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  1. Robert Bernasconi (1985). The Question of Language in Heidegger's History of Being. Macmillan.
  2. Peg Birmingham (2008). Elated Citizenry: Deception and the Democratic Task of Bearing Witness. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):198-215.
    It has become nearly a truism for contemporary theorists of democracy to understand the democratic space as agonistic and contested. The shadow that haunts thinkers of democracy today, and out of which this assumption emerges, is the specter of totalitarianism with its claims to a totalizing knowledge in the form of ideology and a totalizing power of a sovereign will that claims to be the embodiment of the law. Caught up in these totalizing claims, the citizenry becomes elated. The only (...)
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  3. Stanley Rosen (2001). The Identity of, and the Difference Between, Analytical and Continental Philosophy. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (3):341 – 348.
    This paper intends to invoke the spirit of Hegel as the éminence grise behind analytical and continental philosophy. Both movements can be seen to originate in, or to receive a strong impetus in their development from, a repudiation of Hegel. Even Russell's quest for a systematic logical analysis of language may be seen as an attempt at a quasi- or anti-Hegelian systematicity. The collapse of this systematicity has led to the celebration of difference in both the analytical and continental schools. (...)
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  4. Charles M. Sherover (1991). Some Dimensions of "Heritage". Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):36-47.
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Continental Ethics
  1. Roman Altshuler (2012). The Origins of Responsibility. By François Raffoul. (Indiana UP, 2010. Pp. Xiv + 341.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):217-220.
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  2. Andrew Benjamin (2007). What If the Other Were an Animal? Hegel on Jews, Animals and Disease. Critical Horizons 8 (1):61-77.
    The question of the other appears to be a uniquely human concern. Engagement with the nature of alterity and the quality of the other are philosophical projects that commence with an assumed anthropocentrism. This anthropocentrism will be pursued by way of Hegel's discussion of "disease" in his Philosophy of Nature. Disease is implicitly bound up with race, racial identity and animality, and provides an opening to the question: what if the other were an animal? Any answer to this question should (...)
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  3. Bettina Bergo (2003). Kelly Oliver, Witnessing: Beyond Recognition. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (2):203-212.
  4. Bettina G. Bergo (2002). Simon Critchley, Ethics, Politics, Subjectivity: Or Calculating with the Incalculable. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 35 (2):207-219.
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  5. Ronald Bogue (2012). Deleuze and Guattari's Immanent Ethics: Theory, Subjectivity, and Duration, by Tamsin Lorraine. State University of New York Press, 2011, 191pp., Pb. $23.95, Hb. $75.00, ISBN-13: 9781438436630. [REVIEW] Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1).
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  6. William F. Bracken (2005). Is There a Puzzle About How Authentic Dasein Can Act?: A Critique of Dreyfus and Rubin on Being and Time, Division II. Inquiry 48 (6):533 – 552.
    Dreyfus and Rubin's commentary on Division II of Being and Time raises three closely related puzzles about the possibility of authenticity: (i) how could Dasein ever choose to become authentic, (ii) how could authentic Dasein ever choose to take up any particular possibility, and (iii) how could anything <span class='Hi'>matter</span> to authentic Dasein? They argue that Heidegger has a convincing answer to the first two puzzles, but they find his answer to the third "indirect and not totally convincing" (D&R, p. (...)
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  7. Ian Buchanan (2011). Desire and Ethics. Deleuze Studies 5 (supplement):7-20.
    This paper argues that it is problematic for the future of Deleuze studies that it is difficult if not impossible to answer the question ‘what is the right thing to do?’ from a Deleuzian perspective. It then argues that one of the key reasons Deleuze studies has made limited progress in this area is its over-emphasis on desire and the corresponding tendency to extrapolate ‘ought’ from ‘is’, which as Hume showed is a category mistake. It proposes that to develop a (...)
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  8. Matthew Calarco & Peter Atterton (eds.) (2004). Animal Philosophy: Essential Readings in Continental Thought. Continuum.
