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  1. added 2019-02-12
    The Epistemic Innocence of Clinical Memory Distortions.Lisa Bortolotti & Ema Sullivan‐Bissett - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (3):263-279.
    In some neuropsychological disorders memory distortions seemingly fill gaps in people’s knowledge about their past, where people’s self-image, history, and prospects are often enhanced. False beliefs about the past compromise both people’s capacity to construct a reliable autobiography and their trustworthiness as communicators. However, such beliefs contribute to people’s sense of competence and self-confidence, increasing psychological wellbeing. Here we consider both psychological benefits and epistemic costs, and argue that distorting the past is likely to also have epistemic benefits that cannot (...)
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  2. added 2018-08-08
    When Caring Is Just and Justice is Caring: Justice and Mental Retardation.Eva Feder Kittay - 2001 - Public Culture 13 (3):557-580.
    Among the various human forms alluded to in the Hebrew prayer, mental retardation appears to be one of the most difficult to celebrate. It is the disability that other disabled persons do not want attributed to them. It is the disability for which prospective parents are most likely to use selective abortion (Wertz 2000). And it is the disability that prompted one of the most illustrious United States Supreme Court Justices to endorse forced sterilization, because "three generations of imbeciles are (...)
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  3. added 2017-09-07
    Intrusive Uncertainty in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.Tom Cochrane & Keeley Heaton - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (2):182-208.
    In this article we examine obsessive compulsive disorder. We examine and reject two existing models of this disorder: the Dysfunctional Belief Model and the Inference-Based Approach. Instead, we propose that the main distinctive characteristic of OCD is a hyperactive sub-personal signal of being in error, experienced by the individual as uncertainty about his or her intentional actions. This signalling interacts with the anxiety sensitivities of the individual to trigger conscious checking processes, including speculations about possible harms. We examine the implications (...)
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  4. added 2017-02-11
    Catatonia is the Rosetta Stone of Psychosis.T. Carroll Brendan & D. Carroll Tressa - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):759-760.
    Recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) represent a form of psychosis. It may be useful to compare RCVH to another form of psychosis, catatonia. Both include a long list of medical illnesses and have been examined using several different hypotheses. Catatonia has a variety of hypotheses, including neurocircuitry, neurochemistry, and an integrated neuropsychiatric hypothesis. This hypothesis for catatonia supports Collerton et al.'s Perception and Attention Deficit model (PAD) for RCVH.
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  5. added 2017-02-08
    Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Akinetic Catatonia and After Remission.S. Goldman - unknown
    K L Kahlbaum published in 1874 the first recorded description of catatonia. Akinetic catatonia is now defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome principally characterised by akinesia, mutism, stupor, and catalepsy. 1 Even if some advances have been made in the recognition of catatonia, in particular by the development of different rating scales, 1 the pathophysiology of this syndrome is not clearly established. A right handed 14 year old girl presented with akinetic catatonia during an episode of depression in the context of (...)
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  6. added 2017-02-02
    Does Catatonia Have a Specific Brain Biology?Bernhard Bogerts - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):580-581.
    Dr. Northoff's comprehensive comparison of clinical symptoms and neurobiological findings in catatonia with that of Parkinson's disease through integration of various levels of investigation, from neurochemistry up to the subjective experience, is a good example of the new strategies we need to improve our understanding of psychiatric disorders. His multimodal approach, leading to the hypothesis that different pathophysiologies of transcortical “horizontal modulation” and “bottom-up/top-down” – orbitofrontal/basal ganglia – “vertical modulations,” may explain many clinical aspects of catatonia and Parkinson's disease, and (...)
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  7. added 2017-01-19
    Catatonia Isn't Ready for a Unified Theory.Carrie E. Bearden & John R. Monterosso - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):579-580.
    Northoff's target article presents a unifying theory of the pathophysiology of catatonia, as compared to Parkinson's disease. We address two arguments in particular that do not appear justified by available evidence: (1) The physiological basis of catatonia is the breakdown of right hemisphere prefrontal-parietal cortical connectivity, and (2) Dysfunction in this system results in specific deficits in termination of action.
