This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

284 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 284
  1. added 2019-01-11
    City and Soul in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]Chris Bobonich - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (1):43-43.
  2. added 2018-10-23
    Forced to Rule: Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged As a Reply to Plato’s Republic.Roderick Long - 2007 - In Edward Younkins (ed.), Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion. pp. 89-97.
  3. added 2018-09-18
    The Emergence of Natural Law and the Cosmopolis.Eric Brown - 2009 - In Stephen G. Salkever (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 331-363.
    Two prominent metaphors in Greek and Roman political philosophy are surveyed here, with a view to determining their possible meanings and the plausibility of the claims advanced by those possible meanings.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2018-09-06
    Socrates as the Mimesis of Piety in Republic.Gene Fendt - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (3):243-254.
    The absence of any discussion of the virtue of piety in Plato’s Republic has been much remarked, but there are textual clues by which to recognize its importance for Plato’s construction and for the book’s intended effect. This dialogue is Socrates’s repetition, on the day after the first festival of Bendis, of a liturgical action that he undertook—at his own expense, at the “vote” of his “city”—on the previous day. Socrates’s activity in repeating it the next day is an “ethological” (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2018-06-27
    Forcing Goodness in Plato's "Republic".Christopher Shields - 2007 - Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):21-39.
    Among the instances of apparent illiberality in Plato's Republic, one stands out as especially curious. Long before making a forced return to the cave, and irrespective of the kinds of compulsion operative in such a homecoming, the philosopher-king has been compelled to apprehend the Good (Rep. VII.519c5-d2, 540a3-7). Why should compulsion be necessary or appropriate in this situation? Schooled intensively through the decades for an eventual grasping of the Good, beginning already with precognitive training in music and art calculated to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. added 2018-06-08
    The Wisdom of Love or Negotiating Mythos and Logos with Plato and Levinas.Silvia Benso - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (3-4):117-128.
    Inverting the sequence of the traditional terms, in Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence Levinas redefines philosophy as the “wisdom of love”. Through an intertwining of Platonic motifs and Levinasian inspirations, the essay argues for a mutually regulated interplay of mythos and logos as a way to regain a sense of wisdom that remains respectful of the elements of otherness in reality-in particular, respectful of the otherness of the Third who, for Levinas, constitutes the ground for politics. That is, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2018-04-18
    The Law in Plato’s Laws: A Reading of the ‘Classical Thesis’.Luke William Hunt - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):102-26.
    Plato’s Laws include what H.L.A. Hart called the ‘classical thesis’ about the nature and role of law: the law exists to see that one leads a morally good life. This paper develops Hart’s brief remarks by providing a panorama of the classical thesis in Laws. This is done by considering two themes: (1) the extent to which Laws is paternalistic, and (2) the extent to which Laws is naturalistic. These themes are significant for a number of reasons, including because they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2018-04-05
    Plato's Housing Policy: Then and Now.Debra Nails & Soula Proxenos - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:73-78.
    Plato put housing second only to a secure food supply in the order of business of an emerging polis [Republic 2.369d); we argue, without quibbling over rank, that adequate housing ought to have fundamental priority, with health and education, in civil societies' planning, budgets, and legislative agendas. Something made explicit in the Platonic Laws, and often reiterated by today's poor — but as often forgotten by bureaucrats— is that human wellbeing, eudaimonia, is impossible for the homeless. That is, adequate housing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2018-04-01
    The Platonic Godfather: A Note on the Protagoras Myth.Robert Zaslavsky - 1982 - Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (1):79-82.
    The author shows how Protagoras's notion that justice is teachable because it is behavioral conditioning (punishment) in cities that are gangsterism incarnate.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. added 2018-03-05
    Punishment and Reincarnation.Thom Brooks - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 13:21-37.
    The doctrine of reincarnation is endorsed by various philosophers in both the Western and Eastern traditions. This paper will explore the relationship between reincarnation and legal punishment. Three competing views of reincarnation will be analyzed on this issue: Plato's work on Socrates, the Bhagavad Gita, and Mahayana Buddhism. Each view presents interesting, but different perspectives on how our view of the person might affect how we punish. The paper will claim that there are practical implications on the administration of justice (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. added 2018-03-02
    Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates: Defending the Philosophical Life.Vivil Valvik Haraldsen, Olof Pettersson & Oda E. Wiese Tvedt (eds.) - 2017 - Lexington.
