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1 — 50 / 231
  1. added 2020-04-24
    Taste, Traits, and Tendencies.Alexander Dinges & Julia Zakkou - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-24.
    Many experiential properties are naturally understood as dispositions such that e.g. a cake tastes good to you iff you are disposed to get gustatory pleasure when you eat it. Such dispositional analyses, however, face a challenge. It has been widely observed that one cannot properly assert “The cake tastes good to me” unless one has tried it. This acquaintance requirement is puzzling on the dispositional account because it should be possible to be disposed to like the cake even if this (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-02
    美感奥妙和需求进化(Mystery of Beauty Sense and Evolution of Needs).Chenguang Lu - 2007 - Hefei: China Science and Technology University Press.
    It proposes the Need Aesthetics. It uses the needing relationship to explain Human and birds' evolution of beauty sense, bird's colorful plumage and sexual selection.
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  3. added 2020-03-05
    On Beauty: All Roads Disgorge to Black Decay.Francisco Valdez - manuscript
    When Kant begins his judgements of beauty in several step eventually, we reach a nexus to which taste and a certain subjectivity is taken into account. But at the end of the day we ask ourselves why is it beautiful? There are certain objects such as tragic poems and video games that are beautiful deemed beautiful. In this essay I will explore the tension created by Kant’s judgements of beauty and the beauty of tragedy through the medium of poetry and (...)
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  4. added 2020-02-24
    Art Forms Emerging: An Approach to Evaluative Diversity in Art.Mohan Matthen - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    An artwork in one culture and form, say European classical music, cannot be evaluated in the context of another, say Hindustani music. While a person educated in the traditions of European music can rationally evaluate and discuss her response to a string quartet by Beethoven, her response to music in a foreign culture is merely subjective. She might "like" the latter, but her response is merely subjective. In this paper, I discuss the role of artforms: why response can be "objectively" (...)
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  5. added 2020-01-31
    Radical Relativism, Retraction and 'Being at Fault'.FIlippo Ferarri & Dan Zeman - 2014 - In Fabio Bacchini, Stefano Caputo & Massimo Dell'Utri (eds.), New Frontiers in Truth. Cambridge Scholar. pp. 80-102.
    Radical relativism was born with a promise: to account for certain phenomena that opposite views are unable to explain. One example is the phenomenon of “faultless disagreement”, according to which two people, while disagreeing, are not at fault in any substantive way. The phenomena of retraction and assessments of truth in cases of eavesdropping are others. All these phenomena have been claimed to pose serious problems for rival views and be best accounted for within a radical relativistic framework. While “faultless (...)
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  6. added 2020-01-06
    Trump is Gross: Taking Political Taste Seriously.Shelley Park - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (S2):23-42.
    My 5-year-old granddaughter refers to foods, clothes, and people she does not like as “supergross.” It is a verbiage that I have found myself adopting for talking about many things Trumpian, including the man himself. The gaudy, gold-plated everything in Trump Towers; his ill-fitting suits; his poorly executed fake tan and comb-over; his red baseball cap emblazoned with “Make America Great Again;” his creepy way of talking about women ; his racist vitriol about Blacks, Muslims and Mexicans; his blatant over-the-top (...)
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  7. added 2019-07-07
    Feckless Reason.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2014 - In Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & John Robinson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. Oxford: pp. 21-36.
    Empirical research on aesthetic response poses two challenges to philosophy. The more familiar challenge is that scientific explanations of aesthetic responses debunk what we take to be our reasons for those responses. One reaction to this challenge is an accommodation strategy that seeks to reconcile the scientific findings with an improved understanding of our normative reasons. This paper presents a more fundamental challenge: a well-established body of research in social psychology indicates that we routinely confabulate the reasons we give for (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Levinson on the Aesthetic Ideal.Nicholas Riggle - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):277-281.
    In “Artistic Worth and Personal Taste,” Jerrold Levinson develops a problem for those who think we should strive to be “ideal critics” in our aesthetic lives. He then offers several solutions to this problem. I argue that his solutions miss the mark and that the problem he characterizes may not be genuine after all.
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):233-235.
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    George Dickie. The Century of Taste: Philosophical Odyssey in the Eighteenth Century.Shun’Ichi Takayanagi - 1999 - Modern Schoolman 76:319-321.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Critique of Taste. [REVIEW]E. I. R. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (1):123-125.
    A most interesting attempt to weld together a Marxist and a semiotic approach to art. The Marxist insistence upon the historicity of consciousness and the categories in which it expresses itself is accompanied by a systematic semiotically oriented reflection upon the epistemological conditions of meaning. The principal target of della Volpe's project is the Crocean theme that there is something supra-rational conveyed by a work of art, some cosmic feeling or some ineffable content, accessible only to intuition. Della Volpe's position, (...)
