Results for 'Harold Feldman'

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  1. CHAPTER| T» WAR» AN INTEGRATE* THEORY «F PERSONALITY 1 By Wsje Bronfenbrenner, Pfe9.Robert Dalton, Harold Feldman, Mary Ford, Doris Kells, Alexander Leighton, Dorothea Leighton, Robert MacLeod & Robin Williams - 1951 - In R. R. Blake & G. V. Ramsey (eds.), Perception. Ronald Press.
     
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  2. The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman.Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) - 2005 - Ashgate.
    This is an edited collection containing papers on intrinsic value, consequentialism, the evil of death, among others.
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  3.  19
    Feldman on Sorensen's Thought Experiments.Richard Feldman - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (3).
  4. FELDMAN'S The Philosophy of John Dewey.W. T. Feldman - 1935 - Mind 44:549.
     
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    The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman.Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael E. Zimmerman (eds.) - 2006 - Ashgate Pub Co.
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  6. Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausibility of Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2004 - Clarendon Press.
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the life that is good in (...)
  7. Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death.Fred Feldman - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    What is death? Do people survive death? What do we mean when we say that someone is "dying"? Presenting a clear and engaging discussion of the classic philosophical questions surrounding death, this book studies the great metaphysical and moral problems of death. In the first part, Feldman shows that a definition of life is necessary before death can be defined. After exploring several of the most plausible accounts of the nature of life and demonstrating their failure, he goes on (...)
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  8. Utilitarianism, Hedonism, and Desert: Essays in Moral Philosophy.Fred Feldman - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Fred Feldman is an important philosopher, who has made a substantial contribution to utilitarian moral philosophy. This collection of ten previously published essays plus a new introductory essay reveal the striking originality and unity of his views. Feldman's version of utilitarianism differs from traditional forms in that it evaluates behaviour by appeal to the values of accessible worlds. These worlds are in turn evaluated in terms of the amounts of pleasure they contain, but the conception of pleasure involved (...)
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  9. Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death.Fred Feldman - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):309-317.
    Abstract According to the Deprivation Approach, the evil of death is to be explained by the fact that death deprives us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had lived longer. But the Deprivation Approach confronts a problem first discussed by Lucretius. Late birth seems to deprive us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had been born earlier. Yet no one is troubled by late birth. So it’s hard to see why we should be troubled (...)
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  10. The Generational Cycle of State Spaces and Adequate Genetical Representation.Elisabeth A. Lloyd, Richard C. Lewontin & and Marcus W. Feldman - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (2):140-156.
    Most models of generational succession in sexually reproducing populations necessarily move back and forth between genic and genotypic spaces. We show that transitions between and within these spaces are usually hidden by unstated assumptions about processes in these spaces. We also examine a widely endorsed claim regarding the mathematical equivalence of kin-, group-, individual-, and allelic-selection models made by Lee Dugatkin and Kern Reeve. We show that the claimed mathematical equivalence of the models does not hold. *Received January 2007; revised (...)
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  11. Against Authenticity: Why You Shouldn't Be Yourself.Simon Feldman - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Simon Feldman explores how the concept of authenticity has become an unrealistic ideal founded on metaphysically confused notions of the self. In Against Authenticity, Feldman argues for the validity and value of inauthenticity in our lives, providing an exciting challenge for studies of ethics, metaethics, metaphysics, and moral psychology.
     
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  12. Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death.Fred Feldman - 1994 - Oxford University Press USA.
    What is death? Do people survive death? What do we mean when we say that someone is "dying"? Presenting a clear and engaging discussion of the classic philosophical questions surrounding death, this book studies the great metaphysical and moral problems of death. In the first part, Feldman shows that a definition of life is necessary before death can be defined. After exploring several of the most plausible accounts of the nature of life and demonstrating their failure, he goes on (...)
