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Louis Sass [36]Louis A. Sass [29]Louis Arnorsson Sass [8]Louis D. Sass [2]
Louis Dewald Sass [1]
  1.  45
    Madness and modernism: insanity in the light of modern art, literature, and thought.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 1992 - Harvard University Press.
    Madness and Modernism provides a phenomenological study of schizophrenic disorders, criticizing some standard conceptions of these disorders. Sass argues that many aspects of this group of disorders can actually involve more sophisticated (albeit dysfunctional) forms of mind and experience.
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  2. Schizophrenia, consciousness, and the self.Louis A. Sass & Josef Parnas - 2003 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 29 (3):427-444.
    In recent years, there has been much focus on the apparent heterogeneity of schizophrenic symptoms. By contrast, this article proposes a unifying account emphasizing basic abnormalities of consciousness that underlie and also antecede a disparate assortment of signs and symptoms. Schizophrenia, we argue, is fundamentally a self-disorder or ipseity disturbance that is characterized by complementary distortions of the act of awareness: hyperreflexivity and diminished self-affection. Hyperreflexivity refers to forms of exaggerated self-consciousness in which aspects of oneself are experienced as akin (...)
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  3. Phenomenological Psychopathology and Schizophrenia: Contemporary Approaches and Misunderstandings.Louis Sass, Josef Parnas & Dan Zahavi - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):1–23.
    The phenomenological approach to schizophrenia has undergone something of a renaissance in Anglophone psychiatry in recent years. There has been a proliferation of works that focus on the nature of subjectivity in schizophrenia and related disorders, and that take inspiration from the work of such German and French philosophers as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty, and such classical psychiatrists as Minkowski, Blankenburg, and Binswanger (Rulf 2003; Sass 2001a, 2001b). This trend includes predominantly theoretical articles, which typically incorporate clinical material as well (...)
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  4. Self, solipsism, and schizophrenic delusions.Josef Parnas & Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):101-120.
    We propose that typical schizophrenic delusions develop on the background of preexisting anomalies of self-experience. We argue that disorders of the Self represent the experiential core clinical phenomena of schizophrenia, as was already suggested by the founders of the concept of schizophrenia and elaborated in the phenomenological psychiatric tradition. The article provides detailed descriptions of the pre-psychotic or schizotypal anomalies of self-experience, often illustrated through clinical vignettes. We argue that delusional transformation in the evolution of schizophrenic psychosis reflects a global (...)
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  5. Anomalous self-experience in depersonalization and schizophrenia: A comparative investigation.Louis Sass, Elizabeth Pienkos, Barnaby Nelson & Nick Medford - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):430-441.
    Various forms of anomalous self-experience can be seen as central to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. We examined similarities and differences between anomalous self-experiences common in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, as listed in the EASE , and those described in published accounts of severe depersonalization. Our aims were to consider anomalous self-experience in schizophrenia in a comparative context, to refine and enlarge upon existing descriptions of experiential disturbances in depersonalization, and to explore hypotheses concerning a possible core process in schizophrenia . Numerous (...)
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  6.  46
    Schizophrenia, self-experience, and the so-called "negative symptoms": Reflections on hyperreflexivity.Louis Sass - 2000 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Exploring the Self: Philosophical and Psychopathological Perspectives on Self-experience. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 149--82.
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  7. Self and World in Schizophrenia: Three Classic Approaches.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):251-270.
    This article presents an introductory overview of the interpretations of schizophrenia offered by three phenomenological psychiatrists: Eugene Minkowski (1885-1972), Wolfgang Blankenburg (b. 1928), and Kimura Bin (b. 1931). Minkowski views schizophrenia as characterized by a diminished sense of dynamic and vital connection to the world ("loss of vital contact"), often accompanied by a hypertrophy of intellectual and static tendencies ("morbid rationalism," "morbid geometrism"). Blankenburg emphasizes the patient's loss of the normal sense of obviousness or "natural self-evidence"—a loss of the usual (...)
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  8. Space, Time, and Atmosphere A Comparative Phenomenology of Melancholia, Mania, and Schizophrenia, Part II.Louis Sass & E. Pienkos - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):131-152.