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  12. added 2019-06-05
    What Women Want: Quality Art. Perricone - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (3):88.
    Toward the end of “Of the Standard of Taste,” Hume summarizes what it means to be “a true judge in the finer arts.” He says: “Strong sense, united to delicate sentiment, improved by practice, perfected by comparison, and cleared of all prejudice, can alone entitle critics to this valuable character.”1 Throughout the essay, he also claims that his position is commonsensical and naturalistic—that is, notwithstanding the diversity of opinion among critics, there is a “structure of the mind . . . (...)
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  13. added 2019-05-02
    The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
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  14. added 2019-03-25
    Disputing Taste.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2017 - In James O. Young (ed.), The Semantics of Aesthetic Judgement. Oxford: pp. 61-81.
    Philosophers have championed contextualist and relativist semantics for aesthetic discourse that attempt to explain faultless disagreement. However, both types of semantics do a good job explaining faultless disagreement. As a rule, more explananda assist in theory choice. This chapter proposes that three more facts need explaining. Aesthetic disputes revolve around objects, even as they express attitudes. They also extend into lengthy exchanges wherein reasons are offered and withdrawn. Finally, they play a role in the formation and regulation of aesthetic practices. (...)
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  15. added 2019-01-02
    Toward a Science of Criticism: Aesthetic Values, Human Nature, and the Standard of Taste.Collier Mark - 2014 - In Cognition, Literature, and History. Routledge. pp. 229-242.
    The aesthetic skeptic maintains that it is futile to dispute about taste. One and the same work of art might appear beautiful to one person but repellent to another, and we have no reason to prefer one or another of these conflicting verdicts. Hume argues that the skeptic, however, moves too quickly. The crucial question is whether qualified critics will agree on their evaluations. And the skeptic fails to provide sufficient evidence that their verdicts will diverge. We have reason to (...)
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  16. added 2018-11-28
    The Concept of the Aesthetic.James Shelley - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Introduced into the philosophical lexicon during the Eighteenth Century, the term ‘aesthetic’ has come to be used to designate, among other things, a kind of object, a kind of judgment, a kind of attitude, a kind of experience, and a kind of value. For the most part, aesthetic theories have divided over questions particular to one or another of these designations: whether artworks are necessarily aesthetic objects; how to square the allegedly perceptual basis of aesthetic judgments with the fact that (...)
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  17. added 2018-11-28
    Hume and the Value of the Beautiful.J. Shelley - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):213-222.
    Hume is plausibly interpreted as asserting that an artwork is beautiful if and only if it pleases ideal critics. Jerrold Levinson maintains that Hume's commitment to this biconditional gives rise to a problem that occurs neither to Hume nor to his any of his interpreters—the problem of explaining why you should care what pleases ideal critics if you are not one yourself. I argue that this problem arises only if you hold an empiricist theory of aesthetic value—that is, a theory (...)
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  18. added 2018-10-29
    Eighteenth Century British Aesthetics.James Shelley - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    18th-century British aesthetics addressed itself to a variety of questions: What is taste? What is beauty? Is there is a standard of taste and of beauty? What is the relation between the beauty of nature and that of artistic representation? What is the relation between one fine art and another? How ought the fine arts be ranked one against another? What is the nature of the sublime and ought it be ranked with the beautiful? What is the nature of genius (...)
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  19. added 2018-09-22
    De Pulchritudine Non Est Disputandum? A Cross‐Cultural Investigation of the Alleged Intersubjective Validity of Aesthetic Judgment.Florian Cova, Christopher Y. Olivola, Edouard Machery, Stephen Stich, David Rose, Mario Alai, Adriano Angelucci, Renatas Berniūnas, Emma E. Buchtel, Amita Chatterjee, Hyundeuk Cheon, In-Rae Cho, Daniel Cohnitz, Vilius Dranseika, Ángeles E. Lagos, Laleh Ghadakpour, Maurice Grinberg, Ivar Hannikainen, Takaaki Hashimoto, Amir Horowitz, Evgeniya Hristova, Yasmina Jraissati, Veselina Kadreva, Kaori Karasawa, Hackjin Kim, Yeonjeong Kim, Minwoo Lee, Carlos Mauro, Masaharu Mizumoto, Sebastiano Moruzzi, Jorge Ornelas, Barbara Osimani, Carlos Romero, Alejandro Rosas, Massimo Sangoi, Andrea Sereni, Sarah Songhorian, Paulo Sousa, Noel Struchiner, Vera Tripodi, Naoki Usui, Alejandro V. del Mercado, Giorgio Volpe, Hrag A. Vosgerichian, Xueyi Zhang & Jing Zhu - 2018 - Mind and Language 34 (3):317-338.
