Results for 'Richard S. W. Masters'

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  1.  37
    Cognitive Demands of Error Processing Associated with Preparation and Execution of a Motor Skill.Wing Kai Lam, Richard S. W. Masters & Jonathan P. Maxwell - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1058-1061.
    Maxwell et al. [Maxwell, J. P., Masters, R. S. W., Kerr, E., & Weedon, E. . The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049–1068. The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049–1068] suggested that, following unsuccessful movements, the learner forms hypotheses about the probable causes of the error and the required movement adjustments necessary for its elimination. Hypothesis testing is an explicit process that places demands (...)
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  2.  33
    Taking a Conscious Look at the Body Schema.Jonathan P. Maxwell, Richard S. W. Masters & John van der Kamp - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):216-217.
    Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) propose a somatosensory perceptual pathway that informs a consciously accessible body image, and an action pathway that provides information to a body schema, which is not consciously accessible. We argue that the body schema may become accessible to consciousness in some circumstances, possibly resulting from cross talk, but that this may be detrimental to skilled movement production.
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  3.  38
    Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue.R. S. W. Masters, J. M. Poolton & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.
    Implicit processes almost certainly preceded explicit processes in our evolutionary history, so they are likely to be more resistant to disruption according to the principles of evolutionary biology [Reber, A. S. . The cognitive unconscious: An evolutionary perspective. Consciousness and Cognition, 1, 93–133.]. Previous work . Knowledge, nerves and know-how: The role of explicit versus implicit knowledge in the breakdown of a complex motor skill under pressure. British Journal of Psychology, 83, 343–358.]) has shown that implicitly learned motor skills remain (...)
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  4.  26
    Marginally Perceptible Outcome Feedback, Motor Learning and Implicit Processes.Rich S. W. Masters, Jon P. Maxwell & Frank F. Eves - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):639-645.
    Participants struck 500 golf balls to a concealed target. Outcome feedback was presented at the subjective or objective threshold of awareness of each participant or at a supraliminal threshold. Participants who received fully perceptible feedback learned to strike the ball onto the target, as did participants who received feedback that was only marginally perceptible . Participants who received feedback that was not perceptible showed no learning. Upon transfer to a condition in which the target was unconcealed, performance increased in both (...)
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  5.  74
    Benefits of an External Focus of Attention: Common Coding or Conscious Processing?J. M. Poolton, J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & M. Raab - 2006 - Journal of Sports Sciences 24 (1):89-99.
  6. Leibniz.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2014 - Polity.
    Few philosophers have left a legacy like that of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. He has been credited not only with inventing the differential calculus, but also with anticipating the basic ideas of modern logic, information science, and fractal geometry. He made important contributions to such diverse fields as jurisprudence, geology and etymology, while sketching designs for calculating machines, wind pumps, and submarines. But the common presentation of his philosophy as a kind of unworldly idealism is at odds with all this bustling (...)
     
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  7.  28
    The Role of Working Memory in Motor Learning and Performance.J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & F. F. Eves - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):376-402.
    Three experiments explore the role of working memory in motor skill acquisition and performance. Traditional theories postulate that skill acquisition proceeds through stages of knowing, which are initially declarative but later procedural. The reported experiments challenge that view and support an independent, parallel processing model, which predicts that procedural and declarative knowledge can be acquired separately and that the former does not depend on the availability of working memory, whereas, the latter does. The behaviour of these two processes was manipulated (...)
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  8.  35
    Effects of Failure Stress Upon Skilled Performance.Richard S. Lazarus & Charles W. Eriksen - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (2):100.
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  9.  14
    Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue.J. M. Poolton, R. S. W. Masters & J. P. Maxwell - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):456-468.
    Heuristics of evolutionary biology dictate that phylogenetically older processes are inherently more stable and resilient to disruption than younger processes. On the grounds that non-declarative behaviour emerged long before declarative behaviour, Reber argues that implicit learning is supported by neural processes that are evolutionarily older than those supporting explicit learning. Reber suggested that implicit learning thus leads to performance that is more robust than explicit learning. Applying this evolutionary framework to motor performance, we examined whether implicit motor learning, relative to (...)