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  8. added 2016-12-08
    De-Medicalizing Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition.Mark Rapley, Joanna Moncrieff & Jacqui Dillon (eds.) - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Notes on Contributors -- Preface; R.Dallos -- Carving Nature at its Joints? DSM and the Medicalization of Everyday Life; M.Rapley, J.Moncrieff&J.Dillon -- Dualisms and the Myth of Mental Illness; P.Thomas&P.Bracken -- Making the World Go Away, and How Psychology and Psychiatry Benefit; M.Boyle -- Cultural Diversity and Racism: An Historical Perspective; S.Fernando -- The Social Context of Paranoia; D.J.Harper -- From 'Bad Character' to BPD: The Medicalization of 'Personality Disorder'; J.Bourne -- Medicalizing Masculinity; S.Timimi -- (...)
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  9. added 2016-12-08
    Psychopaths and Moral Knowledge.Vargas Manuel & Nichols Shaun - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):157-162.
    Neil Levy (2007) argues that empirical data shows that psychopaths lack the moral knowledge required for moral responsibility. His account is intriguing, and it offers a promising way to think about the significance of psychopaths for work on moral responsibility. In what follows we focus on three lines of concern connected to Levy's account: his interpretation of the data, the scope of exculpation, and the significance of biological explanations for anti-social behavior.
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  10. added 2016-12-08
    Resolving Repression.M. Smith Steven - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):534-535.
    The feuding factions of the memory wars, that is, those concerned with the validity of recovered memories versus those concerned with false memories, are unified by Erdelyi's theory of repression. Evidence shows suppression, inhibition, and retrieval blocking can have profound yet reversible effects on a memory's accessibility, and deserve as prominent a role in the recovered memory debate as evidence of false memories. Erdelyi's theory shows that both inhibitory and elaborative processes cooperate to keep unwanted memories out of consciousness.
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  11. added 2016-12-08
    Perception and Psychoses: The Role of Glutamatergic Transmission Within the Nucleus Accumbens Septi.Pascual Angel Gargiulo & Adriana Ines Landa de Gargiulo - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):792-793.
    In agreement with Behrendt & Young (B&Y), we considered the role of perception disturbances in schizophrenia in our first clinical approaches, using the Bender test with schizophrenic patients. Following this, we reproduced nuclear symptoms of schizophrenia in animal models, showing that perceptual disturbances, acquisition disturbances, and decrease in affective levels can be induced by glutamatergic blockade within the nucleus accumbens septi. Our results link the proposed corticostriatal dysfunction with the thalamocortical disturbances underlying perceptual problems reviewed by B&Y.
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  12. added 2016-12-08
    Folk Psychological Narratives and the Case of Autism.Daniel D. Hutto - 2003 - Philosophical Papers 32 (3):345-361.
    This paper builds on the insights of Jerome Bruner by underlining the central importance of narratives explaining actions in terms of reasons, arguing that by giving due attention to the central roles that they play in our everyday understanding of others provides a better way of explicating the nature and source of that activity than does simulation theory, theory-theory or some union of the two. However, although I promote Bruner's basic claims about the roles narratives play in this everyday enterprise, (...)
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  13. added 2016-11-04
    Causes and Correlates of Intrusive Memory: A Response to Clark, MacKay, Holmes and Bourne.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Psychological Medicine 46 (15):3255-3258.
  14. added 2016-01-24
    From Being Unaccountable to Suffering From Severe Mental Disorder and (Possibly) Back Once Again to Being Unaccountable.Christer Svennerlind - 2015 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 8 (2):45-58.
    From 1965, the Swedish penal law does not require accountability as a condition for criminal responsibility. Instead, severely mentally disordered offenders are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care. The process that led to the present legislation had its origins in a critique of the concept of accountability that was first launched 50 years earlier by the founding father of Swedish forensic psychiatry, Olof Kinberg. The concept severe mental disorder is part of the Criminal Code as well as the Compulsory Mental Act. (...)
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  15. added 2015-02-08
    Capgras Syndrome: A Novel Probe for Understanding the Neural Representation of the Identity and Familiarity of Persons.William Hirstein & V. S. Ramachandran - 1997 - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 264:437-444.
  16. added 2014-08-06
    Making Sense of Spousal Revenge Filicide.Glenn Carruthers - forthcoming - Aggression and Violent Behavior.
    “Spousal revenge” killers murder their child apparently out of a desire to cause harm to their ex-partner, the child’s other parent. Standard explanations of these killings fail to provide an adequate solution to what I call the problem of spousal revenge filicide. This is the problem of how a killer comes to take their rage at their former partner out on their own child and how that child can be dehumanized to the point of murder. Although the dehumanization of the (...)