    Since at least Hume and Kant, philosophers working on the nature of aesthetic judgment have generally agreed that common sense does not treat aesthetic judgments in the same way as typical expressions of subjective preferences—rather, it endows them with intersubjective validity, the property of being right or wrong regardless of disagreement. Moreover, this apparent intersubjective validity has been taken to constitute one of the main explananda for philosophical accounts of aesthetic judgment. But is it really the case that most people (...)
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  20. added 2018-08-03
    Aesthetic Comprehension of Abstract and Emotion Concepts: Kant’s Aesthetics Renewed.Mojca Küplen - 2018 - Itinera 15:39-56.
    In § 49 of the Critique of the Power of Judgment Kant puts forward a view that the feeling of pleasure in the experience of the beautiful can be stimulated not merely by perceptual properties, but by ideas and thoughts as well. The aim of this paper is to argue that aesthetic ideas fill in the emptiness that abstract and emotion concepts on their own would have without empirical intuitions. That is, aesthetic ideas make these concepts more accessible to us, (...)
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  21. added 2018-06-10
    Haptic Taste as a Task.Nicola Perullo - 2018 - The Monist 101 (3):261-276.
    In this essay I propose a new theory of taste, starting from the assumption of the multisensorial and ecological approach to the senses, as proposed by Gibson in his psychology of perception and by Dewey in his philosophy and aesthetics. In contrast with an optical approach to tastes and tasting, here I propose the concept of haptic taste to describe a perceptual engagement deeply involved in the processes of experiencing food and beverages, although my examples are mostly related to wine. (...)
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  22. added 2018-02-17
    Four Dissertations.David Hume - 1757 - New York: St. Augustine's Press.
    DISSERTATION T. The Natural History of Religion. INTRODUCTION. AS every enquiry, which regards Religion, is of the utmost importance, there are two ...
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  23. added 2017-11-26
    Fitting Attitude Theory and the Normativity of Jokes.Stephanie Patridge & Andrew Jordan - 2018 - Erkenntnis 83 (6):1303-1320.
    We defend a fitting-attitude theory of the funny against a set of potential objections. Ultimately, we endorse a version of FA theory that treats reasons for amusement as non-compelling, metaphysically non-conditional, and alterable by social features of the joke telling context. We find that this version of FA theory is well-suited to accommodate our ordinary practices of telling and being amused by jokes, and helpfully bears on the related faultless disagreement dispute.
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  24. added 2017-09-22
    Virtues of Art: Good Taste.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2008 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):197-211.
    If good taste is a virtue, then an account of good taste might be modelled on existing accounts of moral or epistemic virtue. One good reason to develop such an account is that it helps solve otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics. This paper proposes an alternative to neo-Aristotelian models of good taste. It then contrasts the neo-Aristotelian models with the proposed model, assessing them for their potential to contend with otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics.
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  25. added 2017-08-14
    Aesthetic Taste.Michael R. Spicher - 2017 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Aesthetic Taste Taste is the most common trope when talking about the intellectual judgment of an object’s aesthetic merit. This popularity rose to an unprecedented degree in the eighteenth century, which is the main focus of this article. Taste became a major concept in aesthetics. This prominence was so pronounced that it might seem that … Continue reading Aesthetic Taste →.
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  26. added 2017-07-24
    Nietzsche on Taste: Epistemic Privilege and Anti-Realism.Jonathan Mitchell - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (1-2):31-65.
    The central aim of this article is to argue that Nietzsche takes his own taste, and those in the relevant sense similar to it, to enjoy a kind of epistemic privilege over their rivals. Section 2 will examine the textual evidence for an anti-realist reading of Nietzsche on taste. Section 3 will then provide an account of taste as an ‘affective evaluative sensibility’, asking whether taste so understood supports an anti-realist reading. I will argue that it does not and that (...)
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  27. added 2017-04-13
    Mathematics and Aesthetics in Kantian Perspectives.Wenzel Christian Helmut - 2016 - In Peter Cassaza, Steven G. Krantz & Randi R. Ruden (eds.), I, Mathematician II. Further Introspections on the Mathematical Life. The Consortium of Mathematics and its Applications. pp. 93-106.
    This essay will inform the reader about Kant’s views on mathematics and aesthetics. It will also critically discuss these views and offer further suggestions and personal opinions from the author’s side. Kant (1724-1804) was not a mathematician, nor was he an artist. One must even admit that he had little understanding of higher mathematics and that he did not have much of a theory that could be called a “philosophy of mathematics” either. But he formulated a very influential aesthetic theory (...)
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  28. added 2017-03-06
    Aesthetic Experts, Guides to Value.Dominic Mciver Lopes - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):235-246.
    A theory of aesthetic value should explain the performance of aesthetic experts, for aesthetic experts are agents who track aesthetic value. Aesthetic empiricism, the theory that an item's aesthetic value is its power to yield aesthetic pleasure, suggests that aesthetic experts are best at locating aesthetic pleasure, especially given aesthetic internalism, the view that aesthetic reasons always have motivating force. Problems with empiricism and internalism open the door to an alternative. Aesthetic experts perform a range of actions not aimed at (...)