    This paper offers a comparative study of abnormalities in the experience of space, time, and general atmosphere in three psychiatric conditions: schizophrenia, melancholia, and mania. It is a companion piece to our previous article entitled 'Varieties of Self- Experience'; here we focus on experiences of the world rather than of the self. As before, we are especially interested in similarities but also in some subtle distinctions in the forms of subjectivity associated with these three conditions. As before, we survey phenomenologicallyoriented (...)
     
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  9. The structure of self-consciousness in schizophrenia.Josef Parnas & Louis Sass - 2011 - In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines the structure of self-consciousness in people with schizophrenia. The findings indicate that our self-experience is not neutral with respect to the metaphysical status of the self and that it is important to attend carefully to the experience of the subject in order to understand schizophrenia. The results also suggest that the variable disruptions in the sense of self-presence, first-person perspective, and the phenomenality of experience in schizophrenics directly affect the minimal self and it may also have implications (...)
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  10.  56
    The Phenomenology of Anomalous World Experience in Schizophrenia: A Qualitative Study.Elizabeth Pienkos, Steven Silverstein & Louis Sass - 2017 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 48 (2):188-213.
    This current study is a pilot project designed to clarify changes in the lived world among people with diagnoses within the schizophrenia spectrum. The Examination of Anomalous World Experience was used to interview ten participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and a comparison group of three participants with major depressive disorder. Interviews were analyzed using the descriptive phenomenological method. This analysis revealed two complementary forms of experience unique toszparticipants: Destabilization, the experience that reality and the intersubjective world are less comprehensible, less (...)
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  11.  50
    Expressing experience: the promise and perils of the phenomenological interview.Elizabeth Pienkos, Borut Škodlar & Louis Sass - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (1):53-71.
    This paper outlines several of the challenges that are inherent in any attempt to communicate subjective experience to others, particularly in the context of a clinical interview. It presents the phenomenological interview as a way of effectively responding to these challenges, which may be especially important when attempting to understand the profound experiential transformations that take place in schizophrenia. Features of language experience in schizophrenia—including changes in interpersonal orientation, a sense of the arbitrariness of language, and a desire for faithful (...)
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  12. Some Reflections on the (Analytic) Philosophical Approach to Delusion.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):71-80.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 11.1 (2004) 71-80 [Access article in PDF] Some Reflections on the (Analytic) Philosophical Approach to Delusion Louis A. Sass There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." —Hamlet, Act I, Scene 5 The peculiar, often problematic phenome na of psychopathology have been attract ing the attention of analytic philosophers in recent years. The topic of delusion has (...)
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  13. Anomalous experience of self and world: Administration of EASE and EAWE scales to four subjects with schizophrenia.Jérôme Englebert, François Monville, Caroline Valentiny, Françoise Mossay, Elizabeth Pienkos & Louis Sass - forthcoming - Psychopathology.
    The aim of this paper is to study anomalies of self- and world-experience in schizophrenia from a phenomenological perspective, through the use of the EASE and the EAWE interviews. Four patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia were interviewed with both EASE and EAWE. A qualitative analysis of these interviews was carried out on all the data; quantitative scores were also assigned based on the frequency and intensity of items endorsed by the subjects. For the EASE, subjects endorsed an average frequency of (...)
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  14. Incomprehensibility and Understanding: On the Interpretation of Severe Mental Illness.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):125-132.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 10.2 (2003) 125-132 [Access article in PDF] Incomprehensibility and Understanding:On the Interpretation of Severe Mental Illness Louis A. Sass Keywords hermeneutics, psychopathology, paradox, Wittgenstein, solipsism, delusion, principle of charity, phenomenological psychopathology. I would like to begin by thanking Rupert Read for the care he has put into reading my work, and into thinking through its implications in the context of the "new-Wittgensteinian" interpretation of the (...)
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  15.  48
    Varieties of self-experience: a comparative phenomenology of melancholia, mania, and schizophrenia, Part I.Louis Sass - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    This paper provides a critical survey of some subtle and often overlooked disturbances of self-experience that can occur in schizophrenia, melancholia, and mania. The goal is to better understand both similarities and differences between these conditions. We present classical and contemporary studies, mostly from the phenomenological tradition, and illustrate these with patient reports. Experiential changes in five domains of selfhood are considered: Cognition, Self-Awareness, Bodily Experiences, Demarcation/Transitivism, and Existential Reorientation. We discuss: I. major differences involving self-experience between schizophrenia and affective (...)