    Animal Philosophy is the first text to look at the place and treatment of animals in Continental thought.
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  9. John D. Caputo (1985). Mortality and the Foundations of a Phenomenological Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 15 (1):269-278.
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  10. Clare Carlisle (2005). Creatures of Habit: The Problem and the Practice of Liberation. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (1-2):19-39.
    This paper begins by reflecting on the concept of habit and discussing its significance in various philosophical and non-philosophical contexts – for this helps to clarify the connections between habit and selfhood. I then attempt to sketch an account of the self as ”nothing but habit,“ and to address the questions this raises about how such a self must be constituted. Finally, I focus on the issue of freedom, or liberation, and consider the possibility of moving beyond habit. I emphasize (...)
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  11. Edward S. Casey (2001). Taking a Glance at the Environment: Prolegomena to an Ethics of the Environment. Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):1-21.
    It is remarkable how much we can understand about an environmental problem at a mere glance. By means of a glance - at once quick and comprehensive - we can detect that something is going wrong in a given environmental circumstance, and we can even begin to suspect what needs to be done to rectify the situation. In this paper I explore the unsuspected power of the glance in environmental thought and practice, drawing special lessons for an ethics of the (...)
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  12. Rebecca Comay (1991). Questioning the Question: A Response to Charles Scott. Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):149-158.
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  13. Drucilla Cornell (1992). The Philosophy of the Limit. Routledge.
    Deconstruction both by its friends and enemies has come to be associated with a set of cliches that completely misunderstands its ethical aspiration. It is particularly within the field of law that we can see the ethical force of deconstruction, and also illuminate its concrete and practical importance. In The Philosophy of the Limit Drucilla Cornell examines the relationship of deconstruction to questions of ethics, justice and legal interpretation. She argues that renaming deconstruction "the philosophy of the limit" will allow (...)
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  14. Simon Critchley (2008). Comments on Simon Critchley's Infinitely Demanding. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (2):9-17.
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  15. Carolyn Culbertson (2013). The Ethics of Relationality: Judith Butler and Social Critique. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):449-463.
    This article takes up the work of Judith Butler in order to present a vision of ethics that avoids two common yet problematic positions: on the one hand, the skeptical position that ethical norms are so constitutive of who we are that they are ultimately impossible to assess and, on the other hand, the notion that we are justified in our commitment to any ethical norm that appears foundational to our identity. With particular attention to the trajectory of Butler’s project (...)
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  16. Arne De Boever (2012). Losing Face: Francis Bacon's 25th Hour. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):85-100.
    Spike Lee’s film 25 th Hour begins with an act of violence that it does not show: instead, the viewer hears the sounds of a dog being beaten. The dog’s menacing growl is then transformed into the growling image of Montgomery ‘Monty’ Brogan’s car speeding through New York. Monty spots the dog, and stops. It is only then that the viewer witnesses the results of the film’s ‘foundational’ act of violence: the bloody body of a dog beaten to pulp. When (...)
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  17. Christian Diehm (2003). Gaia and Il y A. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 7 (2):173-183.
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  18. John M. Doris (2009). Genealogy and Evidence: Prinz on the History of Morals. Analysis 69 (4):704-713.
  19. Mihail Dafydd Evans (2008). Infinitely Demanding. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (2).
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  20. David Farrell Krell (1991). A Thought in Full Self-Dispossession: On Charles Scott's the Language of Difference and the Question of Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):142-148.
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  21. Richard Findler (1994). Imaginative Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 24 (1):265-271.
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  22. Richard S. Findler (1997). Kant's Phenomenological Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 27 (1):167-188.
  23. Lauren Freeman (2010). Metontology , Moral Particularism, and the “Art of Existing:” A Dialogue Between Heidegger, Aristotle, and Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):545-568.
