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  1. The Alleged Fascism of Plato.H. B. Acton - 1938 - Philosophy 13 (51):302 - 312.
    In Germany the claim is sometimes made that National Socialism incorporates the best of Plato’s political theory. In this country, too, Bertrand Russell and Mr. R. H. Crossman have emphasized, but with a different intention, the fascist elements in Plato's thought. It has to be admitted that whereas it would be merely laughable to claim that Jesus or Kant were exponents of the fascist philosophy, there is no such glaring incongruity with regard to Plato. It may be of some interest, (...)
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  2. Plato: Moral and Political Ideals.Adela Marion Adam - 1913 - Exclusively Distributed by Light Impressions.
    Originally published during the early part of the twentieth century, the Cambridge Manuals of Science and Literature were designed to provide concise introductions to a broad range of topics. They were written by experts for the general reader and combined a comprehensive approach to knowledge with an emphasis on accessibility. Plato: Moral and Political Ideals by Adela Marion Adam, first printed in 1913, deals with the main substance of Plato's philosophy of ethics and politics, set within the context of his (...)
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  3. Plato's Concern for the Individual Robert William Hall: Plato and the Individual. Pp. 224. The Hague: Nijhoff, 1963. Paper, Fl. 23.40. [REVIEW]Arthur W. H. Adkins - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (01):28-31.
  4. Law and Justice in Plato's Crito.R. E. Allen - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (18):557.
  5. Pigs in Plato: Delineating the Human Condition in the Statesman.David Ambuel - 2013 - In Ales Havlicek, Jakub JIrsa & Karel Thein (eds.), Plato's Statesman: Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium Platonicum Pragense. Oikoymenh. pp. 209-226.
  6. Politics in Plato's "Republic": His and Ours.Julia Annas - 2000 - Apeiron 33 (4):303-326.
  7. Intelligibility in Nature, Art and Episteme.John P. Anton - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:3-9.
    The architectonic principle, as stated in Aristotle's Politics, is related to the arrangement of the arts, the technai, whereby it is argued that the leading art is the politike techne. Plato, in the Gorgias, has argued for an architectonic of crafts. Four technai provide the best, aei pros to beltiston therapeuousai, and they differ from the pseudo-crafts that offer pleasure while indifferent to the beltiston. The principle for arranging the architectonic is the pursuit of the best, whereby each practitioner of (...)
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  8. Plato as Critic of Democracy, Ancient and Contemporary.John P. Anton - 1998 - Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):1-17.
  9. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists.John Peter Anton - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):239-242.
  10. Plato and the Individual.John Peter Anton - 1965 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (2):260-261.
  11. Platōn: Ontologia, Gnōsiotheōria, Ēthikē, Politikē Philosophia, Philosophia Tēs Glōssas, Aisthētikē.G. Arampatzēs & A. Marinopoulou (eds.) - 9999 - Ekdoseis Papadēma.
  12. The Meaning of Plato's Marital Communism.Gavin Ardley - 1969 - Philosophical Studies 18:36-47.
  13. Plato's Objections to Mimetic Art.Bruce Aune - manuscript
    Admirers of Plato are usually lovers of literary art, for Plato wrote dramatic dialogues rather than didactic volumes and did so with rare literary skill. You would expect such a philosopher to place a high value on literary art, but Plato actually attacked it, along with other forms of what he called mimêsis, and argued that most of it should be banned from the ideal society that he described in the Republic. What objections did Plato have with mimêsis? Do those (...)
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  14. Plato's Cretan City.J. A. B. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 14 (3):570-571.
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  15. Plato, Popper and Politics.R. J. B. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):162-162.
  16. The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 1: From Plato to Nietzsche.Andrew R. Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) - 2008 - Broadview Press.
    This comprehensive volume contains much of the important work in political and social philosophy from ancient times until the end of the nineteenth century. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thucydides, Seneca, and Cicero are included along with Plato and Aristotle; Al-Farabi, Marsilius of Padua, and de Pizan take their place alongside Augustine and Aquinas; Astell and Constant are presented in the company of (...)
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  17. Persuasion, Falsehood, and Motivating Reason in Plato’s Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2).
    In Plato’s Laws, the Athenian Stranger maintains that law should consist of both persuasion (πειθώ) and compulsion (βία) (IV.711c, IV.718b-d, and IV.722b). Persuasion can be achieved by prefacing the laws with preludes (προοίμια), which make the citizens more eager to obey the laws. Although scholars disagree on how to interpret the preludes’ persuasion, they agree that the preludes instill true beliefs and give citizens good reasons for obeying the laws. In this paper I refine this account of the preludes by (...)