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  17. added 2014-08-04
    Enhancing Autonomy by Reducing Impulsivity: The Case of ADHD.Jonathan Pugh - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):373-375.
    In a recent article in this journal, Schaefer et al. argue that it might be possible to enhance autonomy through the use of cognitive enhancements. In this article, I highlight an example that Schaefer et al. do not acknowledge of a way in which we already seem to be using pharmacological agents in a manner that can be understood as enhancing an agent’s autonomy. To make this argument, I begin by following other theorists in the philosophical literature in claiming that (...)
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  18. added 2014-08-04
    A Bio-Social and Ethical Framework for Understanding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.Carla Meurk, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):337-344.
    The diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders is embedded in a matrix of biological, social and ethical processes, making it an important topic for crossdisciplinary social and ethical research. This article reviews different branches of research relevant to understanding how FASD is identified and defined and outlines a framework for future social and ethical research in this area. We outline the character of scientific research into FASD, epidemiological discrepancies between reported patterns of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the incidence (...)
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  19. added 2014-04-03
    How Can I Remember When "I" Wasn′T There: Long-Term Retention of Traumatic Experiences and Emergence of the Cognitive Self.Mark L. Howe, Mary L. Courage & Carole Peterson - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):327-355.
    In this article, we focus on two issues, namely, the nature and onset of very early personal memories, especially for traumatic events, and the role of stress in long-term retention. We begin by outlining a theory of early autobiographical memory, one whose unfolding is coincident with emergence of the cognitive self. It is argued that it is not until this self emerges that personal memories will remain viable over extended periods of time. We illustrate this with 25 cases of young (...)
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  20. added 2014-04-03
    Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma.Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.
    Clinical experience suggests that adult survivors of childhood trauma arrive at their memories in a number of ways, with varying degrees of associated distress and uncertainty and, in some cases, after memory lapses of varying duration and extent. Among those patients who enter psychotherapy as a result of early abuse, three general patterns of traumatic recall are identified: relatively continuous and complete recall of childhood abuse experiences coupled with changing interpretations of these experiences, partial amnesia for abuse events, accompanied by (...)
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  21. added 2014-04-02
    Traumatic Memories: Do We Need to Invoke Special Mechanisms?Helene Hembrooke & Stephen J. Ceci - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):75-82.
  22. added 2014-04-02
    The Forgotten Difference: Ordinary Memory Versus Traumatic Memory.Charles L. Whitfield - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):88-94.
  23. added 2014-04-02
    Empirical Psychology and the Repressed Memory Debate: Current Status and Future Directions.Maria S. Zaragoza & Karen J. Mitchell - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):116-119.
  24. added 2014-04-01
    Investigating Fame Judgments: On the Generality of Hypotheses, Conclusions, and Measurement Models.Axel Buchner & Werner Wippich - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):226-231.
    In this article, we try to clarify some of the issues raised by S. C. Draine, A. G. Greenwald, and M. R. Banaji concerning our investigation into the gender bias in fame judgments . First, we did not test the general hypothesis and did not draw the general conclusion that Drain et al. suggest we did. Second, we did not reject M. R. Banaji and A. G. Greenwald's assumptions about the familiarity of male and female names in the fame judgment (...)
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  25. added 2014-04-01
    Korsakoff and Amnesia.William P. Banks - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):22-26.
  26. added 2014-04-01
    On Assumptions of, Relations Between, and Evaluations of Some Process Dissociation Measurement Models.Axel Buchner & Edgar Erdfelder - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):581-594.
    In this article, we analyze both M. J. Wainwright and E. M. Reingold's view of the process dissociation measurement models presented by A. Buchner, E. Erdfelder, and B. Vaterrodt-Plunnecke and their suggestions on that topic. This analysis reveals a number of problems in Wainwright and Reingold's approach. Some of these problems are more subtle than others, but they are nevertheless consequential. Thus, researchers working with the process dissociation procedure should be aware of these problems.
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  27. added 2014-04-01
    Medico-Psychological Study of a Memory Disorder.S. S. Korsakoff - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):2-21.
  28. added 2014-04-01
    Repression in the Child's Conception of the World: A Phenomenological Reading of Piaget.Michael P. Sipiora - 1993 - Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):167 – 180.