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  10.  4
    Scaling Sporting Equipment for Children Promotes Implicit Processes During Performance.Tim Buszard, Damian Farrow, Machar Reid & Rich S. W. Masters - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:247-255.
  11.  9
    The Effects of Controllability on Extinction.Richard S. Calef, Donald W. Murray, Preston D. Modlin, Byarr W. Meekins & E. Scott Geller - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (5):241-243.
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  12.  5
    Chronologies in Old World Archaeology.Richard S. Ellis & Robert W. Ehrich - 1967 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 87 (3):358.
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  13.  5
    What Are “Normal Movements” in Any Population?R. S. W. Masters & R. C. J. Polman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):81-82.
  14.  21
    Attention and Time Constraints in Perceptual-Motor Learning and Performance: Instruction, Analogy, and Skill Level.Johan M. Koedijker, Jamie M. Poolton, Jonathan P. Maxwell, Raôul R. D. Oudejans, Peter J. Beek & Rich S. W. Masters - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):245-256.
    We sought to gain more insight into the effects of attention focus and time constraints on skill learning and performance in novices and experts by means of two complementary experiments using a table tennis paradigm. Experiment 1 showed that skill-focus conditions and slowed ball frequency disrupted the accuracy of experts, but dual-task conditions and speeded ball frequency did not. For novices, only speeded ball frequency disrupted accuracy. In Experiment 2, we extended these findings by instructing novices either explicitly or by (...)
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  15. Leibniz’s Theory of Space.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):499-528.
    In this paper I offer a fresh interpretation of Leibniz’s theory of space, in which I explain the connection of his relational theory to both his mathematical theory of analysis situs and his theory of substance. I argue that the elements of his mature theory are not bare bodies (as on a standard relationalist view) nor bare points (as on an absolutist view), but situations. Regarded as an accident of an individual body, a situation is the complex of its angles (...)
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  16. Presupposition, Aggregation, and Leibniz’s Argument for a Plurality of Substances.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:91-115.
    This paper consists in a study of Leibniz’s argument for the infinite plurality of substances, versions of which recur throughout his mature corpus. It goes roughly as follows: since every body is actually divided into further bodies, it is therefore not a unity but an infinite aggregate; the reality of an aggregate, however, reduces to the reality of the unities it presupposes; the reality of body, therefore, entails an actual infinity of constituent unities everywhere in it. I argue that this (...)
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  17. Newton's Fluxions and Equably Flowing Time.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):323-351.
  18.  8
    Erratum to “Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue” [Consiousness and Cognition, 16, 456–468, 2007]. [REVIEW]J. M. Poolton, R. S. W. Masters & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):408-408.
  19. Leibniz’s Actual Infinite in Relation to His Analysis of Matter.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2015 - In David Rabouin, Philip Beeley & Norma B. Goethe (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
  20. On the Non-Existence of Parallel Universes in Chemistry.Richard F. W. Bader - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):11-37.
    This treatise presents thoughts on the divide that exists in chemistry between those who seek their understanding within a universe wherein the laws of physics apply and those who prefer alternative universes wherein the laws are suspended or ‘bent’ to suit preconceived ideas. The former approach is embodied in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), a theory based upon the properties of a system’s observable distribution of charge. Science is experimental observation followed by appeal to theory that, upon (...)
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  21.  67
    Leibniz’s Mechanical Principles : Commentary and Translation.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - The Leibniz Review 23:101-105.
  22. Time Lapse and the Degeneracy of Time: Gödel, Proper Time and Becoming in Relativity Theory.Richard T. W. Arthur - unknown
    In the transition to Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity (SR), certain concepts that had previously been thought to be univocal or absolute properties of systems turn out not to be. For instance, mass bifurcates into (i) the relativistically invariant proper mass m0, and (ii) the mass relative to an inertial frame in which it is moving at a speed v = βc, its relative mass m, whose quantity is a factor γ = (1 – β2) -1/2 times the proper mass, (...)