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  16. Phenomenology of self-disturbances in schizophrenia: Some research findings and directions.Louis Arnorsson Sass & Josef Parnas - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):347-356.
    Phenomenological psychiatry has suffered from a failure to translate its insights into terms specific enough to be applied to psychiatric diagnosis or to be used in contemporary research programs. This difficulty can be understood in light of the well-known tradeoff between reliability and validity. We argue, however, that with sufficient ingenuity, phenomenological concepts can be adapted and applied in a research context. Elsewhere, we have described a phenomenologically oriented conception of schizophrenia as a self- or ipseity-disorder with two main facets: (...)
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  17.  84
    Affectivity in schizophrenia: A phenomenological view.Louis A. Sass - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):127-147.
    Schizophrenia involves profound but enigmatic disturbances of affective or emotional life. The affective responses as well as expression of many patients in the schizophrenia spectrum can seem odd, incongruent, inadequate, or otherwise off-the-mark. Such patients are, in fact, often described in rather contradictory terms: as being prone both to exaggerated and to diminished levels of emotional or affective response. According to Ernst Kretschmer, they actually tend to have both kinds of experience at the same time. This paper attempts to explain (...)
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  18. Heidegger, schizophrenia and the ontological difference.Louis A. Sass - 1992 - Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):109 – 132.
    This paper offers a phenomenological or hermeneutic reading—employing Heidegger's notion of the 'ontological difference'—of certain central aspects of schizophrenic experience. The main focus is on signs and symptoms that have traditionally been taken to indicate either 'poor reality-testing' or else 'poverty of content of speech' (defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III-R as: “speech that is adequate in amount but conveys little information because of vagueness, empty repetitions, or use of stereotyped or obscure phrases"). I argue (...)
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  19.  47
    Faces of Intersubjectivity.Louis Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2015 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 46 (1):1-32.
    Here we consider interpersonal experience in schizophrenia, melancholia, and mania. Our goal is to improve understanding of similarities and differences in how other people can be experienced in these disorders, through a review of first-person accounts and case examples and of contemporary and classic literature on the phenomenology of these disorders. We adopt a tripartite/dialectical structure: first we explore main differences as traditionally described; next we consider how the disorders may resemble each other; finally we discuss more subtle but perhaps (...)
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  20. Phenomenology and Psychopathology.Josef Parnas, Louis Sass & Dan Zahavi - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):37-39.
    In this response to Wiggins and Schwartz, Ratcliffe, and Stanghellini, we first wish to express our gratitude to Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology for providing us the space to clarify our views and to overcome certain misunderstandings. Ratcliffe notes that our critique is "harsh," whereas Wiggins and Schwartz lament the fact that the debate "has taken the form of sometimes acid formulations and rejoinders . . . that lack the tone of mutual appreciation" (2011, 31). We deplore the fact that this (...)
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  21. Delusion: The Phenomenological Approach.Louis A. Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard G. T. Gipps, George Graham, John Z. Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 632–657.
     
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  22.  41
    Schizophrenia, self-consciousness, and the modern mind.Louis A. Sass - 1998 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (5-6):5-6.
    This paper uses certain of Michel Foucault's ideas concerning modern consciousness (from The Order of Things) to illuminate a central paradox of the schizophrenic condition: a strange oscillation, or even coexistence, between two opposite experiences of the self: between the loss or fragmentation of self and its apotheosis in moments of solipsistic grandeur. Many schizophrenic patients lose their sense of integrated and active intentionality; even their most intimate thoughts and inclinations may be experienced as emanating from, or under the control (...)
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  23. Delusions and double book-keeping.Louis A. Sass - 2013 - In Thomas Fuchs, Thiemo Breyer & Christoph Mundt (eds.), Karl Jaspers’ Philosophy and Psychopathology. New York: Springer. pp. 125–147.