    An important shift occurs in Martin Heidegger’s thinking one year after the publication of Being and Time , in the Appendix to the Metaphysical Foundations of Logic . The shift is from his project of fundamental ontology—which provides an existential analysis of human existence on an ontological level—to metontology . Metontology is a neologism that refers to the ontic sphere of human experience and to the regional ontologies that were excluded from Being and Time. It is within metontology, Heidegger states, (...)
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  24. Gregory Fried (2005). Ethics and Finitude: Heideggerian Contributions to Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (1-2):131-135.
    This essay applies elements of Heidegger thought to ethics as a practical discipline. The radical finitude of human existence is not only an ontological matter; it is also located in the moral life, in the ways we come to "be" ethically. Moral values are shown to be responses to finite limit-conditions and to be finite themselves in their appropriation and performance. The notion of being-in-the-world is used to show that the moral sphere cannot be understood as an "objective" or a (...)
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  25. Hans-Georg Gadamer (2009). Friendship and Solidarity (1999). Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):3-12.
  26. Patrick Gamez (2008). Ethics at a Standstill. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (2):205-209.
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  27. R. Gasché (2003). Felicities and Infelicities of a Model: Tragedy and the Present. Review of on Germans and Other Greeks: Tragedy and Ethical Life by Dennis J. Schmidt. Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):287-298.
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  28. Mark D. Gedney (2006). The Hope of Remembering. Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):317-327.
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  29. Erinn Gilson (2013). Review Essay: Ann Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):173-182.
    Review essay of Ann V. Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary.
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  30. Kevin Gray (2007). Existentialist Thinkers and Ethics. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (1):208-210.
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  31. Lisa Guenther (2012). Resisting Agamben: The Biopolitics of Shame and Humiliation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):59-79.
    In Remnants of Auschwitz , Giorgio Agamben argues that the hidden structure of subjectivity is shame. In shame, I am consigned to something that cannot be assumed, such that the very thing that makes me a subject also forces me to witness my own desubjectification. Agamben’s ontological account of shame is problematic insofar as it forecloses collective responsibility and collapses the distinction between shame and humiliation. By recontextualizing three of Agamben’s sources – Primo Levi, Robert Antelme and Maurice Blanchot – (...)
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  32. Karsten Harries (1977). Death and Utopia Towards a Critique of the Ethics of Satisfaction. Research in Phenomenology 7 (1):138-152.
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  33. Gordon Hull (forthcoming). Coding the Dictatorship of ‘the They:’ A Phenomenological Critique of Digital Rights Management. In J. Jeremy Wisnewski Mark Sanders (ed.), Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.
    This paper uses Heidegger’s discussion of artifacts in Being and Time to motivate a phenomenological critique of Digital Rights Management regimes such as the one that allows DVDs to require one to watch commercials and copyright notices. In the first section, I briefly sketch traditional ethical approaches to intellectual property and indicate the gap that a phenomenological approach can fill. In section 2, following Heidegger’s discussion in Being and Time, I analyze DRM technologies as exemplary of the breakdown of things (...)
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  34. Robert Kirkwood (2001). The Green Halo: A Bird's Eye View of Ecological Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (4):477-482.
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  35. Joseph J. Kockelmans (1972). Contemporary European Ethics. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.
    Spiritualist ethics: The problem of evil, by L. Lavelle. On conscience, or On the pain of having-done-it, by V. Jankélévitch. Value and immortality; and, Dangerous situation of ethical values, by G. Marcel. The concept of fallibility, by P. Ricoeur.--Axiological ethics: Ethics and metaphysics, by R. Le Senne. Good and evil, by H. Reiner. Values and truths, by R. Polin. Values as principles of action, by G. Gusdorf.--Three contemporary conceptions of humanism: Jean-Paul Sartre: Sartre on humanism, by J. J. Kockelmans. Moral (...)
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  36. Rebecca Kukla (2002). The Ontology and Temporality of Conscience. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):1-34.