    The present article undertakes a psychological reading of The Child's Conception of the World as a cultural artifact in which genetic psychology's naturalistic and positivistic assumptions reflect an Enlightenment model of science, and Piaget figures as an agent of technological rationality. A phenomenological analysis of the text reveals how Piaget's research engages in an active repression of specific dimensions of childhood experience. Young children's 'adualistic' conceptions of thought, self and language are deemed 'confused', and thereby discounted, by virtue of the (...)
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  29. added 2014-03-30
    “Are False Memories Permanent?”: An Investigation of the Long-Term Effects of Source Misattributions.Mary Lyn Huffman, Angela M. Crossman & Stephen J. Ceci - 1997 - Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):482-490.
    With growing concerns over children's suggestibility and how it may impact their reliability as witnesses, there is increasing interest in determining the long-term effects of induced memories. The goal of the present research was to learn whether source misattributions found by Ceci, Huffman, Smith, and Loftus caused permanent memory alterations in the subjects tested. When 22 children from the original study were reinterviewed 2 years later, they recalled 77% of all true events. However, they only consented to 13% of all (...)
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  30. added 2014-03-29
    How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes": Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist.Nomy Arpaly - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
    Many psychiatrists tell their clients that any mental disorder is ‘‘a disease, just like diabetes’’. This slogan appears to suggest that mental states and behavior that are classified ‘‘mental disorders’’ are somehow radically different from other mental states and behaviors—both when it comes to simply understanding people and when it comes to moral assessments of mental states and of actions. After all, mental illness is just like diabetes, while other human conditions are not. That sounds like a huge difference. I (...)
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  31. added 2014-03-27
    Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory.Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas De Block (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Maladapting Minds discusses a number of reasons why philosophers of psychiatry should take an interest in evolutionary explanations of mental disorders and, more generally, in evolutionary thinking. First of all, there is the nascent field of evolutionary psychiatry. Unlike other psychiatrists, evolutionary psychiatrists engage with ultimate, rather than proximate, questions about mental illnesses. Being a young and youthful new discipline, evolutionary psychiatry allows for a nice case study in the philosophy of science. Secondly, philosophers of psychiatry have engaged with evolutionary (...)
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  32. added 2014-03-27
    Developmental Disorders and Cognitive Architecture.Edouard Machery - 2011 - In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press.
    For the last thirty years, cognitive scientists have attempted to describe the cognitive architecture of typically developing human beings, using, among other sources of evidence, the dissociations that result from developmental psychopathologies such as autism spectrum disorders, Williams syndrome, and Down syndrome. Thus, in his recent defense of the massive modularity hypothesis, Steven Pinker insists on the importance of such dissociations to identify the components of the typical cognitive architecture (2005, 4; my emphasis): This kind of faculty psychology has numerous (...)
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  33. added 2014-03-26
    William James's The Fringe of Consciousness REM Mentation in Narcoleptics and Normals.Roar Fosse - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):514-515.
    Erratum: Volume 9, Number 4 , in the article “William James's The Fringe of Consciousness REM Mentation in Narcoleptics and Normals: Reply to Tore Nielsen,” by Roar Fosse, pages 514–515 ()On page 514, the title is incorrect as printed. The title should read “REM Mentation in Narcoleptics and Normals: Reply to Tore Nielsen.” “William James's The Fringe of Consciousness” should be a heading following this article in the Table of Contents and pertains to the articles that follow. Both the Fosse (...)
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  34. added 2014-03-23
    Nativism and Neuroconstructivism in the Explanation of Williams Syndrome.Philip Gerrans - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):41-52.
    Nativists about syntactic processing have argued that linguisticprocessing, understood as the implementation of a rule-basedcomputational architecture, is spared in Williams syndrome, (WMS)subjects – and hence that it provides evidence for a geneticallyspecified language module. This argument is bolstered by treatingSpecific Language Impairments (SLI) and WMS as a developmental doubledissociation which identifies a syntax module. Neuroconstructivists haveargued that the cognitive deficits of a developmental disorder cannot beadequately distinguished using the standard gross behavioural tests ofneuropsychology and that the linguistic abilities of the (...)
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  35. added 2014-03-23
    Searching for the Switch: Neural Bases for Perceptual Rivalry Alternations. [REVIEW]John D. Pettigrew - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (1):85-118.