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  23.  24
    Negative Contrast as a Function of the Location of Small Reinforced Placements.Richard S. Calef, Earl McHewitt, Donald W. Murray, James R. Brogan, Richard D. Cameron & E. Scott Geller - 1980 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (3):185-187.
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  24.  10
    The Effects of Noncontingent Reinforcement on the Behavior of a Previously Learned Running Response.Richard S. Calef, Michael C. Choban, Marcus W. Dickson, Paul D. Newman, Maureen Boyle, Nikki D. Baxa & E. Scott Geller - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (3):263-266.
  25.  22
    Changes in Contraceptive Use and Fertility: El Salvador, 1978–88.Richard S. Monteith, Charles W. Warren, Jose Mario Caceres & Howard I. Goldberg - 1991 - Journal of Biosocial Science 23 (1):79-89.
    In El Salvador from 1978 to 1988, contraceptive use among married women 15–44 years of age increased from 34% to 47%, and the total fertility rate declined from 6·3 to 4·6 children per woman. Most of this change took place from 1978 to 1985. Sterilization is the most prevalent method used, but nearly one-half of the women who are sterilized did not use any contraception before their operation. Few young couples use reversible methods of contraception to space births or delay (...)
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  26. The Labyrinth of the Continuum: Writings on the Continuum Problem, 1672-1686.Richard T. W. Arthur (ed.) - 2001 - Yale University Press.
    This book gathers together for the first time an important body of texts written between 1672 and 1686 by the great German philosopher and polymath Gottfried Leibniz. These writings, most of them previously untranslated, represent Leibniz’s sustained attempt on a problem whose solution was crucial to the development of his thought, that of the composition of the continuum. The volume begins with excerpts from Leibniz’s Paris writings, in which he tackles such problems as whether the infinite division of matter entails (...)
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  27. Natural Deduction: An Introduction to Logic with Real Arguments, a Little History and Some Humour.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    Richard Arthur’s _Natural Deduction_ provides a wide-ranging introduction to logic. In lively and readable prose, Arthur presents a new approach to the study of logic, one that seeks to integrate methods of argument analysis developed in modern “informal logic” with natural deduction techniques. The dry bones of logic are given flesh by unusual attention to the history of the subject, from Pythagoras, the Stoics, and Indian Buddhist logic, through Lewis Carroll, Venn, and Boole, to Russell, Frege, and Monty Python.
     
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  28. Time, Inertia and the Relativity Principle.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2007
    In this paper I try to sort out a tangle of issues regarding time, inertia, proper time and the so-called “clock hypothesis” raised by Harvey Brown's discussion of them in his recent book, Physical Relativity. I attempt to clarify the connection between time and inertia, as well as the deficiencies in Newton's “derivation” of Corollary 5, by giving a group theoretic treatment original with J.-P. Provost. This shows how both the Galilei and Lorentz transformations may be derived from the relativity (...)
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  29.  7
    Implementing a Shared Decision‐Making and Cognitive Strategy‐Based Intervention: Knowledge User Perspectives and Recommendations.Kay‐Ann M. Allen, Katherine R. Dittmann, Jennifer A. Hutter, Catherine Chuang, Michelle L. Donald, Amie L. Enns, Nina Hovanec, Anne W. Hunt, Richard S. Kellowan, Elizabeth A. Linkewich, Alexandra S. Patel, Anisha Rehmtulla & Sara E. McEwen - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (2):575-581.
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  30.  18
    Ritualized Behavior in Sport.Robin C. Jackson & Rich S. W. Masters - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):621-622.
