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  1. Making Sense of Spousal Revenge Filicide.Glenn Carruthers - forthcoming - Aggression and Violent Behavior.
    “Spousal revenge” killers murder their child apparently out of a desire to cause harm to their ex-partner, the child’s other parent. Standard explanations of these killings fail to provide an adequate solution to what I call the problem of spousal revenge filicide. This is the problem of how a killer comes to take their rage at their former partner out on their own child and how that child can be dehumanized to the point of murder. Although the dehumanization of the (...)
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  2. Imposter Syndrome and Self-Deception.Stephen Gadsby - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    Many intelligent, capable, and successful individuals believe that their success is due to luck and fear that they will someday be exposed as imposters. A puzzling feature of this phenomenon, commonly referred to as imposter syndrome, is that these same individuals treat evidence in ways that maintain their false beliefs and debilitating fears: they ignore and misattribute evidence of their own abilities, while readily accepting evidence in favour of their inadequacy. I propose a novel account of imposter syndrome as an (...)
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  3. Anorexia: A Disease of Doubling.Drew Leder - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):93-96.
  4. Compulsions, Compatibilism, and Control.Gerben Meynen - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):343-345.
  5. Anorexia: Beyond the Body Uncanny.Katherine J. Morris - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):97-98.
  6. Philosophy and Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder.Dan J. Stein - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):339-342.
  7. Scrupulosity and Moral Responsibility.Jesse Summers & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - forthcoming - In Matt King & Joshua May (eds.), Agency in Mental Disorder: Philosophical Dimensions. Oxford University Press.
    Scrupulosity is a form of OCD where patients obsess about morality and sometimes compulsively confess or atone. It involves chronic doubt and anxiety as well as deviant moral judgments. This chapter argues that Scrupulosity is a mental illness and that its distortion of moral judgments undermines, or at least reduces, patients’ moral responsibility. The authors go on to argue that this condition challenges popular deep-self theories of responsibility, which assert that one is only blameworthy or praiseworthy for actions that arise (...)
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  8. The Sense of Self Over Time: Assessing Diachronicity in Dissociative Identity Disorder, Psychosis and Healthy Comparison Groups.Martin J. Dorahy, Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Rosemary J. Marsh, Brooke Johnson, Kate Fox & Warwick Middleton - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Dissociative experiences have been associated with diachronic disunity. Yet, this work is in its infancy. Dissociative identity disorder is characterized by different identity states reporting their own relatively continuous sense of self. The degree to which patients in dissociative identity states experience diachronic unity has not been empirically explored. This study examined the degree to which patients in dissociative identity states experienced diachronic unity. Participants were DID adults assessed in adult and child identity states, adults with a psychotic illness, adults (...)
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  9. A Brief Online and Offline (Paper-and-Pencil) Screening Tool for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: The Final Phase in the Development and Validation of the Mental Health Screening Tool for Anxiety Disorders.Shin-Hyang Kim, Kiho Park, Seowon Yoon, Younyoung Choi, Seung-Hwan Lee & Kee-Hong Choi - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Generalized anxiety disorder can cause significant socioeconomic burden and daily life dysfunction; hence, therapeutic intervention through early detection is important. This study was the final stage of a 3-year anxiety screening tool development project that evaluated the psychometric properties and diagnostic screening utility of the Mental Health Screening Tool for Anxiety Disorders, which measures GAD. A total of 527 Koreans completed online and offline versions of the MHS: A, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, and Penn State Worry Questionnaire. The (...)
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  10. An Enactive Approach to Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders.Gerrit Glas - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):35-50.
    Enactive approaches to emotion are rare and to anxiety and anxiety disorder even more. This article aims to show how an enactive paradigm might be helpful in solving some problems in the clinical and scientific understanding of anxiety and anxiety disorder. I begin by pointing at a number of relevant clinical features of anxiety and anxiety disorder and by sketching how and why anxiety theories have difficulties with doing justice to these features. I specifically focus on two themes: a) how (...)
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  11. Is ‘Gender Disappointment’ a Unique Mental Illness?Tereza Hendl & Tamara Kayali Browne - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):281-294.
    ‘Gender disappointment’ is the feeling of sadness when a parent’s strong desire for a child of a certain sex is not realised. It is frequently mentioned as a reason behind parents’ pursuit of sex selection for social reasons. It also tends to be framed as a mental disorder on a range of platforms including the media, sex selection forums and among parents who have been interviewed about sex selection. Our aim in this paper is to investigate whether ‘gender disappointment’ represents (...)
