Results for 'Food sharing'

998 found
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  1.  9
    Food-Sharing Networks in Lamalera, Indonesia.David A. Nolin - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (3):243-268.
    Exponential random graph modeling (ERGM) is used here to test hypotheses derived from human behavioral ecology about the adaptive nature of human food sharing. Respondents in all (n = 317) households in the fishing and sea-hunting village of Lamalera, Indonesia, were asked to name those households to whom they had more frequently given (and from whom they had more frequently received) food during the preceding sea-hunting season. The responses were used to construct a social network of between-household (...)
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  2.  24
    Reservation Food Sharing Among the Ache of Paraguay.Michael Gurven, Wesley Allen-Arave, Kim Hill & A. Magdalena Hurtado - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (4):273-297.
    We describe food transfer patterns among Ache Indians living on a permanent reservation. The social atmosphere at the reservation is characterized by a larger group size, a more predictable diet, and more privacy than the Ache typically experience in the forest while on temporary foraging treks. Although sharing patterns vary by resource type and package size, much of the food available at the reservation is given to members of just a few other families. We find significant positive (...)
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  3. The Ethics of Food: A Reader for the Twenty-First Century.Ronald Bailey, Wendell Berry, Norman Borlaug, M. F. K. Fisher, Nichols Fox, Greenpeace International, Garrett Hardin, Mae-Wan Ho, Marc Lappe, Britt Bailey, Tanya Maxted-Frost, Henry I. Miller, Helen Norberg-Hodge, Stuart Patton, C. Ford Runge, Benjamin Senauer, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Anthony J. Trewavas, the U. S. Food & Drug Administration - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In The Ethics of Food, Gregory E. Pence brings together a collection of voices who share the view that the ethics of genetically modified food is among the most pressing societal questions of our time. This comprehensive collection addresses a broad range of subjects, including the meaning of food, moral analyses of vegetarianism and starvation, the safety and environmental risks of genetically modified food, issues of global food politics and the food industry, and the (...)
     
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  4.  5
    Food Sharing across Borders.Barbara Fruth & Gottfried Hohmann - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (2):91-103.
    Evolutionary models consider hunting and food sharing to be milestones that paved the way from primate to human societies. Because fossil evidence is scarce, hominoid primates serve as referential models to assess our common ancestors’ capacity in terms of communal use of resources, food sharing, and other forms of cooperation. Whereas chimpanzees form male-male bonds exhibiting resource-defense polygyny with intolerance and aggression toward nonresidents, bonobos form male-female and female-female bonds resulting in relaxed relations with neighboring groups. (...)
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  5.  16
    A Kind Man Benefits Himself – but How? Evolutionary Models of Human Food Sharing.Thomas Getty - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):563-564.
    Can evolutionary models explain food sharing in traditional human societies? Gurven's analysis cannot rule out any of the models (kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, costly signaling, or by-product mutualism), and quantitative partitioning of relative importance is not feasible. For now, the hypotheses seem like the proverbial blind men examining the elephant: each was partly in the right, and all were in the wrong!
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  6.  11
    Key Variables in Tests of Food Sharing.Margaret Franzen - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):563-563.
    Gurven discusses three key features of food sharing, specifically producer control, need, and contingency. I make two general points regarding the use of these variables in tests of food-sharing hypotheses. First, that these variables are relative, not absolute concepts; and second, that the predictions generated from these variables overlap significantly. In addition, I suggest frequency of sharing as a measure of contingency for the RA hypothesis.
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  7.  13
    The Details of Food-Sharing Interactions – Their Cost in Social Prestige.Amotz Zahavi - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):570-571.
    I agree with Gurven that costly signaling can explain food-sharing phenomena. However, costly signaling may also explain the role of food sharing in deterring rivals. Details of food-sharing interactions may reveal gains and losses in the social prestige of the interacting parties. The evolutionary models of kin selection and of reciprocal altruism are unstable and should be avoided.
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  8.  9
    Insights From Ifaluk: Food Sharing Among Cooperative Fishers.Richard Sosis - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):568-569.
    The fish-sharing patterns on Ifaluk Atoll underscore several limitations of the explanations of food sharing offered by Gurven and suggest that non-foraging labor activities may provide insights into reciprocity and punishment relevant for understanding food-sharing patterns. I also argue that future food-sharing studies should focus on signaling rather than resource holding potential (RHP).
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  9.  9
    Food Sharing at Meals.John Ziker & Michael Schnegg - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (2):178-210.