    Contributors to this volume focus on the character of Socrates as the embodiment of philosophy, employing this as a starting point for exploring various themes exposed in the Apology. These include the relation of philosophy to democracy, rhetoric, politics, or society in general, and the overarching question of what comprises the philosophic life.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2018-02-18
    Plato's 'Laws': A Critical Guide.Christopher Bobonich (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Long understudied, Plato's Laws has been the object of renewed attention in the past decade and is now considered to be his major work of political philosophy besides the Republic. In his last dialogue, Plato returns to the project of describing the foundation of a just city and sketches in considerable detail its constitution, laws and other social institutions. Written by leading Platonists, the essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics central for understanding the Laws, such as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2018-02-18
    Politics in Plato's "Republic": His and Ours.Julia Annas - 2000 - Apeiron 33 (4):303-326.
  14. added 2018-02-17
    Politics, Slavery, and Home Economics: Defining an Expert in Plato's "Statesman".George Harvey - 2006 - Apeiron 39 (2):91-120.
  15. added 2018-02-17
    Desire and Power in Socrates: The Argument of "Gorgias" 466A-468E That Orators and Tyrants Have No Power in the City.Terry Penner - 1991 - Apeiron 24 (3):147.
  16. added 2018-01-23
    Socrates’ Failure: Language and Lies in Plato’s Apology.Olof Pettersson - 2018 - In Haraldsen Vivil Valvik, Olof Pettersson & Tvedt Oda E. Wiese (eds.), Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates Defending the Philosophical Life. Lexington. pp. 137-154.
    Plato’s Apology opens with a distinction. By opposing his accusers’ deceitfulness to his own blunt truthfulness, Socrates distinguishes a philosophical manner of speech from its politico-forensic counterpart. This can be said to culminate at 17d3, where Socrates claims to be a stranger (xenos) to the manner of speech—the lexis (17d3)—of the court. He asks to be allowed to talk with his own voice (phônh), in his own way (tropos, cf. 17d5–18a3) and without making fine speeches (“kekalliepêmenous ge logous,” 17b9). In (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2017-11-11
    Plato on the Economy.M. Schofield - 1993 - In Mogens Herman Hansen (ed.), The Ancient Greek City-State: Symposium on the Occasion of the 250th Anniversary of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, July, 1-4 1992. Commissioner, Munksgaard.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2017-10-27
    Politeia - Bordes Jacqueline: Politeia Dans la Pensée Grecque Jusqu'à Aristote. (Collection des Études Anciennes.) Pp. 499. Paris:Les Belles Lettres, 1982. Paper, £15.50. [REVIEW]Trevor J. Saunders - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):83-85.
  19. added 2017-10-25
    Review of Crotty's "The City-State of the Soul". [REVIEW]Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Review of Metaphysics.
  20. added 2017-10-06
    La via platonica alla Interpretazione dei sogni.Marco Solinas - 2017 - ViaBorgogna3 6:66-73.
    Analisi della possibile influenza esercitata dalla lettura di Platone su Freud, e in particolare della teoria del sogno come via per conoscere dei desideri precedentemnte "repressi" esposta nella "Repubblica".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2017-09-19
    Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato’s Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. [REVIEW]Christopher Moore - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):202-209.
  22. added 2017-02-15
    The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2017-02-15
    Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2017-02-15
    Adrift on the Boundless Sea of Unlikeness: Sophistry and Law in Plato's Statesman.Drake Ryan - 2016 - In John Sallis (ed.), Plato's Statesman: Dialectic, Myth, and Politics. Albany, USA: SUNY Press. pp. 251-268.