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  12. An Anthropological Perspective on Autism.Ben Belek - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):231-241.
    In her 2006 book The Jumbled Jigsaw, Donna Williams, an autistic author and poet, presents an example of a list of traits associated with autism—one of many such lists commonly found in text books, academic publications, and information leaflets. Her list includes the following: a tendency to stick to well-tried routines and avoid change, a tendency to have a narrow range of interests, a tendency to develop irrational fears and anxieties, a tendency not to develop a sense of danger, a (...)
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  13. From Mental Illness to Moral Injury: Psychological and Philosophical Perspectives on the Harm of Sexual Violence.Zenon Culverhouse - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 81-94.
    Since its introduction into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the diagnostic category of post-traumatic stress disorder has dominated public and legal discourse about the harm of sexual violence against women. There is, however, disagreement among some clinical psychologists and philosophers over whether a PTSD diagnosis further harms the victim. Clinical psychologists claim that focusing on a PTSD diagnosis risks undermining a victim’s agency and subjectivity if therapists neglect the victim’s own voice and experiences. Philosophers who acknowledge PTSD (...)
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  14. Anorexia Nervosa: A Case for Exceptionalism in Ethical Decision Making.Simona Giordano - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (4):315-331.
    The principles that usually direct ethical decision making are not easily or straightforwardly applicable to the care and treatment of anorexia nervosa, particularly the care and treatment of severe and enduring anorexia nervosa, where the sufferer seems to be recalcitrant to treatment and where the condition has become life-threatening.There are exceptional circumstances that characterize this puzzling and still scarcely understood condition; I suggest that these exceptional circumstances provide moral reasons for partial derogation from the usual principles of ethical decision making.In (...)
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  15. Review of Inner Speech. New Voices (OUP), Edited by Peter Langland-Hassan and Agustín Vicente. [REVIEW]Marta Jorba - 2019 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  16. The Epistemic Innocence of Clinical Memory Distortions.Lisa Bortolotti & Ema Sullivan-Bissett - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (3):263-279.
    In some neuropsychological disorders memory distortions seemingly fill gaps in people’s knowledge about their past, where people’s self-image, history, and prospects are often enhanced. False beliefs about the past compromise both people’s capacity to construct a reliable autobiography and their trustworthiness as communicators. However, such beliefs contribute to people’s sense of competence and self-confidence, increasing psychological wellbeing. Here we consider both psychological benefits and epistemic costs, and argue that distorting the past is likely to also have epistemic benefits that cannot (...)
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  17. Communicative, Cognitive and Emotional Issues in Selective Mutism.Micaela Capobianco & Luca Cerniglia - 2018 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 19 (3):445-458.
    Selective mutism is a developmental disorder characterized by a child’s inability to speak in certain contexts and/or in the presence of unfamiliar interlocutors. This work proposes a critical discussion of the most recent studies on SM, with respect to clinical and diagnostic features, as well as the etiology and treatment of this disorder. At present, all research work supports the hypothesis that SM is a complex anxiety disorder with multifactorial etiology. The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of (...)
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  18. The Network Approach to Psychopathology: Promise Versus Reality.Miriam K. Forbes, Aidan G. C. Wright, Kristian E. Markon & Robert F. Krueger - 2018 - World Psychiatry 18 (3):272-273.
    The network approach to psychopathology has recently gen-erated enthusiasm in the research community. This is likely due in large part to network methods being promoted with the prom-ise of improving clinical prevention and intervention strategies by explicating the dynamic causal architecture of mental illness1. As a result, studies using network methods have proliferated with the aim of understanding causal interactions between psychiat-ric symptoms through empirical data.
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  19. Intrusive Uncertainty in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.Tom Cochrane & Keeley Heaton - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (2):182-208.
    In this article we examine obsessive compulsive disorder. We examine and reject two existing models of this disorder: the Dysfunctional Belief Model and the Inference-Based Approach. Instead, we propose that the main distinctive characteristic of OCD is a hyperactive sub-personal signal of being in error, experienced by the individual as uncertainty about his or her intentional actions. This signalling interacts with the anxiety sensitivities of the individual to trigger conscious checking processes, including speculations about possible harms. We examine the implications (...)