     
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  24. The Truth-Taking-Stare: A Heideggerian Interpretation of a Schizophrenic World.Louis A. Sass - 1990 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 21 (2):121-149.
  25.  85
    Varieties of "phenomenology" : on description, understanding, and explanation in psychiatry.Josef Parnas & Louis A. Sass - 2008 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 239.
  26.  69
    A New History of Ourselves, in the Shadow of our Obsessions and Compulsions.Pierre-Henri Castel, Angela Verdier & Louis Sass - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (4):299-309.
    Before broaching our main subject, and exploring why, among all disorders of the mind, obsessive-compulsive disorders have a place apart, I would like to start from a dilemma that is well-known to historians interested in mental disorders. According to one approach, a mental illness X is considered as a bona fide or ‘genuine’ illness if, and only if, it originates from a disturbance of the brain. Its neurobiological form is in this case considered as invariant, whatever cultural veneer might give (...)
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  27.  70
    Self-disturbance in schizophrenia: hyperreflexivity and diminished self-affection.Louis A. Sass - 2003 - In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. pp. 870539117.
  28.  28
    Contradictions of emotion in schizophrenia.Louis Sass - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (2):351-390.
    This paper considers contradictory features of emotional or affective experience and expression in schizophrenia in light of the “Kretschmerian paradox”—the fact that schizophrenia-spectrum patients can simultaneously experience both exaggerated and diminished levels of affective response. An attempt is made to explain the paradox and explore its implications. Recent research on emotion in schizophrenia is reviewed, including subjective reports, psychophysiological measures of arousal or activation, and behavioural measures, focusing on flat-affect and negative-symptom patients. After discussing relevant concepts and vocabulary of emotion (...)
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  29. Uncovering the realities of delusional experience in schizophrenia: a qualitative phenomenological study in Belgium.Jasper Feyaerts, Wouter Kusters, Zeno Van Duppen, Stijn Vanheule, Inez Myin-Germeys & Louis Sass - 2021 - Lancet Psychiatry 8 (9):784-796.
    BACKGROUND: Delusions in schizophrenia are commonly approached as empirical false beliefs about everyday reality. Phenomenological accounts, by contrast, have suggested that delusions are more adequately understood as pertaining to a different kind of reality experience. How this alteration of reality experience should be characterised, which dimensions of experiential life are involved, and whether delusional reality might differ from standard reality in various ways is unclear and little is known about how patients with delusions value and relate to these experiential alterations. (...)
     
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  30.  15
    Everywhere and Nowhere: Reflections on Phenomenology as Impossible and Indispensable.Louis Sass - 2021 - Critical Inquiry 47 (3):544-564.
    This essay argues for the necessity of a phenomenological perspective on mind and mental disorder while also emphasizing the inherent difficulty of adopting such an orientation. Here I adopt a via negativa approach—by considering three forms of error that the phenomenologists Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty recognize as needing to be guarded against, lest they subvert the project of attaining an adequate understanding of consciousness or subjectivity: namely (1) prejudices deriving from theory and common sense, (2) distorting effects (...)
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  31.  71
    Lacan, Foucault, and the 'Crisis of the Subject': Revisionist Reflections on Phenomenology and Post-structuralism.Louis Sass - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (4):325-341.
    French thought in the twentieth century is typically described as marked by a major fault line, a rupture or grande coupure, that emerged in the 1960s, the heyday of the ‘crisis of the subject.’ Before this time French philosophy, together with associated fields, were focused on issues of subjectivity—first in the vein of Bergsonian vitalism but then shifting, with Sartre and Merleau-Ponty in the late 1930s and 1940s, to forms of phenomenology and existentialism inspired first by Husserl and then, even (...)
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  32.  14
    Schizophrenia: A disturbance of the thematic field.Louis A. Sass - 2004 - In Lester Embree (ed.), Gurwitsch's Relevancy for Cognitive Science. Springer. pp. 59--78.
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  33.  28
    Schreber's Panopticism: Psychosis and the Modern Soul.Louis Sass - 1987 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 54.
  34.  65
    Lacan: the mind of the modernist.Louis A. Sass - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (4):409-443.