  10.  2
    Food Seeking and Food Sharing Under Uncertainty.Efrat Aharonov-Majar & Ramzi Suleiman - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
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  11.  9
    An Evolutionary Theory of Food Sharing.Saul Feinman - 1979 - Social Science Information 18 (4-5):695-726.
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  12.  4
    Sharing Food, Sharing Values: Mothering and Empathy in Murik Society.Kathleen Barlow - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (4):339-353.
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  13.  3
    Sharing Food, Sharing Values: Mothering and Empathy in Murik Society.Kathleen Barlow - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (4):339-353.
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  14.  6
    Understanding the Organization of Sharing Economy in Agri-Food Systems: Evidence From Alternative Food Networks in Valencia.Stefano Pascucci, Domenico Dentoni & Isabel Miralles - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (4):833-854.
    Despite the proliferation of sharing economy initiatives in agri-food systems, the recent literature has still not unravelled what sharing exactly entails from an organizational standpoint. In light of this knowledge gap, this study aims to understand which resources are shared, and how, in a heterogeneous set of sharing economy initiatives in the context of food and agriculture. Specifically, this study compares the organization of various forms of alternative food networks, which are recognized to be (...)
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  15.  57
    To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers.Michael Gurven - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily (...)
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  16.  11
    From Sharing Food to Sharing Information.Judith Burkart, Eloisa Guerreiro Martins, Fabia Miss & Yvonne Zürcher - 2018 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):136-150.
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  17.  14
    Interhousehold Meat Sharing Among Mayangna and Miskito Horticulturalists in Nicaragua.Jeremy Koster - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (4):394-415.
    Recent analyses of food sharing in small-scale societies indicate that reciprocal altruism maintains interhousehold food transfers, even among close kin. In this study, matrix-based regression methods are used to test the explanatory power of reciprocal altruism, kin selection, and tolerated scrounging. In a network of 35 households in Nicaragua’s Bosawas Reserve, the significant predictors of food sharing include kinship, interhousehold distance, and reciprocity. In particular, resources tend to flow from households with relatively more meat to (...)
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  18.  9
    Meal Sharing Among the Ye’Kwana.Raymond Hames & Carl McCabe - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (1):1-21.
    In this study meal sharing is used as a way of quantifying food transfers between households. Traditional food-sharing studies measure the flow of resources between households. Meal sharing, in contrast, measures food consumption acts according to whether one is a host or a guest in the household as well as the movement of people between households in the context of food consumption. Our goal is to test a number of evolutionary models of (...) transfers, but first we argue that before one tests models of who should receive food one must understand the adaptiveness of food transfers. For the Ye’kwana, economies of scale in food processing and preparation appear to set the stage for the utility of meal sharing. Evolutionary models of meal sharing, such as kin selection and reciprocal altruism, are evaluated along with non-evolutionary models, such as egalitarian exchange and residential propinquity. In addition, a modified measure of exchange balance—proportional balance—is developed. Reciprocal altruism is shown to be the strongest predictor of exchange intensity and balance. (shrink)
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  19.  15
    Sharing Communion: Hunger, Food, and Genetically Modified Foods.Robert Song - 2004 - In Stanley Hauerwas & Samuel Wells (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Christian Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 388.
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  20. Sharing Food: Christian Practices for Enjoyment.Jana Bennett - 2007 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 27 (2):301-303.
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  21.  11
    Household and Kin Provisioning by Hadza Men.Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (3):280-317.
    We use data collected among Hadza hunter-gatherers between 2005 and 2009 to examine hypotheses about the causes and consequences of men’s foraging and food sharing. We find that Hadza men foraged for a range of food types, including fruit, honey, small animals, and large game. Large game were shared not like common goods, but in ways that significantly advantaged producers’ households. Food sharing and consumption data show that men channeled the foods they produced to their (...)
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  22.  29
    A Proximate Perspective on Reciprocal Altruism.Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (1):129-152.
    The study of reciprocal altruism, or the exchange of goods and services between individuals, requires attention to both evolutionary explanations and proximate mechanisms. Evolutionary explanations have been debated at length, but far less is known about the proximate mechanisms of reciprocity. Our own research has focused on the immediate causes and contingencies underlying services such as food sharing, grooming, and cooperation in brown capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees. Employing both observational and experimental techniques, we have come to distinguish three (...)
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  23.  11
    Sharing, Consumption, and Patch Choice on Ifaluk Atoll.Richard Sosis - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (3):221-245.
    Anthropological tests of patch choice models from optimal foraging theory have primarily employed acquisition rates as the currency of the model. Where foragers share their returns, acquisition rates may not be similar to consumption rates and thus may not be an appropriate currency to use when modeling foraging decisions. Indeed, on Ifaluk Atoll the distribution patterns of fish vary by fishing method and location. Previous analyses of Ifaluk patch choice decisions suggested that if Ifaluk fishers are trying to maximize their (...)