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  29. added 2017-02-15
    Seeing Culture Through the Eye of the Beholder: Four Methods in Pursuit of Taste.Ashley Mears - 2014 - Theory and Society 43 (3-4):291-309.
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  30. added 2017-02-14
    The Objectivity of Tastes and Tasting.Barry C. Smith - 2007 - In Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine. Oxford University Press. pp. 41.
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  31. added 2017-02-14
    Jukka Gronow, The Sociology of Taste Reviewed By.Jennifer Judkins - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (1):19-20.
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  32. added 2017-02-14
    12 Taste, Sublimity, and Genius: The Aesthetics of Nature and Art.Eva Schaper - 1992 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--367.
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  33. added 2017-02-14
    A Taste Panel Approach to Product Development.M. S. Featherstone - 1965 - In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship. pp. 3--289.
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  34. added 2017-02-13
    The Meaning of Taste Andi the Taste of Meaning.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2008 - In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing About Art: Contemporary Philosophical Debates. Routledge. pp. 30.
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  35. added 2017-02-13
    Come, Give Me a Taste of Shalom.M. Fowler - 2008 - In Winifred Pinch & Amy Marie Haddad (eds.), Nursing and Health Care Ethics: A Legacy and a Vision. American Nurses Association. pp. 210--218.
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  36. added 2017-02-13
    Is Morality a Matter of Taste?Ted Schick - 1998 - Free Inquiry 18:32.
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  37. added 2017-02-13
    Taste, Meaning, and Reality in Art.C. J. Ducasse - 1966 - In Sidney Hook (ed.), Art and Philosophy. New York University Press. pp. 181--93.
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  38. added 2017-02-12
    The Tastes of Wine: Towards a Cultural History.Steven Shapin - 2012 - Rivista di Estetica 51:49-94.
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  39. added 2017-02-12
    On Common Tastes.Birgit Eriksson - 2009 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 20 (36-37).
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  40. added 2017-02-12
    A Taste for the Secret.Nina Pelikan Straus - 2004 - Common Knowledge 10 (2):353-354.
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  41. added 2017-02-11
    Hume and the Joint Verdict of True Judges.James Shelley - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):145-153.
    Malcolm Budd speaks for many when he locates the "principal weakness" of Hume's account of the standard of taste in Hume's "blithe optimism about the uniformity of response of his true judges of artistic value". I argue that Hume's optimism is not blithe. I argue, in particular, that it follows from Hume's definition of a true judge that true judges will never disagree, and that it follows from his appeal to the test of time that true judges will agree often (...)
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  42. added 2017-02-11
    Interactions of Suprathereshold Taste Stimuli.Joseph M. Kamen, Francis J. Pilgrim, Norman J. Gutman & Beverley J. Kroll - 1961 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (4):348.
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  43. added 2017-02-09
    Making Sense of Taste.Erin McKenna - 2001 - Philosophy Now 31:46-46.
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  44. added 2017-02-08
    Hume and the Question of Good Manners.Jan Staněk - 2009 - Estetika 46 (1):29-48.
    The question of manners is important in David Hume’s examination of human nature primarily because of the weight he assigns to the so-called ‘social virtues’. Man is, for Hume, a being that naturally tends to form societies, and the study of human nature is, after all, the study of human sociability, which finds its expression in manners. The present paper shows Hume as a participant in the seventeenth and eighteenth-century discussion about the concept of politeness, a concept which oscillated between (...)
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  45. added 2017-02-08
    A Matter of Taste.Stanley Godlovitch - 1981 - Dialogue 20 (3):530-547.
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  46. added 2017-02-07
    Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine, Edited by Barry C. Smith.A. E. Denham - 2010 - Mind 119 (473):238-243.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  47. added 2017-02-07
    The Taste Culture Reader: Experiencing Food and Drink.D. E. Cooper - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):98-99.
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  48. added 2017-02-07
    Caetano Veloso or the Taste for Hybrid Language.A. Witkowski - 2000 - Diogenes 48 (191):126-134.
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  49. added 2017-02-07
    Prohibition and Taste.Roger Burggraeve - 1994 - Ethical Perspectives 1 (3):130-144.
    John-Paul II’s encyclical Veritatis Splendor examines the commandments, in particular the Decalogue. In so far as it is the expression of ‘natural law’ applicable and reflexively accessible to all, it is a permanent charter not only of Christian inspired ethics but of every human ethic . Using the story of the rich young man, cited in the encyclical’s first chapter, we would like to elucidate in the first part, and in our own way, how prohibitions open the way for freedom (...)
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  50. added 2017-02-07
    Ontology Without Taste.Price Charlson - 1972 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):346-355.
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