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J. L. Shaw [21]Joshua Shaw [20]Joseph Shaw [17]Jamie Shaw [13]
J. Clerk Shaw [10]James Byrnie Shaw [8]Julia J. A. Shaw [8]James R. Shaw [8]

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Jamie Shaw
University of Toronto, St. George Campus
James R. Shaw
University of Pittsburgh
Clerk Shaw
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
3 more
  1.  91
    Elements of a Theory of Human Problem Solving.Allen Newell, J. C. Shaw & Herbert A. Simon - 1958 - Psychological Review 65 (3):151-166.
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  2.  72
    Welcome to the Wild, Wild North: Conscientious Objection Policies Governing Canada's Medical, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Dental Professions.Jacquelyn Shaw & Jocelyn Downie - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (1):33-46.
    In Canada, as in many developed countries, healthcare conscientious objection is growing in visibility, if not in incidence. Yet the country's health professional policies on conscientious objection are in disarray. The article reports the results of a comprehensive review of policies relevant to conscientious objection for four Canadian health professions: medicine, nursing, pharmacy and dentistry. Where relevant policies exist in many Canadian provinces, there is much controversy and potential for confusion, due to policy inconsistencies and terminological vagueness. Meanwhile, in Canada's (...)
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  3.  56
    Was Feyerabend an Anarchist? The Structure of ‘Anything Goes’.Jamie Shaw - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 64:11-21.
  4. Philosophy of Humor.Joshua Shaw - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):112-126.
    Humor is a surprisingly understudied topic in philosophy. However, there has been a flurry of interest in the subject over the past few decades. This article outlines the major theories of humor. It argues for the need for more publications on humor by philosophers. More specifically, it suggests that humor may not be a well-understood phenomenon by questioning a widespread consensus in recent publications – namely, that humor can be detached from laughter. It is argued that this consensus relies on (...)
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  5.  70
    The Morality of Blackmail.James R. Shaw - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (3):165-196.
    Blackmail raises a pair of parallel legal and moral problems, sometimes referred to as the "paradox of blackmail". It is sometimes legal and morally permissible to ask someone for money, or to threaten to release harmful information about them, while it is illegal and morally impermissible to do these actions jointly. I address the moral version of this paradox by bringing instances of blackmail under a general account of wrongful coercion. According to this account, and contrary to the appearances which (...)
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  6. Truth, Paradox, and Ineffable Propositions.James R. Shaw - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):64-104.
    I argue that on very weak assumptions about truth (in particular, that there are coherent norms governing the use of "true"), there is a proposition absolutely inexpressible with conventional language, or something very close. I argue for this claim "constructively": I use a variant of the Berry Paradox to reveal a particular thought for my readership to entertain that very strongly resists conventional expression. I gauge the severity of this expressive limitation within a taxonomy of expressive failures, and argue that (...)
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  7. Punishment and Psychology in Plato’s Gorgias.J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):75-95.
    In the Gorgias, Socrates argues that just punishment, though painful, benefits the unjust person by removing injustice from her soul. This paper argues that Socrates thinks the true judge (i) will never use corporal punishment, because such procedures do not remove injustice from the soul; (ii) will use refutations and rebukes as punishments that reveal and focus attention on psychological disorder (= injustice); and (iii) will use confiscation, exile, and death to remove external goods that facilitate unjust action.
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  8.  50
    Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. (...)
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  9. De Se Belief and Rational Choice.James R. Shaw - 2013 - Synthese 190 (3):491-508.
    The Sleeping Beauty puzzle has dramatized the divisive question of how de se beliefs should be integrated into formal theories of rational belief change. In this paper, I look ahead to a related question: how should de se beliefs be integrated into formal theories of rational choice? I argue that standard decision theoretic frameworks fail in special cases of de se uncertainty, like Sleeping Beauty. The nature of the failure reveals that sometimes rational choices are determined independently of one’s credences (...)