     
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  13. The Law of Good People: Challenging States' Ability to Regulate Human Behavior.Yuval Feldman - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Currently, the dominant enforcement paradigm is based on the idea that states deal with 'bad people' - or those pursuing their own self-interests - with laws that exact a price for misbehavior through sanctions and punishment. At the same time, by contrast, behavioral ethics posits that 'good people' are guided by cognitive processes and biases that enable them to bend the laws within the confines of their conscience. In this illuminating book, Yuval Feldman analyzes these paradigms and provides a (...)
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  14.  18
    Victorian Modernism: Pragmatism and the Varieties of Aesthetic Experience.Jessica R. Feldman - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Victorian Modernism: Pragmatism and the Varieties of Aesthetic Experience Jessica Feldman sheds a pragmatist light on the relation between the Victorian age and Modernism by dislodging truistic notions of Modernism as an art of crisis, rupture, elitism and loss. She examines aesthetic sites of Victorian Modernism - including workrooms, parlours, friendships, and family relations as well as printed texts and paintings - as they develop through interminglings and continuities as well as gaps and breaks. Examining the works of (...)
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    Prophetic Politics: Emmanuel Levinas and the Sanctification of Suffering.Philip J. Harold - 2009 - Ohio University Press.
    In Prophetic Politics, Philip J. Harold offers an original interpretation of the political dimension of Emmanuel Levinas’s thought.
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  16. The Ethics of Belief.Richard Feldman - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):667-695.
    In this paper I will address a few of the many questions that fall under the general heading of “the ethics of belief.” In section I I will discuss the adequacy of what has come to be known as the “deontological conception of epistemic justification” in the light of our apparent lack of voluntary control over what we believe. In section II I’ll defend an evidentialist view about what we ought to believe. And in section III I will briefly discuss (...)
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  17. Respecting the Evidence.Richard Feldman - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):95–119.
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  18. The Ethics of Non-Realist Fiction: Morality’s Catch-22.James Harold - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (2):145-159.
    The topic of this essay is how non-realistic novels challenge our philosophical understanding of the moral significance of literature. I consider just one case: Joseph Heller’s Catch-22. I argue that standard philosophical views, based as they are on realistic models of literature, fail to capture the moral significance of this work. I show that Catch-22 succeeds morally because of the ways it resists using standard realistic techniques, and suggest that philosophical discussion of ethics and literature must be pluralistic if it (...)
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  19. Some Puzzles About the Evil of Death.Fred Feldman - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):205-227.
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  20. Immoralism and the Valence Constraint.James Harold - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):45-64.
    Immoralists hold that in at least some cases, moral fl aws in artworks can increase their aesthetic value. They deny what I call the valence constraint: the view that any effect that an artwork’s moral value has on its aesthetic merit must have the same valence. The immoralist offers three arguments against the valence constraint. In this paper I argue that these arguments fail, and that this failure reveals something deep and interesting about the relationship between cognitive and moral value. (...)
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  21. Modest Deontologism in Epistemology.Richard Feldman - 2008 - Synthese 161 (3):339 - 355.
    Deontologism in epistemology holds that epistemic justification may be understood in terms of “deontological” sentences about what one ought to believe or is permitted to believe, or what one deserves praise for believing, or in some similar way. If deonotologism is true, and people have justified beliefs, then the deontological sentences can be true. However, some say, these deontological sentences can be true only if people have a kind of freedom or control over their beliefs that they do not in (...)
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  22. Epistemic Obligations.Richard Feldman - 1988 - Philosophical Perspectives 2:235-256.
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  23. In Defence of Closure.Richard Feldman - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (181):487-494.
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  24. The Good Life: A Defense of Attitudinal Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):604-628.
    The students and colleagues of Roderick Chisholm admired and respected Chisholm. Many were filled not only with admiration, but with affection and gratitude for Chisholm throughout the time we knew him. Even now that he is dead, we continue to wish him well. Under the circumstances, many of us probably think that that wish amounts to no more than this: we hope that things went well for him when he lived; we hope that he had a good life.