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  20. Akratic Feelings.Karyn L. Freedman - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):355-357.
    It sometimes seems to us that our judgments about what we ought to believe diverge from what we in fact believe. I may be perfectly aware that I am not particularly risking my life by flying, for instance, and yet, as I tighten my seatbelt in preparation for takeoff, I may nevertheless embrace the seemingly paradoxical thought that I am likely to die in a matter of mere seconds. In moments like this, it can feel to us like we are (...)
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  21. The Everyday Dynamics of Rumination and Worry: Precipitant Events and Affective Consequences.Katharina Kircanski, Renee J. Thompson, James Sorenson, Lindsey Sherdell & Ian H. Gotlib - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (7):1424-1436.
    ABSTRACTRumination and worry are two perseverative, negatively valenced thought processes that characterise depressive and anxiety disorders. Despite significant research interest, little is known about the everyday precipitants and consequences of rumination and worry. Using an experience sampling methodology, we examined and compared rumination and worry with respect to their relations to daily events and affective experience. Participants diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, co-occurring MDD–GAD, or no diagnosis carried an electronic device for one week and reported on rumination, (...)
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  22. DSM-V and the Diagnostic Role of Psychotic.Pablo Lopez-Silva - 2017 - Archives of Clinical Psychiatry 44 (6).
  23. Trauma and Belief.Julia Tanney - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):351-353.
    We undergo a traumatic experience, such as a life-threatening accident or a brutal attack. We survive a period of relentless stress, perhaps because we are in a war zone and witness or commit atrocities. Raised by parents who are alcoholic or mentally ill, we endure traumatic experiences on a daily basis. Or, we are ignored, neglected, or treated as playthings by narcissistic parents, who themselves were ignored and neglected, and on and on through generations. To survive these experiences, perhaps we (...)
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  24. Love's Exemplars: A Response to Gupta, Earp, and Savulescu.Andrew McGee - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):101-102.
    I am grateful to Brian Earp, Julian Savulescu, and Kristina Gupta for their thoughtful remarks on my paper. I cannot answer all of their points here, but select what I consider to be the most important. Gupta believes that I commit myself to “a common sense” account of love. This is not so. “Common sense” refers to beliefs, not concepts. Concepts can be used to express true, false, and diametrically opposed beliefs, so are not themselves beliefs; rather, they are the (...)
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  25. Causes and Correlates of Intrusive Memory: A Response to Clark, MacKay, Holmes and Bourne.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Psychological Medicine 46 (15):3255-3258.
  26. Locating Thought Insertion on the Map of Ordinary Thinking.Victoria Y. Allison-Bolger - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):235-238.
    In her account of thought insertion, Pedrini follows the prevailing view that it is an error about ‘who is thinking a thought.’ This view is based on a particular characterization of thinking as analogous to physical actions, where an object can be made, possessed, moved about, and put in and out of containers. This picture is well-suited for explaining thought insertion where the speaker talks of having the thoughts of others put into his mind. The question, ‘Who is thinking?’ can (...)
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  27. Clinical Anecdotes: A Logic in Madness.Aaron J. Hauptman - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (4):303-305.
    The ultimate language of madness is that of reason.In short, under the chaotic and manifest delirium reigns the order of a secret delirium. In this second delirium, which is, in a sense, pure reason, reason delivered of all the external tinsel of dementia, is located the paradoxical truth of madness. And this in a double sense, since we find here both what makes madness true and what makes it truly madness.At the urging of his parents, Mr. A, a college-age young (...)
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  28. Depression in Asperger's : Identity and Capacity.Robert S. Kruger - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (4):323-325.
    In his case report, A Logic in Madness, Aaron Hauptman details the case of Mr. A, an intelligent college student with Asperger’s syndrome, who became severely depressed subsequent to what he perceived as a rejection by what he viewed as “the love of his life.” Dr. Hauptman describes Mr. A as suicidal and as suffering from all the hallmarks of a major depression. At the urging of his family, he presents himself to a psychiatric inpatient unit and agrees to a (...)
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  29. From Being Unaccountable to Suffering From Severe Mental Disorder and (Possibly) Back Once Again to Being Unaccountable.Christer Svennerlind - 2015 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 8 (2):45-58.