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  10.  35
    Knowledge Transfer in Theoretical Ecology: Implications for Incommensurability, Voluntarism, and Pluralism.Justin Donhauser & Jamie Shaw - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 77:11-20.
    Well-known epistemologies of science have implications for how best to understand knowledge transfer (KT). Yet, to date, no serious attempt has been made explicate these particular implications. This paper infers views about KT from two popular epistemologies; what we characterize as incommensurabilitist views (after Devitt 2001; Bird 2002, 2008; Sankey and Hoyningen-Huene 2013) and voluntarist views (after van Fraassen 1984; Dupré 2001; Chakravartty 2015). We argue views of the former sort define the methodological, ontological, and social conditions under which research (...)
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  11.  97
    Intentions and Trolleys.Joseph Shaw - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):63 - 83.
    The series of 'trolley' examples issue a challenge to moral principles based on intentions, since it seems that these give the wrong answers in two important cases: 'Fat Man', where they seem to say that it is permissible to push someone in front of a trolley to save others, and 'Loop', where they seem to say that it is wrong to divert a trolley towards a single person whose body will stop it and save others. I reply, first, that there (...)
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  12.  9
    From Beethoven to Bowie: Identity Framing, Social Justice and the Sound of Law.Julia J. A. Shaw - 2018 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 31 (2):301-324.
    Music is an inescapable part of social, cultural and political life, and has played a powerful role in mobilising support for popular movements demanding social justice. The impact of David Bowie, Prince and Bob Dylan, for example, on diversity awareness and legislative reform relating to sexuality, gender and racial equality respectively is still felt; with the latter receiving a Nobel Prize in 2016 for ‘having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition’. The influence of these composers and (...)
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  13.  77
    What is a Truth-Value Gap?James R. Shaw - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (6):503-534.
    Truth-value gaps have received little attention from a foundational perspective, a fact which has rightfully opened up gap theories to charges of vacuousness. This paper develops an account of the foundations of gap-like behavior which has some hope of avoiding such charges. I begin by reviewing and sharpening a powerful argument of Dummett’s to constrain the options that gap theorists have to make sense of their views. I then show that within these strictures, we can give an account of gaps (...)
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  14.  13
    The Spectrum of End of Life Care: An Argument for Access to Medical Assistance in Dying for Vulnerable Populations.Alysia C. Wright & Jessica C. Shaw - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):211-219.
    Medical assistance in dying was legalized by the Supreme Court of Canada in June 2016 and became a legal, viable end of life care option for Canadians with irremediable illness and suffering. Much attention has been paid to the balance between physicians’ willingness to provide MAiD and patients’ legal right to request medically assisted death in certain circumstances. In contrast, very little attention has been paid to the challenge of making MAiD accessible to vulnerable populations. The purpose of this paper (...)
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  15.  53
    Reasonable Faith. By John Haldane.Joseph Shaw - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):830-832.
    © 2013 The Editors of The Philosophical QuarterlyProfessor Haldane's collection of essays covers not only topics of Philosophy of Religion, but issues in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. They are treated not so much from a particular religious viewpoint, or from a philosophical tradition associated with religious principles, but by using materials inspired by such viewpoints and traditions. Haldane is explicitly combating an influential strand of thought in academic philosophy which would exclude such materials in principle, even while the (...)
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  16.  4
    ‘We’Re the First Port of Call’ – Perspectives of Ambulance Staff on Responding to Deaths by Suicide: A Qualitative Study.Pauline A. Nelson, Lis Cordingley, Navneet Kapur, Carolyn A. Chew-Graham, Jenny Shaw, Shirley Smith, Barry McGale & Sharon McDonnell - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  17.  83
    Anomaly and Quantification.James R. Shaw - 2015 - Noûs 49 (1):147-176.