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  24.  7
    Courtship Feeding in Humans?Thomas R. Alley, Lauren W. Brubaker & Olivia M. Fox - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):430-443.
    Food sharing may be used for mate attraction, sexual access, or mate retention in humans, as in many other species. Adult humans tend to perceive more intimacy in a couple if feeding is observed, but the increased perceived intimacy may be due to resource provisioning rather than feeding per se. To address this issue, 210 university students (66 male) watched five short videos, each showing a different mixed-sex pair of adults dining together and including feeding or simple provisioning (...)
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  25.  46
    Devon Acres CSA: Local Struggles in a Global Food System. [REVIEW]Robert Feagan & Amanda Henderson - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):203-217.
    This paper focuses on examining the dynamic nature of community supported agriculture (CSA) and the real-world experiences which mark its contours, often making it distinct from the early idealized CSA “model.” Specifically, our study examines the narratives of the farmers of Devon Acres CSA over its duration, in tandem with a survey of recent shareholders in order to understand and explain its evolution. The framework we develop here shows that this CSA is largely characterized by instrumental and functional beliefs and (...)
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  26.  20
    Why Do Good Hunters Have Higher Reproductive Success?Eric Alden Smith - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):343-364.
    Anecdotal evidence from many hunter-gatherer societies suggests that successful hunters experience higher prestige and greater reproductive success. Detailed quantitative data on these patterns are now available for five widely dispersed cases (Ache, Hadza, !Kung, Lamalera, and Meriam) and indicate that better hunters exhibit higher age-corrected reproductive success than other men in their social group. Leading explanations to account for this pattern are: (1) direct provisioning of hunters’ wives and offspring, (2) dyadic reciprocity, (3) indirect reciprocity, (4) costly signaling, and (5) (...)
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  27.  37
    What is Fair and Equitable Benefit-Sharing?Bram De Jonge - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):127-146.
    “Fair and equitable benefit-sharing” is one of the objectives of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and the FAO International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. In essence, benefit-sharing holds that countries, farmers, and indigenous communities that grant access to their plant genetic resources and/or traditional knowledge should share in the benefits that users derive from these resources. But what exactly is understood by “fair” and “equitable” in this context? Neither term is defined in (...)
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  28.  20
    Understanding Agri-Food Networks as Social Relations.Lucy Jarosz - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):279-283.
    Actor network theory and supply chainmanagement theory provide suggestive researchdirections for understanding regional agri-foodnetworks. These theories claim that relationshipsbased upon trust and cooperation are critical to thestrength and vitality of the network. This means thatexploring and detailing these relationships among thesuppliers, producers, workers, processors, brokers,wholesalers, and retailers within specific regionalgeographies of these networks are critical forfurthering cooperation and trust. Key areas ofcooperation include resource sharing andapprenticeship programs. Employing food networks as akey unit of contextual analysis will deepen ourunderstanding (...)
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  29.  32
    Engagement for Transformation: Value Webs for Local Food System Development. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Block, Michael Thompson, Jill Euken, Toni Liquori, Frank Fear & Sherill Baldwin - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):379-388.
    Engagement happens when academics and non-academics form partnerships to create mutual understanding, and then take action together. An example is the “value web” work associated with W. K. Kellogg Foundation’s Food Systems Higher Education–Community Partnership. Partners nationally work on local food systems development by building value webs. “Value chains,” a concept with considerable currency in the private sector, involves creating non-hierarchical relationships among otherwise disparate actors and entities to achieve collective common goals. The value web concept is extended (...)
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  30.  9
    Nonmarket Cooperation in the Indigenous Food Economy of Taimyr, Arctic Russia: Evidence for Control and Benefit.John Ziker - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):571-571.
    Empirical data on food sharing in native Dolgan, Nganasan, and Nenets communities in Siberia provide evidence for hunter control over big game and fish, as well as likely benefits of inter-household sharing. Most food sharing occurs with kin and, thus, kin-selection-based nepotism cannot be ruled out. Reciprocal interhousehold sharing at meals occurs less often. Social context is discussed.
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  31.  5
    The Archaeology of Becoming the Human Animal.Erica Gittins - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):120-133.
    In the archaeology of early prehistory, human-animal relations are often understood in terms of economy or evolution. Our various hominin ancestors are understood in terms of their development away from non-human animals, while animals themselves are considered as a resource or raw material. But people’s understandings of their own interactions with animals would not have been in these terms: real interactions with animals—including hunting, killing, and eating them—were significant, intimate acts. Using the work of Deleuze and Guatarri, Derrida, Haraway, and (...)