    A midbrain neural basis for the perceptualoscillations of binocular rivalry is suggestedon the basis of fMRI studies of rivalry andinferences from the properties of rivalry thatcannot be explained from the known propertiesof primary visual cortical (V1) neurons. Therivalry switch is proposed to activatehomologous areas of each cerebral hemispherealternately, by means of a bistable oscillatorcircuit that straddles the midline of theventral tegmentum. This bistable oscillatoroperates at the same slow rate that ischaracteristic of perceptual rivalryalternations. Whilst attempting to divert thepresent preoccupation with (...)
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  36. added 2014-03-21
    Genetic and Biological Determinants of Psychological Traits.Colin Martindale - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):897-898.
    Rose seems to be arguing against an extreme ultra-Darwinism that probably has no adherents. He incorrectly argues that a number of psychological traits are very difficult to measure. This is not the case. Rose argues that intelligence has no biological correlates. In fact, it is correlated with brain size, EEG evoked potentials, and cerebral glucose uptake during problem solving. Data that Rose should be aware of are omitted when they do not fit the case he is trying to make.
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  37. added 2014-03-18
    Moral Unreason: The Case of Psychopathy.Heidi Lene Maibom - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (2):237-57.
    Psychopaths are renowned for their immoral behavior. They are ideal candidates for testing the empirical plausibility of moral theories. Many think the source of their immorality is their emotional deficits. Psychopaths experience no guilt or remorse, feel no empathy, and appear to be perfectly rational. If this is true, sentimentalism is supported over rationalism. Here, I examine the nature of psychopathic practical reason and argue that it is impaired. The relevance to morality is discussed. I conclude that rationalists can explain (...)
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  38. added 2014-03-14
    A Self Frozen in Time and Space: Catatonia as a Kinesthetic Analog to Mirrored Self-Misidentification.Steven M. Platek & Gordon G. Gallup - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):589-590.
    Aspects of Northoff's argument lend themselves to the ongoing investigation of localizing the self in the brain. Recent data from the fields of neuropsychology and cognitive neuroscience provide evidence that the right hemisphere is a candidate for localization of self. The data on catatonia further that proposition and add insight into the continuing investigation of self in the brain across sensory and motor domains.
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  39. added 2014-03-14
    Does the Form of Akinetic Mutism Linked to Mesodiencephalic Injuries Bridge the Double Dissociation of Parkinson's Disease and Catatonia?Ayeesha K. Kamal & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-587.
    Northoff provides a compelling argument supporting a kind of “double dissociation” of Parkinson's disease and catatonia. We discuss a related form of akinetic mutism linked to mesodiencephalic injuries and suggest an alternative to the proposed “horizontal” versus “vertical” modulation distinction. Rather than a “directional” difference in patterned neuronal activity, we propose that both disorders reflect hypersynchrony within typically interdependent but segregated networks facilitated by a common thalamic gating mechanism.
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  40. added 2014-03-14
    How Connectionist Simulations Fail to Account for Developmental Disorders in Children.Christine Temple & Harald Clahsen - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):769-770.
    Using connectionist modelling, Thomas & Karmiloff-Smith (T&K-S) claim that developmental disorders in children are characterised by atypical trajectories and an ultimate functional architecture that is fundamentally different from normal. We argue that there is no empirical evidence for these claims in any developmental disorder and that the available evidence provides support for Residual Normality in both developmental and acquired disorders. We also refute the claim that modular accounts cannot encompass developmental trajectories in children with developmental disorders.
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  41. added 2014-03-12
    Cortex Excitability, Epilepsy and Brain Illness: Which Are Their Correct Relationships?Massimo Barrella - 2008 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 1 (1):37-39.
    In their work Gilio et al. investigate the mechanisms involved in the regulation of excitability of the cortex in epileptic subjects, and in particular their epileptogenic threshold.
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  42. added 2014-03-09
    ‘Faultless’ Ignorance: Strengths and Limitations of Epistemic Definitions of Confabulation.Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle E. Cox - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  43. added 2014-03-09
    Auditory Hallucinations, Network Connectivity, and Schizophrenia.Ralph E. Hoffman, Maxine Varanko, Thomas H. McGlashan & Michelle Hampson - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):860-861.