    We consider evidence for ritualized behavior in the sporting domain, noting that such behavior appears commonplace both before a competitive encounter and as part of pre-performance routines. The specific times when ritualized behaviors are displayed support the supposition that they provide temporary relief from pre-competition anxiety and act as thought suppressors in the moments preceding skill execution. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  31. Barbara H. Basden, David R. Basden, and Matthew J. Wright. Part-List Reexposure and Release Of.J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters, F. F. Eves, R. P. Behrendt, Jonathan M. Smallwood, Simona F. Baracaia, Michelle Lowe & Marc Obonsawin - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12:320.
  32.  20
    The Functional Anatomy of a Hysterical Paralysis.John C. Marshall, Peter W. Halligan, Gereon R. Fink, Derick T. Wade & Richard S. J. Frackowiak - 1997 - Cognition 64 (1):B1 - B8.
  33.  51
    Leibniz on Continuity.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:107 - 115.
    In this paper I attempt to throw new light on Leibniz's apparently conflicting remarks concerning the continuity of matter. He says that matter is "discrete" yet "actually divided to infinity" and (thus dense), and moreover that it fills (continuous) space. I defend Leibniz from the charge of inconsistency by examining the historical development of his views on continuity in their physical and mathematical context, and also by pointing up the striking similarities of his construal of continuity to the approach taken (...)
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  34.  4
    Fertility on the US–Mexico Border.Charles W. Warren, Richard S. Monteith & J. Timothy Johnson - 1989 - Journal of Biosocial Science 21 (4):409-418.
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  35.  15
    Use of Maternal–Child Health Services and Contraception in Guatemala and Panama.Charles W. Warren, Richard S. Monteith, J. Timothy Johnson, Roberto Santiso, Federico Guerra & Mark W. Oberle - 1987 - Journal of Biosocial Science 19 (2):229-243.
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  36.  32
    Disputed Questions on the Mystery of the Trinity. [REVIEW]B. W. A. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (1):117-118.
    The present volume is welcome for a dual reason; one that it marks the resumption, after a period of over twenty years, of the scholarly translations of St. Bonaventure, begun under Boehner; the second is the intrinsic value of the translation and lengthy introduction, almost a third of the book. Since the Saint Anthony Guild and Franciscan Herald Presses have published some of the shorter and more popular writings of the saint, it is fitting that the Franciscan Institute, noted for (...)
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  37.  7
    Utility of the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio Passive Seismic Method for Estimating Thickness of Quaternary Sediments in Minnesota and Adjacent Parts of Wisconsin.Val W. Chandler & Richard S. Lively - 2016 - Interpretation: SEG 4 (3):SH71-SH90.
    Quaternary glacial and fluvial sediments in Minnesota and adjacent areas are a major source for groundwater, and they are important to many geologic investigations. Unfortunately, the thicknesses of these widespread sediments are often poorly known. The horizontal-to-vertical-spectral ratio passive seismic method is being increasingly used in the region to assist in mapping the thickness of these sediments and the topography of the underlying bedrock surface. HVSR results when control sites with known sediment thickness are used to derive calibration curves that (...)
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  38.  13
    Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Infinitesimals II: Their Existence, Their Use and Their Role in the Justification of the Differential Calculus.David Rabouin & Richard T. W. Arthur - 2020 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 74 (5):401-443.
    In this paper, we endeavour to give a historically accurate presentation of how Leibniz understood his infinitesimals, and how he justified their use. Some authors claim that when Leibniz called them “fictions” in response to the criticisms of the calculus by Rolle and others at the turn of the century, he had in mind a different meaning of “fiction” than in his earlier work, involving a commitment to their existence as non-Archimedean elements of the continuum. Against this, we show that (...)
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  39.  17
    Edward Carter Moore 1917-1993.Arthur W. Burks & Richard S. Robin - 1994 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 67 (6):47 - 48.
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  40. La propuesta filosófica.Richard Rorty W. DarÓ & S. - 2001 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 23:95-122.
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  41.  10
    PLATO'S UNIVERSE by Gregory Vlastos.Richard N. W. Smith - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (2):64-67.