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  25. Typing Problems.Richard Feldman & Earl Conee - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):98-105.
    Guided by the work of William Alston, Jonathan Adler and Michael Levin propose a solution to the generality problem for reliabilism. In some respects their proposal improves on those we have discussed. We argue that the problem remains unsolved.
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  26. Desert: Reconsideration of Some Received Wisdom.Fred Feldman - 1995 - Mind 104 (413):63-77.
  27. An Alleged Defect in Gettier Counter-Examples.Richard Feldman - 1974 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):68 – 69.
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  28. Identity, Necessity, and Events.Fred Feldman - 1980 - In Ned Block (ed.), Readings in the Philosophy of Psychology. , Vol.
     
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  29. Adjusting Utility for Justice: A Consequentialist Reply to the Objection From Justice.Fred Feldman - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (3):567-585.
    1. Introduction. In a famous passage near the beginning of A Theory of Justice, John Rawls discusses utilitarianism’s notorious difficulties with justice. According to classic forms of utilitarianism, a certain course of action is morally right if it produces the greatest sum of satisfactions. And, as Rawls points out, the perplexing implication is “…that it does not matter, except indirectly, how this sum of satisfactions is distributed among individuals any more than it matters, except indirectly, how one man distributes his (...)
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  30. The Termination Thesis.Fred Feldman - 2000 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):98–115.
    The Termination Thesis (or “TT”) is the view that people go out of existence when they die. Lots of philosophers seem to believe it. Epicurus, for example, apparently makes use of TT in his efforts to show that it is irrational to fear death. He says, “as long as we exist, death is not with us; but when death comes, then we do not exist.”1 Lucretius says pretty much the same thing, but in many more words and more poetically: “Death (...)
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  31. Narrative Engagement with Atonement and The Blind Assasin.James Harold - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):130-145.
    Two recent novels, Ian McEwan’s Atonement and Margaret Atwood’s The Blind Assassin, are philosophically instructive. These books are interesting, I argue, because they reveal something about understanding and appreciating narrative. They show us that audience’s participation in narrative is much more subtle and complex than philosophers generally acknowledge. An analysis of these books reveals that narrative imagining is not static or unified, but dynamic and multipolar. I argue that once the complexity of narrative engagement is better understood, some prominent philosophical (...)
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  32. Clifford's Principle and James's Options.Richard Feldman - 2006 - Social Epistemology 20 (1):19 – 33.
    In this paper I discuss William J. Clifford's principle, "It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence" and an objection to it based on William James's contention that "Our passional nature not only lawfully may, but must, decide an option between propositions, whenever it is a genuine option that cannot by its nature be decided on intellectual grounds." I argue that on one central way of understanding the key terms, there are no genuine options (...)
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  33. Fallibilism and Knowing That One Knows.Richard Feldman - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (2):266-282.
  34.  83
    Comments on DeRose's “Single Scoreboard Semantics”.Richard Feldman - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 119 (1-2):23-33.
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    On the Breadth and Significance of Niche Construction: A Reply to Griffiths, Okasha and Sterelny. [REVIEW]Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):37-55.
  36. The Open Question Argument: What It Isn’T; and What It Is1.Fred Feldman - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):22–43.
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    A Simpler Solution to the Paradoxes of Deontic Logic.Fred Feldman - 1990 - Philosophical Perspectives 4:309-341.
  38. Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value.Fred Feldman - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (4):339-354.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested marks or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: (a) unimprovability, (b) unqualifiedness, (c) dependence upon intrinsic natures, and (d) incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent – they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of them (...)
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  39.  66
    Foundational Beliefs and Empirical Possibilities.Richard Feldman - 2004 - Philosophical Issues 14 (1):132–148.
  40. Rationality, Reliability, and Natural Selection.Richard Feldman - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (June):218-27.