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  18. A Sociologist's Plato Alvin W. Gouldner: Enter Plato: Classical Greece and the Origins of Social Theory. Pp. Ix+407. London: Routledge, 1967. Cloth, 55s. Net. [REVIEW]H. C. Baldry - 1969 - The Classical Review 19 (01):43-44.
  19. Book Review:The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle. E. Barker. [REVIEW]Sidney Ball - 1907 - Ethics 17 (4):517-.
  20. Plato, Popper and Politics: Some Contributions to a Modern Controversy.Renford Bambrough - 1967 - New York: Barnes & Noble.
  21. “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists.Limin Bao - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the strength of (...)
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  22. Das Bild des Tyrannen bei Platon. By G. Heintzeler. Pp. 124. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 1928. RM. 8.Ernest Barker - 1928 - The Classical Review 42 (05):204-.
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  23. The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle.Ernest Barker - 1906 - New York: Russell & Russell.
  24. Imperial Plato.Jonathan Barnes - 1993 - Apeiron 26 (2):129 - 151.
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  25. Platonism, Moral Nostalgia and the City of Pigs.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):207-27.
    Plato’s depiction of the first city in the Republic (Book II), the so-called ‘city of pigs’, is often read as expressing nostalgia for an earlier, simpler era in which moral norms were secure. This goes naturally with readings of other Platonic texts (including Republic I and the Gorgias) as expressing a sense of moral decline or crisis in Plato’s own time. This image of Plato as a spokesman for ‘moral nostalgia’ is here traced in various nineteenth- and twentieth-century interpretations, and (...)
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  26. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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  27. The Crane's Walk: Plato, Pluralism, and the Inconstancy of Truth.Jeremy Barris - 2009 - Fordham University Press.
    In The Crane's Walk, Jeremy Barris seeks to show that we can conceive and live with a pluralism of standpoints with conflicting standards for truth--with the truth of each being entirely unaffected by the truth of the others. He argues that Plato's work expresses this kind of pluralism, and that this pluralism is important in its own right, whether or not we agree about what Plato's standpoint is.The longest tradition of Plato scholarship identifies crucial faults in Plato's theory of Ideas. (...)
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  28. Plato and Education.Robin Barrow - 1976 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  29. Plato's Theory of Social Progress.E. O. Bassett - 1928 - International Journal of Ethics 38 (4):467-477.
  30. Plato's "Laws": The Discovery of Being.Seth Benardete - 2000 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Laws was Plato's last work, his longest, and one of his most difficult. In contrast to the Republic, which presents an abstract ideal not intended for any actual community, the Laws seems to provide practical guidelines for the establishment and maintenance of political order in the real world. With this book, the distinguished classicist Seth Benardete offers an insightful analysis and commentary on this rich and complex dialogue. Each of the chapters corresponds to one of the twelve books of (...)
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  31. Plato's Analogy Between Law and Painting: Laws VI.769a-771a.Eugenio Benitez - 2010 - Philosophical Inquiry 32 (1-2):1-19.
  32. The Wisdom of Love or Negotiating Mythos and Logos with Plato and Levinas.Silvia Benso - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (3-4):117-128.
    Inverting the sequence of the traditional terms, in Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence Levinas redefines philosophy as the “wisdom of love”. Through an intertwining of Platonic motifs and Levinasian inspirations, the essay argues for a mutually regulated interplay of mythos and logos as a way to regain a sense of wisdom that remains respectful of the elements of otherness in reality-in particular, respectful of the otherness of the Third who, for Levinas, constitutes the ground for politics. That is, the (...)
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  33. Understanding the Role of the Laws in Plato's "Statesman".Sandrine Berges - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (1):5-23.
    In the Statesman, Plato seems to be advocating that in the absence of a true king who will rule independently of laws, the next best thing as far as just rule is concerned is to ad here rigidly to existing laws, whatever they are. The rule of the true king is given as an example of virtuous rule in the sense that virtue politics or jurisprudence holds that laws cannot always deal justly with particular cases. But Plato’s view of what (...)
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  34. Plato on Virtue and the Law.Sandrine Berges - 2009 - Continuum.
    This important monograph examines Plato's contribution to virtue ethics and shows how his dialogues contain interesting and plausible insights into current philosophical concerns.
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  35. Wisdom and the Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato’s Crito.Sandrine Berges - 2004 - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 3.