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  32.  13
    A Food Politics of the Possible? Growing Sustainable Food Systems Through Networks of Knowledge.Alison Blay-Palmer, Roberta Sonnino & Julien Custot - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):27-43.
    There is increased recognition of a common suite of global challenges that hamper food system sustainability at the community scale. Food price volatility, shortages of basic commodities, increased global rates of obesity and non-communicable food-related diseases, and land grabbing are among the impediments to socially just, economically robust, ecologically regenerative and politically inclusive food systems. While international political initiatives taken in response to these challenges and the groundswell of local alternatives emerging in response to challenges are (...)
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  33.  97
    Women and the Gendered Politics of Food.Vandana Shiva - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):17-32.
    From seed to table, the food chain is gendered. When seeds and food are in women’s hands, seeds reproduce and multiply freely, food is shared freely and respected. However, women’s seed and food economy has been discounted as “productive work.” Women’s seed and food knowledge has been discounted as knowledge. Globalization has led to the transfer of seed and food from women’s hands to corporate hands. Seed is now patented and genetically engineered. It is (...)
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  34.  4
    Which Communication Channels Shape Normative Perceptions About Buying Local Food? An Application of Social Exposure.Laura Witzling, Bret Shaw & David Trechter - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-12.
    We examined how information from multiple communication channels can inform social norms about local food purchasing. The concept of social exposure was used as a guide. Social exposure articulates how information in social, symbolic, and physical environments contributes to normative perceptions. Data was collected from a sample in Wisconsin. Results indicated that information from communication channels representing symbolic, social, and physical environments all contributed to normative perceptions. We also found that for individuals who frequent farmers’ markets, information from some (...)
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  35.  5
    ‘Fractures’ in Food Practices: Exploring Transitions Towards Sustainable Food.Kirstie J. O’Neill, Adrian K. Clear, Adrian Friday & Mike Hazas - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):225-239.
    Emissions arising from the production and consumption of food are acknowledged as a major contributor to climate change. From a consumer’s perspective, however, the sustainability of food may have many meanings: it may result from eating less meat, becoming vegetarian, or choosing to buy local or organic food. To explore what food sustainability means to consumers, and what factors lead to changes in food practice, we adopt a sociotechnical approach to compare the food consumption (...)
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  36.  10
    Beyond Culinary Colonialism: Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Liberal Multiculturalism, and the Control of Gastronomic Capital.Sam Grey & Lenore Newman - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (3):717-730.
    This article builds on the food sovereignty literature to ask pointed questions about the interplay of market forces and political liberalism. Specifically, we use cuisine as a lens to interrogate the assumption that multiculturalism is compatible with Indigenous food sovereignty. Because multicultural inclusion is the means by which Indigenous Peoples’ gastronomies are commodified and alienated, they experience not gastronomic multiculturalism but culinary colonialism. Accordingly, food sovereignty in colonial contexts must embrace both the active sharing and the (...)
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  37.  8
    Italian Food Suits Korean Women.Antonetta L. Bruno - 2017 - Cultura 14 (1):111-119.
    This paper analyses the attitudes of different genders and age groups toward Italian food in Korea. By asking who consumes it, and with whom, how, when, and why, this paper examines the cross-cultural meaning of Italian food and how it is differently perceived by men and women of different ages in Korea. It argues that Italian food is perceived by consumers as sharing female traits and that this, in turn, lends a particular eating experience.
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  38.  11
    Food for Theologians.Norman Wirzba - 2013 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 67 (4):374-382.
    In this essay, I present eating as a vital theological concern and an integral part of the church’s ministries and mission in the world. I argue that food is not reducible to the status of a commodity but is instead God’s love made delectable. The production and the sharing of good food is a witness to God’s presence among us.
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  39.  54
    Altruistic Cooperation During Foraging by the Ache, and the Evolved Human Predisposition to Cooperate.Kim Hill - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (1):105-128.
    This paper presents quantitative data on altruistic cooperation during food acquisition by Ache foragers. Cooperative activities are defined as those that entail a cost of time and energy to the donor but primarily lead to an increase in the foraging success of the recipient. Data show that Ache men and women spend about 10% of all foraging time engaged in altruistic cooperation on average, and that on some days they may spend more than 50% of their foraging time in (...)
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  40. Brazil's Experience in Implementing its ABS Regime : Suggestions for Reform and the Relationship with the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.Juliana Santilli - 2009 - In Evanson C. Kamau & Gerd Winter (eds.), Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and the Law: Solutions for Access and Benefit Sharing. Earthscan.