    This paper offers an intellectual portrait of the French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, by considering his incorporation of perspectives associated with “modernism,” the artistic and intellectual avant-garde of the first half of the twentieth century. These perspectives are largely absent in other alternatives in psychology, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis. Emphasis is placed on Lacan’s affinities with phenomenology, a tradition he criticized and to which he is often seen as opposed. Two general issues are discussed. The first is Lacan’s unparalleled appreciation of the (...)
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  35.  30
    Recent French Thought at the Intersection of Culture, Subjectivity, and Psychopathology.Louis Sass - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (4):279-284.
    French thought no longer enjoys the kind of prominence in the Anglophone world that it did in most of the last half of the twentieth century, a time when Sartre and Camus, then Lévi-Strauss, Foucault, and Derrida exercised a decisive influence on innovative work in literary and cultural theory, the human and social sciences, and on social thought more generally. It would be a mistake, however, to exaggerate the degree to which this represents either a decline in the actual influence (...)
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  36.  53
    IntrospectionIntrospection and schizophrenia: A comparative investigation of anomalous self experiences.Louis Sass, Elizabeth Pienkos & Barnaby Nelson - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):853-867.
    This paper offers a comparative investigation of anomalous self-experiences common in schizophrenia instrument) and those of normal individuals in an intensely introspective orientation. The latter represent a relatively pure manifestation of certain forms of exaggerated self-consciousness, one facet of the disturbance of core- or minimal-self postulated as central in schizophrenia. Significant similarities with schizophrenia-like experience were found but important differences also emerged. Affinities included feelings of passivity, fading of self or world, and alienation from thoughts, feelings, or lived-body. Differences involved (...)
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  37.  8
    Self-disorders in schizophrenia as disorders of transparency: an exploratory account.Jasper Feyaerts, Barnaby Nelson & Louis Sass - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    Understanding alterations of selfhood (termed self-disorders or self-disturbances) that are considered typical of the schizophrenia-spectrum is a central focus of phenomenological research. The currently most influential way of phenomenologically conceiving self-disorders in schizophrenia is as disorders of the so-called most basic or “minimal self”. In this paper, we first highlight some challenges for the minimal self-view of self-disorders, focusing on (1) problems arising from the supposedly “essential” or “universal” nature of minimal self with respect to phenomenal awareness and (2) the (...)
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  38.  93
    "My So-Called Delusions": Solipsism, Madness, and the Schreber Case.Louis A. Sass - 1994 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 25 (1):70-103.
    This paper offers a critique of a central psychopathological concept, the notion of "poor reality-testing. "Using ideas from the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, I consider the nature of delusions in schizophrenia, largely through examining Daniel Paul Schreber's famous Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. Many schizophrenic individuals do not in fact mistake their fantasies for reality, as is traditionally assumed. Rather, I argue, they engage in a solipsistic mode of experience, a felt subjectivization of the lived world that is associated with a (...)
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  39. Phenomenology, context, and self-experience in schizophrenia.Louis A. Sass & Peter J. Uhlhaas - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):104-105.
    Impairments in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia are supported by phenomenological data that suggest deficits in the processing of visual context. Although the target article is sympathetic to such a phenomenological perspective, we argue that the relevance of phenomenological data for a wider understanding of consciousness in schizophrenia is not sufficiently addressed by the authors.
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  40.  60
    More Aristotle, Less DSM: The Ontology of Mental Disorders in Constructivist Perspective.Marino Pérez-Álvarez, Louis A. Sass & José M. García-Montes - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):211-225.
    This work begins by proposing the need for exploring the mode of being of mental disorders. It is a philosophical study in an Aristotelian perspective, with special emphasis on the anthropological–cultural dimension. It is difficult for such an inquiry to be carried out from within psychiatry or clinical psychology, committed as these fields are to their own logic and practical conditions. The issues are, in any case, more ontological than strictly clinical in nature. We therefore turn to Aristotle, and specifically (...)
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  41.  64
    “Robbed of my life”: The Felt Loss of Familiar and Engaged Presence in Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.Elizabeth Pienkos & Louis Sass - 2022 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 53 (1):51-81.