    I argue for two theses about semantically anomalous utterances (more commonly called "category mistakes") like "sequestered slaps reel evergreen rights". First, semantic anomaly generates a unique form of semantically enforced quantifier domain restriction. Second, the best explanation for why anomaly interacts with quantifiers in this way is that anomalous utterances are truth-valueless. After arguing for these points, I trace out two consequences these theses have in semantics and logic. First, I argue they motivate a trivalent semantics on which truth-valueless material (...)
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  18. Socrates and the True Political Craft.J. Clerk Shaw - 2011 - Classical Philology 106:187-207.
    This paper argues that Socrates does not claim to be a political expert at Gorgias 521d6-8, as many scholars say. Still, Socrates does claim a special grasp of true politics. His special grasp (i) results from divine dispensation; (ii) is coherent true belief about politics; and (iii) also is Socratic wisdom about his own epistemic shortcomings. This condition falls short of expertise in two ways: Socrates sometimes lacks fully determinate answers to political questions, and he does not grasp the first (...)
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  19.  4
    Feyerabend and manufactured disagreement: reflections on expertise, consensus, and science policy.Jamie Shaw - forthcoming - Synthese:1-32.
    Feyerabend is infamous for his defense of pluralism, which he extends to every topic he discusses. Disagreement, a by-product of this pluralism, becomes a sign of flourishing critical communities. In Feyerabend’s political works, he extends this pluralism from science to democratic societies and incorporates his earlier work on scientific methodology into a procedure for designing just policy. However, a description and analysis of Feyerabend’s conception of disagreement is lacking. In this paper, I reconstruct and assess Feyerabend’s conception of disagreement, with (...)
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  20.  21
    The Realistic Empiricism of Mach, James, and Russell: Neutral Monism Reconceived ERIC C. BANKS Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014; 217 Pp.; $95.00. [REVIEW]Jamie Shaw - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (3):648-650.
  21.  97
    Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato’s Republic.J. Clerk Shaw - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
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  22.  39
    Gratitude, Self-Assessment, and Moral Community.Joshua Shaw - 2013 - Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):407-423.
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  23.  55
    Negation and the Buddhist Theory of Meaning.J. L. Shaw - 1978 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 6 (1):59-77.
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  24. Moving Forward with a Clear Conscience: A Model Conscientious Objection Policy for Canadian Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons.Jocelyn Downie, Carolyn McLeod & Jacquelyn Shaw - 2013 - Health Law Review 21 (3):28-32.
    A model policy for conscientious objection in medicine.
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  25. Causality: SāMkhya, Bauddha and NyāYa. [REVIEW]J. L. Shaw - 2002 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (3):213-270.
  26.  25
    Absence: An Indo-Analytic Inquiry.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya, Purushottama Bilimoria & Jaysankar L. Shaw - 2016 - Sophia 55 (4):491-513.
    Two of the most important contributions that Bimal Krishna Matilal made to comparative philosophy are his doctoral dissertation The Navya-Nyāya Doctrine of Negation: The Semantics and Ontology of Negative Statements in Navya-Nyāya Philosophy and his classic: Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowing. In this essay, we aim to carry forward the work of Bimal K. Matilal by showing how ideas in classical Indian philosophy concerning absence and perception are relevant to recent debates in Anglo-analytic philosophy. In particular, (...)
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  27.  57
    The Nyāya on Existence, Knowability and Nameability.J. L. Shaw - 1977 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 5 (3):255-266.
    One of the aims of this paper is to discuss the different senses of the term 'existence' as used by the nyaya philosophers. this discussion leads us to a discussion on absence or negation and its role in logic. a discussion on empty terms has also been introduced in this context. according to the nyaya, existence, knowability and nameability are considered as universal properties. the distinction between these universal properties has been discussed in this context. i have also discussed the (...)
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  28.  32
    Empty Terms: The Ny?Ya and the Buddhists. [REVIEW]J. L. Shaw - 1972 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 2 (3-4):332-343.
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  29. Full-Spectrum Reproductive Justice: The Affinity of Abortion Rights and Birth Activism.Jessica Shaw - 2013 - Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):143-159.