    From 1965, the Swedish penal law does not require accountability as a condition for criminal responsibility. Instead, severely mentally disordered offenders are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care. The process that led to the present legislation had its origins in a critique of the concept of accountability that was first launched 50 years earlier by the founding father of Swedish forensic psychiatry, Olof Kinberg. The concept severe mental disorder is part of the Criminal Code as well as the Compulsory Mental Act. (...)
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  30. A New History of Ourselves, in the Shadow of Our Obsessions and Compulsions.Pierre-Henri Castel, Angela Verdier & Louis Sass - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (4):299-309.
    Before broaching our main subject, and exploring why, among all disorders of the mind, obsessive-compulsive disorders have a place apart, I would like to start from a dilemma that is well-known to historians interested in mental disorders. According to one approach, a mental illness X is considered as a bona fide or ‘genuine’ illness if, and only if, it originates from a disturbance of the brain. Its neurobiological form is in this case considered as invariant, whatever cultural veneer might give (...)
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  31. France and the United States: Two Styles of Dealing With Adversity.Alain Ehrenberg - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (4):363-366.
    My article in this issue of PPP is based on a lengthy book, La Société du malaise, in which I examine the shift from Oedipal neurosis to narcissistic pathologies in France and in the United States, viewing this shift in connection with changes in social ideals regarding autonomy that I summarize as autonomy–aspiration and autonomy–condition. Using the notion of social pathology, I consider sociological/anthropological dimensions of so-called mental health problems by viewing them as individualistic ways of dealing with adversity or (...)
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  32. A Bio-Social and Ethical Framework for Understanding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.Carla Meurk, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):337-344.
    The diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders is embedded in a matrix of biological, social and ethical processes, making it an important topic for crossdisciplinary social and ethical research. This article reviews different branches of research relevant to understanding how FASD is identified and defined and outlines a framework for future social and ethical research in this area. We outline the character of scientific research into FASD, epidemiological discrepancies between reported patterns of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the incidence (...)
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  33. Enhancing Autonomy by Reducing Impulsivity: The Case of ADHD.Jonathan Pugh - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):373-375.
    In a recent article in this journal, Schaefer et al. argue that it might be possible to enhance autonomy through the use of cognitive enhancements. In this article, I highlight an example that Schaefer et al. do not acknowledge of a way in which we already seem to be using pharmacological agents in a manner that can be understood as enhancing an agent’s autonomy. To make this argument, I begin by following other theorists in the philosophical literature in claiming that (...)
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  34. Can Psychiatry Distinguish Social Deviance From Mental Disorder?Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed & Rachel Bingham - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (3):243-255.
    Can psychiatry distinguish social deviance from mental disorder? Historical and recent abuses of psychiatry indicate that this is an important question to address. Typically, the deviance/disorder distinction has been made, conceptually, on the basis of dysfunction. Challenges to naturalistic accounts of dysfunction suggest that it is time to adopt an alternative strategy to draw the deviance/disorder distinction. This article adopts and follows through such a strategy, which is to draw the distinction in terms of the origins of distress with the (...)
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  35. Authenticity, Values, and Context in Mental Disorder: The Case of Children With ADHD.Ilina Singh - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (3):237-240.
  36. Self-Insight in the Time of Mood Disorders: After the Diagnosis, Beyond the Treatment.Serife Tekin - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (2):139-155.
    This paper explores the factors that contribute to the degree of a mood disorder patient’s self- insight, defined here as her understanding of the particular contingencies of her life that are responsive to her personal identity, interpersonal relationships, illness symptoms, and the relationship between these three necessary components of her lived experience. I consider three factors: (i) the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), (ii) the DSM culture, and (iii) the cognitive architecture of the self. I argue that the (...)
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  37. Self, Narrative, and the Culture of Therapy.Somogy Varga - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (2):161-163.
  38. Anorexia Nervosa as a Passion.Louis C. Charland, Tony Hope, Anne Stewart & Jacinta Tan - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):353-365.
    Contemporary diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa explicitly refer to affective states of fear and anxiety regarding weight gain, as well as a fixed and very strong attachment to the pursuit of thinness as an overarching personal goal. Yet current treatments for that condition often have a decidedly cognitive orientation and the exact nature of the contribution of affective states and processes to anorexia nervosa remains largely uncharted theoretically. Taking our inspiration from the history of psychiatry, we argue that conceptualizing anorexia (...)
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  39. Is Alcohol Addiction Usefully Called a Disease?Nick Heather - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):321-324.