    Depersonalization/derealization disorder is classified as a dissociative disorder in the DSM5. It is noteworthy that the symptoms of depersonalization and derealization are commonly found in many other psychological disorders, including schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while phenomenological features of schizophrenia are commonly found in DPDR. The current study attempts to clarify these apparent similarities via highly detailed phenomenological interviews with four persons diagnosed with DPDR. The data revealed four interrelated facets: 1, Loss of resonance, 2, Detachment from experience, 3, Loss of self, (...)
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  42.  11
    The Self and Its Vicissitudes: An "Archaeological" Study of the Psychoanalytic Avant-Garde.Louis Sass - 1988 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 55.
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  43. Delusions and double book-keeping.Louis A. Sass - 2013 - In Thomas Fuchs, Thiemo Breyer & Christoph Mundt (eds.), Karl Jaspers’ Philosophy and Psychopathology. New York: Springer. pp. 125–147.
     
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  44.  62
    Madness and Melancholia.Louis A. Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):161-164.
    It is a Pleasure to comment on Somogy Varga’s intriguing paper, which offers welcome insight into the historical sources, changing uses, and underlying assumptions pertaining to the concept of ‘melancholia,’ especially in relationship to ‘depression.’ We found Varga’s discussion of the relationship between affect and cognition in past discussions of melancholia and depression to be illuminating, especially given the emphasis on cognitive distortions in contemporary psycho-pathology. His explanation of the gradual evolution of the depression concept from melancholia sheds interesting light (...)
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  45. Civilized madness: schizophrenia, self-consciousness and the modern mind.Louis A. Sass - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (2):83-120.
  46.  50
    Husserl, Heidegger, and the paradox of subjectivity.Louis Sass - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (3):295-317.
    This article considers the differences between Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger in light of Pascal’s distinction between the esprit de géometrie and the esprit de finesse. According to Pascal, the essential “principles” dominating our perceptual lives cannot be clearly and confidently demonstrated in a manner akin to logic and mathematics, but must be discerned in a more spontaneous or intuitive manner.It is unsurprising that Husserl, originally a student of mathematics, might seem closer to the esprit de géometrie, whereas Heidegger, trained (...)
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  47.  53
    Delusion, Reality, and Excentricity: Comment on Thomas Fuchs.Louis A. Sass - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):81-83.
    In "Delusion, Reality, and Intersubjectivity," Thomas Fuchs offers a superb presentation of an enactive/phenomenological approach to schizophrenic delusions—an approach that is clearly superior to the poor-reality-testing formula that has dominated thinking about delusion in psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and cognitive-behavioral theory. As he convincingly argues, two key tendencies go a long way toward accounting for the distinctive features of delusion in schizophrenia: 1) withdrawal from practical, sensori-motoric interaction with the physical environment; and 2) failure to experience reality in intersubjective terms—as a realm (...)
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  48.  6
    The Land of Unreality: On the Phenomenology of the Schizophrenic Break.Louis A. Sass - 1988 - New Ideas in Psychology 6 (2):223–242.
    This study in comparative phenomenology offers a description of the lived-world of the Stimmung, an experience especially characteristic of early stages of schizophrenia. In this state, the patient will stare transfixed at an alienated perceptual world that may have one or more of several anomalous characteristics. The world may seem strangely unreal; objects may seem fragmented, or devoid of standard pragmatic meanings and manifesting instead their sheer existence; or objects and events may seem imbued with a tantalizing but ineffable quality (...)
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  49. From the Visions of Saint Teresa of Jesus to the Voices of Schizophrenia.Adolfo J. Cangas, Louis A. Sass & Marino Pérez-Álvarez - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):239-250.
    The life of Saint Teresa of Jesus, the most famous mystic of sixteenth-century Spain, was characterized by recurrent visions and states of ecstasy. In this paper, we examine social components related to Teresa’s personal crises and the historical conditions of her times, factors that must be taken into account to understand these unusual forms of experience and behavior. Many of these factors (e.g., increasing individualism and reflexivity) are precursors of the condition of modern times. Indeed, certain parallels can be observed (...)
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  50.  21
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Sheree Dukes Conrad, Louis A. Sass, Ivana Guglietti-Kelly, Malcolm R. Westcott, Bernd Jager, David L. Smith & Amedeo Giorgi - 1990 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 21 (2):150-164.
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