    This paper argues that not only is there a relationship between birth activism and abortion activism, but that if empowering women is the goal, the two cannot be separated. By understanding how women's bodies have been controlled and their reproductive lives appropriated, the current pro-choice and birth activist frameworks that are used to advocate for women can no longer be understood to address women’s needs. It is by working through the framework of full-spectrum reproductive justice that women may become truly (...)
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  30.  52
    Analytical Philosophy in Comparative Perspective.B. K. Matilal & J. L. Shaw (eds.) - 1985 - D. Reidel.
    ANALYTICAL PHILOSOPHY IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE: AN INTRODUCTION. The aim of this volume is to extend the horizon of philosophical analysis as it is ...
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  31.  11
    Documenting Genomics: Applying Archival Theory to Preserving the Records of the Human Genome Project.Jennifer Shaw - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 55:61-69.
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  32. Intention in Ethics.Joseph Shaw - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):187-223.
    The use of intention in ethics has been the subject of intense debate for many years, but no consensus has emerged over whether intention is morally relevant, or even how it should be understood. In this paper I wish to make a thorough, though by no means exhaustive, examination of the concept and the concepts around it, some to be seen as near-synonyms, and some as contrasting ideas. My interest is in the ethical use of the concept, though my own (...)
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  33.  2
    The Birth of the Clinic and the Advent of Reproduction: Pregnancy, Pathology and the Medical Gaze in Modernity.Jennifer Shaw - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (2):110-138.
    In conjunction with the growing feminist literature on pregnancy and visualization, this paper uses Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic to demonstrate how the effort to make the interior of the pregnant body visible in medical discourse was a crucial part of the development of the modern medical gaze. In doing so I develop two concurrent arguments. First, I argue that the pathological corpse of the Clinic can conceptually serve as a double for the pregnant body as it emerged in (...)
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  34.  79
    The Virtue of Obedience.Joseph Shaw - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (1):63-75.
    In this paper I give an account and defence of the thought and practice associated with the notion of obedience in religious ethics, especially in reply to the claim that obedience is necessarily unconscientious. First, I argue that it is conscientious to give weight to commands if they are identifiable as pieces of authoritative advice, or, as theists commonly believe, if they have intrinsic moral force. Second, I argue that a theist's strictly moral reasons for fulfilling obligations are not replaced (...)
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  35.  36
    The Continuing Relevance of Ars Poetica to Legal Scholarship and the Modern Lawyer.Julia J. A. Shaw - 2012 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):71-93.
    In this late modern era within which the basic values of life have been reordered (driven by globalisation, the corporate agenda and mass communication technologies), the individual has effectively been reduced to a mere abstraction. It might be argued that the rational, moral and humanistic concept of freedom has, to a great extent, been compromised by a consequent crisis within the intelligentsia. These groups, in particular the gatekeepers of a classical liberal approach to legal scholarship, are caught between the twin (...)
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  36.  76
    Universal Sentences: Russell, Wittgenstein, Prior, and the Nyāya. [REVIEW]J. L. Shaw - 1991 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (2):103-119.
  37.  52
    The Nyāya on Cognition and Negation.J. L. Shaw - 1980 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (3):279-302.
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  38.  20
    Models for Cardiac Structure and Function in Aristotle.James Rochester Shaw - 1972 - Journal of the History of Biology 5 (2):355-388.
  39.  16
    Back- and Fore-Grounding Ontology: Exploring the Linkages Between Critical Realism, Pragmatism, and Methodologies in Health & Rehabilitation Sciences.Ryan DeForge & Jay Shaw - 2012 - Nursing Inquiry 19 (1):83-95.
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  40.  40
    Number: From the Nyāya to Frege-Russell.J. L. Shaw - 1982 - Studia Logica 41 (2-3):283 - 291.
    The aim of this paper is to present the Nyāya concept of number in the light of contemporary philosophy and to show that the Frege-Russell concept of number does not contradict the Nyāya concept of number but rather supplements it.