    This study asks after the fate of sophistry in the Eleatic Stranger's investigation of the best of the six regimes governed by law, and outlines as far as possible the role of the rhetor under the supervision of the true statesman, as well as the function and effects of myth on the citizens of the best regime. In short, I argue that Socrates' competitors do, in a qualified manner, still have a place in such a polis precisely where the work (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2016-12-12
    Method and Politics in Plato's Statesman.M. S. Lane - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Among Plato's works, the Statesman is usually seen as transitional between the Republic and the Laws. This book argues that the dialogue deserves a special place of its own. Whereas Plato is usually thought of as defending unchanging knowledge, Dr Lane demonstrates how, by placing change at the heart of political affairs, Plato reconceives the link between knowledge and authority. The statesman is shown to master the timing of affairs of state, and to use this expertise in managing the conflict (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. added 2016-12-11
    Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Political Thought.Michael S. Kochin - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Thought explores the relation between Plato's Republic and Laws on the set of issues that the Laws itself marks out as fundamental to the comparison: the unity of the virtues, the role of women, and the place of the family. Plato aims to persuade men to abandon the view of the good life that Greek cities and their laws inculcate as the only life worth living for those who would be real men and not effeminate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2016-12-08
    Platonic Reflections on the Aesthetic Dimensions of Deliberative Democracy.Christina Tarnopolsky - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (3):288-312.
    This essay utilizes Plato's insights into the role of shame in dialogical interactions to illuminate the aesthetic dimensions of deliberative democracy. Through a close analysis of the refutation of Polus in Plato's dialogue, the "Gorgias", I show how the emotion of shame is central to the unsettling, dynamic, and transformative character of democratic engagement and political judgment identified by recent aesthetic critics of Habermas' model of communicative action and democratic deliberation. Plato's analysis of shame offers a friendly amendment to these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. added 2016-12-08
    The Game of the Laws.Arthur J. Jacobson - 1999 - Political Theory 27 (6):769-788.
  29. added 2016-12-08
    Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. added 2016-12-08
    "Supposing Truth Were a Woman...": Plato's Subversion of Masculine Discourse.W. Brown - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (4):594-616.
    What is found at the historical beginnings of things is not the inviolable identity of their origin; it is the dissention of other things. It is diaparity. —Michel Foucault.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. added 2016-12-08
    Plato on Tyranny, Philosophy, and Pleasure.Martin A. Bertman - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (2):152 - 160.
  32. added 2016-12-08
    The Character of the Individual and the Character of the State, in Plato's Republic.Geoffrey Brown - 1983 - Apeiron 17 (1):43 - 47.
  33. added 2016-12-08
    Atlantis and Plato's Philosophy.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 1981 - Apeiron 15 (2):117 - 128.
    A moral orientation of a historically existing state is superior to an immoral one; but even a moral state or leader cannot be perfectly moral. The republic (or its symbol, ancient athens) is impossible for metaphysical and practical reasons, and it must suffer the same fate as atlantis in this story, i.e., Destruction at the hands of nature.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. added 2016-12-08
    Law and Justice in Plato's Crito.R. E. Allen - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (18):557.
  35. added 2016-12-08
    Legal Philosophy From Plato to Hegel.M. B. Crowe - 1968 - Philosophical Studies 17:291-292.
  36. added 2016-12-05
    Plato.Pablo García Castillo - 2010 - Philosophical Inquiry 32 (3-4):1-22.
    This paper's aim is to study the Greek simile of the ship of state, since it was born in the Lyric Poetry until its definitive drawing by Plato's hands. It describes the image of Paros' ship, by Archilochus, or the ship of city by Alcaeus and by Theognis. Analyzes how this image improves through the tragedies of Aeschylus and Sophocles, and their moral comprehension of it. And, at last, explains the excellence achieved as the central image on Plato's politic project.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2016-11-15
    The Political Significance of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave.Gabriel Zamosc - 2017 - Ideas Y Valores 66 (165):237-265.
    Abstract: In this paper I claim that Plato’s Cave is fundamentally a political, not an epistemological image, and that only by treating it as such can we appreciate correctly its relation to the images of the Sun and the Line. On the basis of textual evidence, I question the two main assumptions that support (in my view, mistakenly) the effort to find an epistemological parallel between the Cave and the Line: first, that the prisoners represent humankind in general, and, second, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. added 2016-10-17
    Plato and the Universality of Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - Themis Polska Nova 9 (2):5-25.
    An important argument in favour of recognising the cultural relativism and against universality of dignity and human rights, is the claim that the concept of dignity is a genuinely modern one. An analysis of a passage from the Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato devoted time to reflecting on the question of what determines the qualitative difference between certain beings (gods and human being) and the world of things, and what forms the basis for the special treatment of these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2016-03-04
    The Self, the Soul, and the Individual in the City of the Laws.Maria Michela Sassi - 2008 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxxv: Winter 2008. Oxford University Press. pp. 125.