     
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  41.  41
    Natural Justice: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow.Ken Binmore - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Natural Justice is a bold attempt to lay the foundations for a genuine science of morals using the theory of games. Since human morality is no less a product of evolution than any other human characteristic, the book takes the view that we need to explore its origins in the food-sharing social contracts of our prehuman ancestors. It is argued that the deep structure of our current fairness norms continues to reflect the logic of these primeval social contracts, (...)
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  42. Strong Reciprocity, Human Cooperation, and the Enforcement of Social Norms.Ernst Fehr, Urs Fischbacher & Simon Gächter - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (1):1-25.
    This paper provides strong evidence challenging the self-interest assumption that dominates the behavioral sciences and much evolutionary thinking. The evidence indicates that many people have a tendency to voluntarily cooperate, if treated fairly, and to punish noncooperators. We call this behavioral propensity “strong reciprocity” and show empirically that it can lead to almost universal cooperation in circumstances in which purely self-interested behavior would cause a complete breakdown of cooperation. In addition, we show that people are willing to punish those who (...)
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  43.  40
    ‘Any Animal Whatever.Jessica C. Flack & Frans Bm de Waal - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict (...)
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  44.  9
    Kin Preference and Partner Choice.David A. Nolin - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):156-176.
    This paper presents a comparison of social kinship (patrilineage) and biological kinship (genetic relatedness) in predicting cooperative relationships in two different economic contexts in the fishing and whaling village of Lamalera, Indonesia. A previous analysis (Alvard, Human Nature 14:129–163, 2003) of boat crew affiliation data collected in the village in 1999 found that social kinship (patrilineage) was a better predictor of crew affiliation than was genetic kinship. A replication of this analysis using similar data collected in 2006 finds the same (...)
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  45.  62
    Psychological Realism, Morality, and Chimpanzees.Harnden-Warwick David - 1997 - Zygon 32 (1):29-40.
    The parsimonious consideration of research into food sharing among chimpanzees suggests that the type of social regulation found among our closest genetic relatives can best be understood as a form of morality. Morality is here defined from a naturalistic perspective as a system in which self-aware individuals interact through socially prescribed, psychologically realistic rules of conduct which provide these individuals with an awareness of how one ought to behave. The empirical markers of morality within chimpanzee communities and the (...)
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  46.  60
    The Origins of Fair Play (Pdf 209k).Ken Binmore - manuscript
    My answer to the question why? is relatively uncontroversial among anthropologists. Sharing food makes good evolutionary sense, because animals who share food thereby insure themselves against hunger. It is for this reason that sharing food is thought to be so common in the natural world. The vampire bat is a particularly exotic example of a food-sharing species. The bats roost in caves in large numbers during the day. At night, they forage for prey, (...)
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  47.  43
    Monkey Business and Business Ethics.Frans B. M. de Waal - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:7-41.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict (...)
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  48.  27
    Corvids Infer the Mental States of Conspecifics.Ashley Keefner - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (2):267-281.
    It is well known that humans represent the mental states of others and use these representations to successfully predict, understand, and manipulate their behaviour. This is an impressive ability. Many comparative psychologists believe that some non-human apes and monkeys attribute mental states to others. But is this ability unique to mammals? In this paper, I review findings from a range of behavioural studies on corvids, including food caching, food recaching and food sharing studies. In order to (...)
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  49.  60
    Economic Institutions as Ecological Niches.Samuel Bowles - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):148-149.
    Economic institutions governing such activities as food sharing among non-kin, the accumulation and inheritance of wealth, and the division of labor and its rewards are human-constructed environments capable of imparting distinctive direction and pace to the process of biological evolution and cultural change. Where differing structures of these institutions take the form of distinct conventions sustained by (near) mutual adherence, small initial differences may support divergent evolutionary trajectories even in the absence of conformist behaviors.
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  50.  21
    Sex Differences in Hadza Dental Wear Patterns.J. Colette Berbesque, Frank W. Marlowe, Ian Pawn, Peter Thompson, Guy Johnson & Audax Mabulla - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (3):270-282.
    Among hunter-gatherers, the sharing of male and female foods is often assumed to result in virtually the same diet for males and females. Although food sharing is widespread among the hunting and gathering Hadza of Tanzania, women were observed eating significantly more tubers than men. This study investigates the relationship between patterns of dental wear, diet, and extramasticatory use of teeth among the Hadza. Casts of the upper dentitions were made from molds taken from 126 adults and (...)
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