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  41.  35
    Cognition of Cognition Part II.J. L. Shaw - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (3):231-264.
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  42.  28
    Placebo Acupuncture as a Form of Ritual Touch Healing: A Neurophenomenological Model.Catherine E. Kerr, Jessica R. Shaw, Lisa A. Conboy, John M. Kelley, Eric Jacobson & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):784-791.
    Evidence that placebo acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic pain presents a puzzle: how do placebo needles appearing to patients to penetrate the body, but instead sitting on the skin’s surface in the manner of a tactile stimulus, evoke a healing response? Previous accounts of ritual touch healing in which patients often described enhanced touch sensations suggest an embodied healing mechanism. In this qualitative study, we asked a subset of patients in a singleblind randomized trial in irritable bowel syndrome (...)
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  43. Evidence and Ethics in Occupational Therapy.Justine Shaw & David Shaw - 2011 - British Journal of Occupational Therapy 74 (5):254-256.
    Reagon, Bellin and Boniface argue that traditional models of evidence-based practice focus too much on randomised controlled trials and neglect 'the multiple truths of occupational therapy'. This opinion piece points out several flaws in their argument, and suggests that it is unethical to rely on weaker evidence sources when higher quality evidence exists. Ironically, the evidence that they provide to support their argument regarding different types of evidence is itself very weak.
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  44.  24
    The Nyaya on Double Negation.J. L. Shaw - 1987 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 29 (1):139-154.
  45.  11
    Increases in Eyewitness Confidence Resulting From Postevent Questioning.John S. Shaw - 1996 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (2):126-146.
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  46.  88
    Divine Commands at the Foundations of Morality.Joseph Shaw - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):419 - 439.
    The claim that they are the ‘Divine Command Theory of Morality’ might seem to be the neatest and most obvious way to account for the moral force of divine commands. In this paper I shall argue that the Divine Command Theory fails as an account of God’s relationship with morality, both in terms of coherence and in terms of fidelity to the traditional theist practice of obedience to God, while a more modest account of how God is to be understood (...)
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  47.  55
    Review of Form and Validity in Indian Logic, by Vijay Bharadwaja ; The Word and The World: India's Contribution to the Study of Language, by Bimal Krishna Matilal ;The Basic Ways of Knowing, by Govardhan P. Bhatt ; The Quest for Man, Ed. J. Van Nispen and D. Tiemersma ; Muslim-Christian Encounters: Perceptions and Misperceptions, by William Montgomery Watt ; Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, by Ilai Alon, in Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, Vol. 10 ; Tsung-Mi and the Sinification of Buddhism, by Peter N. Gregory ; Modern Civilization: A Crisis of Fragmentation, by S. C. Malik ; and Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, Ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW]J. Shaw, Vijay Bharadwaha, S. Bhatt, W. Hudson & Ian Netton - 1992 - Asian Philosophy 2 (2):187-210.
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  48. The Application of Divine Commands.Joseph Shaw - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (3):307-321.
    Divine commands are typically held, by theists, to be made not only at the foundations of morality, but also in an 'everyday' setting, when there are already moral considerations applicable to the addressee(s). My aim is to show how a particular command could relate to these pre-existing moral considerations, if it is more than just a repetition of them. If it is right that an action be obligatory, wrong or supererogatory, why would God want to change its status? Anyone can (...)
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  49.  10
    Intention in Ethics.Joseph Shaw - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):187-223.
    The use of intention in ethics has been the subject of intense debate for many years, but no consensus has emerged over whether intention is morally relevant, or even how it should be understood. In this paper I wish to make a thorough, though by no means exhaustive, examination of the concept and the concepts around it, some to be seen as near-synonyms, and some as contrasting ideas. My interest is in the ethical use of the concept, though my own (...)
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  50.  78
    'Saturated' and 'Unsaturated': Frege and the Nyāya.J. L. Shaw - 1989 - Synthese 80 (3):373 - 394.
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