    Multidisciplinary studies indicate that auditory hallucinations may arise from speech perception neurocircuitry without disrupted theory of mind capacities. Computer simulations of excessive pruning in speech perception neural networks provide a model for these hallucinations and demonstrate that connectivity reductions just below a “psychotogenic threshold” enhance information processing. These data suggest a process whereby vulnerability to schizophrenia is maintained in the human population despite reproductive disadvantages of this illness.
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  44. added 2014-03-09
    Differentiating Dissociation and Repression.John Morton - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):670-671.
    Now that consciousness is thoroughly out of the way, we can focus more precisely on the kinds of things that can happen underneath. A contrast can be made between dissociation and repression. Dissociation is where a memory record or set of autobiographical memory records cannot be retrieved; repression is where there is retrieval of a record but, because of the current task specification, the contents of the record, though entering into current processing, are not allowed into consciousness. I look at (...)
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  45. added 2014-03-07
    Wegner on Hallucinations, Inconsistency, and the Illusion of Free Will. Some Critical Remarks.Gerben Meynen - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):359-372.
    Wegner’s argument on the illusory nature of conscious will, as developed in The Illusion of Conscious Will (2002) and other publications, has had major impact. Based on empirical data, he develops a theory of apparent mental causation in order to explain the occurrence of the illusion of conscious will. Part of the evidence for his argument is derived from a specific interpretation of the phenomenon of auditory verbal hallucinations as they may occur in schizophrenia. The aim of this paper is (...)
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  46. added 2014-03-06
    Still PADing Along: Perception and Attention Remain Key Factors in Understanding Complex Visual Hallucinations.Daniel Collerton, Elaine Perry & Ian McKeith - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):776-794.
    Commentators agree that the Perception and Attention Deficit (PAD) model is a promising model for accounting for recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) across several disorders, though with varying detailed criticisms. Its central tenets are not modified, but further consideration of generative models of visual processing and the relationship of proto-objects and memory systems allows the PAD model to deal with variations in phenomenology. The commentaries suggest new ways to generate evidence that will test the model.
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  47. added 2014-03-04
    A Mind to Go Out Of: Reflections on Primary and Secondary Consciousness.Allan Hobson & Ursula Voss - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):993-997.
    Dreaming and waking are two brain-mind states, which are characterized by shared and differentiated properties at the levels of brain and consciousness. As part of our effort to capitalize on a comparison of these two states we have applied Edelman’s distinction between primary and secondary consciousness, which we link to dreaming and waking respectively. In this paper we examine the implications of this contrastive analysis for theories of mental illness. We conclude that while dreaming is an almost perfect model of (...)
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  48. added 2014-03-04
    Dreaming and Cognition in Patients with Frontotemporal Dysfunction.Teresa Paiva, Paulo Bugalho & Carla Bentes - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1027-1035.
    Individuals with Parkinson’s disease and temporal lobe epilepsy have hallucinations and mild cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this work was to study dreams in PD and TLE patients using a common functional model of dream production involving the limbic and paralimbic structures.Dreams were characterised in early-stage PD and TLE patients with dream diaries classified by the Hall van de Castle system and were compared with matched controls.In PD, there were significant differences between patients’ dreams and those of controls: animals, physical (...)
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  49. added 2014-03-04
    Dreaming and Hallucinations – Continuity or Discontinuity? Perspectives From Dementia with Lewy Bodies.Daniel Collerton & Elaine Perry - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1016-1020.
    Comparing the phenomenology, neurochemical pathology, and psychopharmacology of hallucinations and dreaming is limited by the available data. Evidence to date reveals no simple correspondence between the two states. Differences in the phenomenology of visual hallucinations and the visual component of dreams may reflect variations in visual context acting on the same underlying mechanism – the minimal visual input during dreaming contrasts with the more substantial perceived context in hallucinations. Variations in cholinergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter function during sleep and during (...)
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  50. added 2014-03-04
    Autobiographical Memory for Stressful Events: The Role of Autobiographical Memory in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.David C. Rubin, Michelle F. Dennis & Jean C. Beckham - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):840-856.
    To provide the three-way comparisons needed to test existing theories, we compared (1) most-stressful memories to other memories and (2) involuntary to voluntary memories (3) in 75 community dwelling adults with and 42 without a current diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Each rated their three most-stressful, three most-positive, seven most-important and 15 word-cued autobiographical memories, and completed tests of personality and mood. Involuntary memories were then recorded and rated as they occurred for 2 weeks. Standard mechanisms of cognition and (...)
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