    One noticeable omission in the otherwise ever flourishing literature on Plato's Crito (and one might say on the early Platonic dialogues in general) is the recognition that Plato is presenting a problem from a virtue ethical angle. This is no doubt due to the fact that Aristotle, rather than Plato is regarded as the originator of Virtue Ethics as a branch of philosophy.1 Plato's own contribution to the discipline is more often than not bypassed.2 This has unfortunate consequences not only (...)
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  36. Plato on Tyranny, Philosophy, and Pleasure.Martin A. Bertman - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (2):152 - 160.
  37. Plato's Political Philosophy.Mark Blitz - 2010 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
  38. Plato's 'Ideal' State.R. S. Bluck - 1959 - Classical Quarterly 9 (3-4):166-.
    In C.Q. N.S. vii , 164 ff. Professor Demos raises the question in what sense, if at all, the state which Plato describes in the Republic can be regarded as ideal, if the warrior-class and the masses are ‘deprived of reason’ and therefore imperfect. The ideal state, he thinks, appears at first sight to be composed of un-ideal individuals. But ‘the problem is resolved by separating the personal from the political-technical areas of control. In so far as they are citizens, (...)
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  39. Self-Censorship in Plato's Republic.Mary Whitlock Blundell - 1993 - Apeiron 26 (3/4):17 - 36.
  40. What in Plato's "Crito" is Benefited by Justice and Harmed by Injustice?Dougal Blyth - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):1 - 19.
  41. Plato's Crito and the Common Good.Dougal Blyth - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):45-68.
  42. Plato on Utopia.Chris Bobonich - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  43. Ferrari (G.R.F.) City and Soul in Plato's Republic. Pp. 130. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2005. Paper, £12, US$17. ISBN: 978-0-226-24437-. [REVIEW]Chris Bobonich - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):43-.
  44. Plato's 'Laws': A Critical Guide.Christopher Bobonich (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Long understudied, Plato's Laws has been the object of renewed attention in the past decade and is now considered to be his major work of political philosophy besides the Republic. In his last dialogue, Plato returns to the project of describing the foundation of a just city and sketches in considerable detail its constitution, laws and other social institutions. Written by leading Platonists, the essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics central for understanding the Laws, such as (...)
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  45. Why Should Philosophers Rule? Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Protrepticus.Christopher Bobonich - 2007 - Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):153-175.
    I examine Plato's claim in the Republic that philosophers must rule in a good city and Aristotle's attitude towards this claim in his early, and little discussed, work, the Protrepticus. I argue that in the Republic, Plato's main reason for having philosophers rule is that they alone understand the role of philosophical knowledge in a good life and how to produce characters that love such knowledge. He does not think that philosophic knowledge is necessary for getting right the vast majority (...)
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  46. Plato's Utopia Recast: His Later Ethics and Politics.Christopher Bobonich - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Plato's Utopia Recast is an illuminating reappraisal of Plato's later works, which reveals radical changes in his ethical and political theory. Christopher Bobonich examines later dialogues, with a special emphasis upon the Laws, and argues that in these late works, Plato both rethinks and revises the basic ethical and poltical positions that he held in his better-known earlier works, such as the Republic. This book will change our understanding of Plato. His controversial moral and political theory, so influential in Western (...)
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  47. Persuasion, Compulsion and Freedom in Plato's Laws.Christopher Bobonich - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):365-.
    One of the distinctions that Plato in the Laws stresses most heavily in his discussion of the proper relation between the individual citizen and the laws of the city is that between persuasion and compulsion. Law, Plato believes, should try to persuade rather than compel the citizens. Near the end of the fourth book of the Laws, the Athenian Stranger, Plato's spokesman in this dialogue, asks whether the lawgiver for their new city of Magnesia should in making laws ‘explain straightaway (...)
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  48. L'anima Della Legge: Studi Intorno Ai Nomoi di Platone.Milena Bontempi & Giovanni Panno (eds.) - 2012 - Polimetrica.
  49. Music and Pedagogy in the Platonic City. Bourgault - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):59-72.
    The gods, however, took pity on the human race, born to suffer as it was, and gave it relief in the form of religious festivals to serve as periods of rest from its labors. They gave us the Muses, with Apollo their leader, and Dionysus; by having these gods to share their holidays, men were to be made whole again . . .That Plato1 regarded music as an extremely powerful means to cultivate morality and good citizenship is well-known.2 In the (...)
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  50. Plato's Political Passions W. R. Newell: Ruling Passion. The Erotics of Statecraft in Platonic Political Philosophy . Pp. VII + 205. Lanham, Boulder, New York, and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. Paper, £20.95. Isbn: 0-8476-9727-. [REVIEW]George Boys-Stones - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (01):55-.
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