  40. Autonomy and the Relational Self.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):183-185.
  41. Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism.Yasuhiko Murakami - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of the (...)
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  42. Psychopharmacological Practice: The DSM Versus The Brain.T. L. Schwartz - 2013 - Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):25.
    In 1952, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) system of creating, validating, studying and employing a diagnostic system in clinical psychiatric practice was introduced. There have been several updates and revisions to this manual and, regardless of its a theoretical framework, it actually does have a framework and presupposition. Essentially the DSM dictates that all psychiatric disorders are syndromes, or a collection of symptoms that commonly occur together and impair psychosocial functioning. These syndromes allow for homogenous groups (...)
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  43. Psychiatry's Catch 22, Need for Precision, and Placing Schools in Perspective.A. R. Singh - 2013 - Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):42.
    The catch 22 situation in psychiatry is that for precise diagnostic categories/criteria, we need precise investigative tests, and for precise investigative tests, we need precise diagnostic criteria/categories; and precision in both diagnostics and investigative tests is nonexistent at present. The effort to establish clarity often results in a fresh maze of evidence. In finding the way forward, it is tempting to abandon the scientific method, but that is not possible, since we deal with real human psychopathology, not just concepts to (...)
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  44. Ayahuasca as Antidepressant? Psychedelics and Styles of Reasoning in Psychiatry.Brian T. Anderson - 2012 - Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):44-59.
    There is a growing interest among scientists and the lay public alike in using the South American psychedelic brew, ayahuasca, to treat psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. Such a practice is controversial due to a style of reasoning within conventional psychiatry that sees psychedelic-induced modified states of consciousness as pathological. This article analyzes the academic literature on ayahuasca's psychological effects to determine how this style of reasoning is shaping formal scientific discourse on ayahuasca's therapeutic potential as a treatment for (...)
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  45. Intimations of Immortality.Peter Fifield & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):141-144.
    Young’s paper (2012) offers an interesting and fruitful extension to recent work on Cotard’s syndrome, and in particular, a philosophical investigation of how and why beliefs around death and non-existence frequently co-occur with beliefs around immortality. In this brief response, we discuss a few issues from the paper. Namely, the issue of Cotard delusion being a natural kind, the seeming paradox of death and immortality and its relation to wider culture and literature, and the utility of the concept of misplaced (...)
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  46. There's Binding and There's Binding, or is There Just Binding? : Neuropsychological Insights From Bálint's Syndrome.Glyn Humphreys - 2012 - In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. pp. 324.
  47. Language and Human Nature. Kurt Goldstein's Neurolinguistic Foundation of a Holistic Philosophy.David Ludwig - 2012 - Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 48 (1):40-54.
    Holism in interwar Germany provides an excellent example for social and political in- fluences on scientific developments. Deeply impressed by the ubiquitous invocation of a cultural crisis, biologists, physicians, and psychologists presented holistic accounts as an alternative to the “mechanistic worldview” of the nineteenth century. Although the ideological background of these accounts is often blatantly obvious, many holistic scientists did not content themselves with a general opposition to a mechanistic worldview but aimed at a rational foundation of their holistic projects. (...)
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  48. A Strengthened Ethical Version of Moore's Paradox? Lived Paradoxes of Self-Loathing in Psychosis and Neurosis.Rupert Read - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):133 - 141.
    Wittgenstein once remarked: ?nobody can truthfully say of himself that he is filth. Because if I do say it, though it can be true in a sense, this is not a truth by which I myself can be penetrated: otherwise I should either have to go mad or change myself.? This has an immediate corollary, previously unnoted: that it may be true that someone is simply filth?a rotten person through and through?and also true that they don?t believe that they are (...)
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  49. Gloomy Duck or Cheerful Rabbit?Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):21-23.
  50. Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory.Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas De Block (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Maladapting Minds discusses a number of reasons why philosophers of psychiatry should take an interest in evolutionary explanations of mental disorders and, more generally, in evolutionary thinking. First of all, there is the nascent field of evolutionary psychiatry. Unlike other psychiatrists, evolutionary psychiatrists engage with ultimate, rather than proximate, questions about mental illnesses. Being a young and youthful new discipline, evolutionary psychiatry allows for a nice case study in the philosophy of science. Secondly, philosophers of psychiatry have engaged with evolutionary (...)
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