    Philosophers have often posited a foundational calling voice, such that hearing its call constitutes subjects as responsive and responsible negotiators of normative claims. I give the name ldquo;transcendental conscience to that which speaks in this founding, constitutive voice. The role of transcendental conscience is not – or not merely – to normatively bind the subject, but to constitute the possibility of the subject's being bound by any particular, contentful normative claims in the first place. I explore the ontological and temporal (...)
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  37. Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). The Terrifying Concupiscence of Belonging: Noise and Evil in the Work of Michel Serres. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy.
    In this paper I examine the conception of evil and the prescriptions for its mitigation that Michel Serres has articulated in his recent works. My explication of Serres’s argument centers on the claim, advanced in many different texts, that practices of exclusion, motivated by what he calls “the terrifying concupiscence of belonging,” are the primary sources of evil in the world. After explicating Serres’s argument, I examine three important objections, concluding that Serres overestimates somewhat the role of exclusion in perpetuating (...)
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  38. Bryan Lueck (2014). Exposition and Obligation: A Serresian Account of Moral Sensitivity. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 18 (1):176-193.
    In The Troubadour of Knowledge, Michel Serres demonstrates, by means of an extended discussion of learning, that our capacity to adopt a position presupposes a kind of disorienting exposure to a dimension of pure possibility that both subtends and destabilizes that position. In this paper I trace out the implications of this insight for our understanding of obligation, especially as it is articulated in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Specifically, I argue that obligation is given along with a dimension (...)
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  39. Bryan Lueck (2012). Alterity in Merleau-Ponty's Prose of the World. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):425-442.
    I argue in this paper that Maurice Merleau-Ponty provides a compelling account of alterity in The Prose of the World. I begin by tracing this account of alterity back to its roots in Phenomenology of Perception. I then show how the dynamic of expression articulated in The Prose of the World overcomes the limitations of the account given in the earlier work. After addressing an objection to the effect that the account given in The Prose of the World fails for (...)
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  40. Bryan Lueck (2011). The Fact of Sense: Nancy and Kant on the Withdrawn Origin of Moral Experience. MonoKL 10:216-230.
  41. Bryan Lueck (2009). Meaning and Dignity in the Work of Jean-Luc Nancy. Semiotics:416-423.
  42. Bryan Lueck (2008). Toward a Serresian Reconceptualization of Kantian Respect. Philosophy Today 52 (1):52-59.
    According to Immanuel Kant, moral experience is made possible by respect, an absolutely unique feeling in which the sensible and the intelligible are given immediately together. This paper argues that Kant's moral philosophy underemphasizes the role of this sensibility at the heart of moral experience and that a more rigorous conception of respect, grounded in Michel Serres's concepts of the parasite, the excluded/included third, and noise would yield a moral philosophy more consistent with Kant's own basic insights.
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  43. Christopher Mayes (2014). An Agrarian Imaginary in Urban Life: Cultivating Virtues and Vices Through a Conflicted History. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):265-286.
    This paper explores the influence and use of agrarian thought on collective understandings of food practices as sources of ethical and communal value in urban contexts. A primary proponent of agrarian thought that this paper engages is Paul Thompson and his exceptional book, The Agrarian Vision. Thompson aims to use agrarian ideals of agriculture and communal life to rethink current issues of sustainability and environmental ethics. However, Thompson perceives the current cultural mood as hostile to agrarian virtue. There are two (...)
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  44. Christopher Mayes (2009). Pastoral Power and the Confessing Subject in Patient-Centred Communication. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):483-493.
    This paper examines the power relations in “patient-centred communication”. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault I argue that while patient-centred communication frees the patient from particular aspects of medical power, it also introduces the patient to new power relations. The paper uses a Foucauldian analysis of power to argue that patient-centred communication introduces a new dynamic of power relations to the medical encounter, entangling and producing the patient to participate in the medical encounter in a particular manner.
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  45. Peter McCormick (2004). Warfare, Reason, and Moral Truths. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 8 (2):267-274.
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  46. John McCumber (1988). Is a Post-Hegelian Ethics Possible? Research in Phenomenology 18 (1):125-147.
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1 — 50 / 4489