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  42. Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz's Labyrinth.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    In this new work, Richard T. W. Arthur offers a fresh interpretation of Leibniz's theory of substance. He goes against a long trend of idealistic interpretations of Leibniz's thought by instead taking seriously Leibniz's claim of introducing monads to solve the problem of the composition of matter and motion.
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  43.  19
    Beeckman's Discrete Moments and Descartes' Disdain.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (1):69-90.
    Descartes' allusions, in the Meditations and the Principles, to the individual moments of duration, has for some years stirred controversy over whether this commits him to a kind of time atomism. The origins of Descartes' way of treating moments as least intervals of duration can be traced back to his early collaboration with Isaac Beeckman. Where Beeckman (in 1618) conceived of moments as (mathematically divisible) physical indivisibles, corresponding to the durations of uniform motions between successive impacts on a body by (...)
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  44.  36
    Leibniz’s Causal Theory of Time Revisited.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:151-178.
    Following the lead of Hans Reichenbach in the early twentieth century, many authors have attributed a causal theory of time to Leibniz. My exposition of Leibniz’s theory of time in a paper of 1985 has been interpreted as a version of such a causal theory, even though I was critical of the idea that Leibniz would have tried to reduce relations among monadic states to causal relations holding only among phenomena. Since that time previously unpublished texts by Leibniz have become (...)
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  45. Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Actual Infinite.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - In Igor Agostini, Richard T. W. Arthur, Geoffrey Gorham, Paul Guyer, Mogens Lærke, Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Ohad Nachtomy, Sanja Särman, Anat Schechtman, Noa Shein & Reed Winegar (eds.), Infinity in Early Modern Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 155-179.
    It is well known that Leibniz advocated the actual infinite, but that he did not admit infinite collections or infinite numbers. But his assimilation of this account to the scholastic notion of the syncategorematic infinite has given rise to controversy. A common interpretation is that in mathematics Leibniz’s syncategorematic infinite is identical with the Aristotelian potential infinite, so that it applies only to ideal entities, and is therefore distinct from the actual infinite that applies to the actual world. Against this, (...)
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  46. Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Infinitesimals.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 67 (5):553-593.
    In contrast with some recent theories of infinitesimals as non-Archimedean entities, Leibniz’s mature interpretation was fully in accord with the Archimedean Axiom: infinitesimals are fictions, whose treatment as entities incomparably smaller than finite quantities is justifiable wholly in terms of variable finite quantities that can be taken as small as desired, i.e. syncategorematically. In this paper I explain this syncategorematic interpretation, and how Leibniz used it to justify the calculus. I then compare it with the approach of Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis, (...)
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  47.  8
    Moore's Notes on Leibniz Lectures.Richard T. W. Arthur & Nicholas Griffin - 2017 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 37 (1).
    G. E. Moore attended Russell’s lectures on Leibniz in 1899 and kept detailed notes which have been preserved among his papers. The present article prints his notes in their entirety with annotations.
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  48. Russell's Conundrum: On the Relation of Leibniz's Monads to the Continuum in An Intimate Relation. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1989 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 116:171-201.
  49.  9
    Russell's Leibniz Notebook.Richard T. W. Arthur & Nicholas Griffin - 2017 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 37 (1).
    In preparation for his lectures on Leibniz delivered in Cambridge in Lent Term 1899, Russell started in the summer of 1898 to keep notes on writings by and about Leibniz in a large notebook of the type he commonly used for notetaking at this time. This article prints, with annotation, all the material on Leibniz in that notebook.
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  50.  5
    Marginalia in Russell's Copy of Gerhardt's Edition of Leibniz's Philosophische Schriften.Richard T. W. Arthur, Jolen Galaugher & Nicholas Griffin - 2017 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 37 (1).
    Russell’s most important source for his book on Leibniz was C. I. Gerhardt’s seven-volume Die philosophischen Schriften von Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Russell heavily annotated his copy of this important edition of Leibniz’s works. The present paper records all Russell’s marginalia, with the exception of passages marked merely by vertical lines in the margin, and provides explanatory commentary.
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