    The ideal which Plato consistently endorses and develops in the Laws is one of a city which, like the ideal soul, is perfectly at peace with its inner conflicts. The law is presented as a remedy for the destabilizing influence of the sensations and emotions which make every human being an individual, before he is a citizen. The authoritarian aspect of this remedy may worry contemporary readers, but Plato supports it with his presupposition regarding the extreme weakness of human nature. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. added 2015-12-12
    The Interrogation of Meletus: Apology 24c4–28a1.Reid Smith Lynette - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):372-388.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. added 2015-11-17
    Persuasion, Falsehood, and Motivating Reason in Plato’s Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2).
    In Plato’s Laws, the Athenian Stranger maintains that law should consist of both persuasion (πειθώ) and compulsion (βία) (IV.711c, IV.718b-d, and IV.722b). Persuasion can be achieved by prefacing the laws with preludes (προοίμια), which make the citizens more eager to obey the laws. Although scholars disagree on how to interpret the preludes’ persuasion, they agree that the preludes instill true beliefs and give citizens good reasons for obeying the laws. In this paper I refine this account of the preludes by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. added 2015-09-09
    Understanding the Role of the Laws in Plato's "Statesman".Sandrine Berges - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (1):5-23.
    In the Statesman, Plato seems to be advocating that in the absence of a true king who will rule independently of laws, the next best thing as far as just rule is concerned is to ad here rigidly to existing laws, whatever they are. The rule of the true king is given as an example of virtuous rule in the sense that virtue politics or jurisprudence holds that laws cannot always deal justly with particular cases. But Plato’s view of what (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. added 2015-08-25
    Great Books, Bad Arguments: Republic, Leviathan, and The Communist Manifesto. By W. G. Runciman.John Preston - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (7):957-958.
  44. added 2015-05-01
    Athens Victorious: Democracy in Plato's Republic.Greg Recco - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Athens Victorious examines the notion of freedom in Plato's Republic, the proper understanding of which the author argues is essential for understanding the dialogue's ultimate political message. A close, thorough, and innovative analysis of the section of the dialogue in which various constitutional options are discussed leads to the surprising conclusion that the dialogue is advocating democracy, not some kind of totalitarian state.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. added 2015-04-30
    Plato: Moral and Political Ideals. By A. M. Adam. Pp. Vii + 159. Cambridge: University Press, 1913. Price 1s.G. B. R. - 1914 - The Classical Review 28 (05):177-.
  46. added 2015-04-28
    Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle.A. W. Price - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    This book explores for the first time an idea common to both Plato and Aristotle: although people are separate, their lives need not be; one person's life may overflow into another's, so that helping someone else is a way of serving oneself. Price considers how this idea unites the philosophers' treatments of love and friendship (which are otherwise very different), and demonstrates that this view of love and friendship, applied not only to personal relationships, but also to the household and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  47. added 2015-04-26
    La Physiologie Politique du Critias de Platon.J.-F. Pradeau - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (3):317-323.
  48. added 2015-04-25
    The Roots of Political Philosophy: Ten Forgotten Socratic Dialogues. Translated, with Interpretive Studies. Plato & Thomas L. Pangle (eds.) - 1987 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Opening an entirely new dimension of Platonic studies, this volume addresses major themes: the nature of law, property, and acquisitiveness; Socrates' famous "demonic voice"; the poetic claim to inspiration; and the psychology of the ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. added 2015-04-19
    Politics, Philosophy, Writing Plato's Art of Caring for Souls.Zdravko Planinc - 2001
  50. added 2015-04-17
    The Craft of Ruling in Plato's Euthydemus and Republic.Richard Parry - 2003 - Phronesis 48 (1):1 - 28.
    We will investigate the relation between the notion of the craft of ruling in the "Euthydemus" and in the "Republic". In the "Euthydemus", Socrates' search for an account of wisdom leads to his identifying it as the craft of ruling in the city. In the "Republic", the craft of ruling in the city is the virtue of wisdom in the city and the analogue of wisdom in the soul. Still, the craft of ruling leads to aporia in the former dialogue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 284