    A tempting argument for human rationality goes like this: it is more conducive to survival to have true beliefs than false beliefs, so it is more conducive to survival to use reliable belief-forming strategies than unreliable ones. But reliable strategies are rational strategies, so there is a selective advantage to using rational strategies. Since we have evolved, we must use rational strategies. In this paper I argue that some criticisms of this argument offered by Stephen Stich fail because they rely (...)
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  41.  65
    On Judging the Moral Value of Narrative Artworks.James Harold - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2):259–270.
    In this paper, I argue that in at least some interesting cases, the moral value of a narrative work depends on the aesthetic properties of that artwork. It does not follow that a work that is aesthetically bad will be morally bad (or that it will be morally good). The argument comprises four stages. First I describe several different features of imaginative engagement with narrative artworks. Then I show that these features depend on some of the aesthetic properties of those (...)
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  42. Flexing the Imagination.James Harold - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):247–258.
    I explore the claim that “fictive imagining” – imagining what it is like to be a character – can be morally dangerous. In particular, I consider the controversy over William Styron’s imagining the revolutionary protagonist in his Confessions of Nat Turner. I employ Ted Cohen’s model of fictive imagining to argue, following a generally Kantian line of thought, that fictive imagining can be dangerous if one has the wrong motives. After considering several possible motives, I argue that only internally directed (...)
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  43. The Enigma of Death.Fred Feldman - 1992 - Philosophia 21 (3-4):163-181.
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  44.  54
    Vasubandhu's Illusion Argument and the Parasitism of Illusion Upon Veridical Experience.Joel Feldman - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (4):529-541.
    : Vasubandhu, an advocate of the idealist Yogācāra school of Buddhism, argues that the nonexistence of external objects can be inferred from the appearance of nonexistent things in perceptual illusion. The idealist view and the argument from illusion are criticized by proponents of the realist Nyāya school on the grounds that illusory experience is parasitic upon veridical experience. The parasitism objection successfully defeats Vasubandhu's argument from illusion but fails to decisively disprove the idealist view because it remains possible that each (...)
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  45.  80
    Knowledge and Lotteries. [REVIEW]Richard Feldman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (1):211–226.
  46. The Professional Conscience: A Psychoanalytic Study of Moral Character in Tolstoy's the Death of Ivan Ilych. [REVIEW]Steven P. Feldman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (4):311-328.
    Modern professional behavior all too often fails to meet high standards of moral conduct. An important reason for this unfortunate state of affairs is the expansive self interest of the individual professional. The individual''s natural desire for his/her own success and pleasure goes unchecked by internal moral constraints. In this essay, I investigate this phenomenon using the psychoanalytic concepts of the ego ideal and superego. These concepts are used to explore the internal psychological dynamics that contribute to moral decision-making. The (...)
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  47. Reasons Explanations and Pure Agency.Richard H. Feldman & Andrei A. Buckareff - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 112 (2):135-145.
    We focus on the recent non-causal theory of reasons explanationsof free action proffered by a proponent of the agency theory, Timothy O'Connor. We argue that the conditions O'Connor offersare neither necessary nor sufficient for a person to act for a reason. Finally, we note that the role O'Connor assigns toreasons in the etiology of actions results in further conceptual difficulties for agent-causalism.
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  48. Kripke on the Identity Theory.Fred Feldman - 1974 - Journal of Philosophy 71 (October):665-76.
  49. The Principle of Moral Harmony.Fred Feldman - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):166-179.
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    Infected by Evil.James Harold - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):173 – 187.
    In this paper I argue that there is good reason to believe that we can be influenced by fictions in ways that matter morally, and some of the time we will be unaware that we have been so influenced. These arguments fall short of proving a clear causal link between fictions and specific changes in the audience, but they do reveal rather interesting and complex features of the moral psychology of fiction. In particular, they reveal that some Platonic worries about (...)
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