich, Economism and its Limits.
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  42. Hillel Steiner & Jonathan Wolff (2006). Disputed Land Claims: A Response to Weatherson and to Bou-Habib and Olsaretti. Analysis 66 (291):248–255.
    In a paper published in this journal we proposed a method for resolving disputed land claims between two parties (Steiner and Wolff: 2003). In essence the proposal is to hold an auction between the disputants in which the land is given to the higher bidder, but the receipts of the auction to the under-bidder. We claimed that under such circumstances both parties can walk away happy: the higher bidder happy to pay the price bid for the land; the under-bidder happier (...)
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  43. Jonathan Wolff (2006). An Introduction to Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The revised edition of this highly successful text provides a clear and accessible introduction to some of the most important questions of political philosophy. Organized around major issues, Wolff provides the structure that beginners need, while also introducing some distinctive ideas of his own.
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  44. Jonathan Wolff (2006). Market Failure, Common Interests, and the Titanic Puzzle. In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press.
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  45. Jonathan Wolff (2006). Making the World Safe for Utilitarianism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 81 (58):1-.
    Utilitarianism has a curious history. Its most celebrated founders – Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill – were radical progressives, straddling the worlds of academic philosophy, political science, economic theory and practical affairs. They made innumerable recommendations for legal, social, political and economic reform, often (especially in Bentham’s case) described in fine detail. Some of these recommendations were followed, sooner or later, and many of their radical ideas have become close to articles of faith of western liberalism. Furthermore many of (...)
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  46. Jonathan Wolff (2006). Risk, Fear, Blame, Shame and the Regulation of Public Safety. Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):409-427.
    The question of when people may impose risks on each other is of fundamental moral importance. Forms of “quantified risk assessment,” especially risk cost-benefit analysis, provide one powerful approach to providing a systematic answer. It is also well known that such techniques can show that existing resources could be used more effectively to reduce risk overall. Thus it is often argued that some current practices are irrational. On the other hand critics of quantified risk assessment argue that it cannot adequately (...)
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  47. Jonathan Wolff & Hillel Steiner (2006). Disputed Land Claims: A Response to Weatherson and to Bou-Habib and Olsaretti. Analysis 66 (3):248 - 255.
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  48. Jonathan Wolff (2005). Rethinking Equality. The Philosophers' Magazine 32:59-63.
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  49. Jonathan Wolff (2004). Training, Perfectionism and Fairness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):285-295.
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