Results for 'early modern natural philosophy'

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  1. Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Charles T. Wolfe - manuscript
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto historical and conceptual constellations (...)
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  2. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 87-102.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, (...)
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  3.  12
    Modelling the History of Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Fate of the Art-Nature Distinction in the Dutch Universities.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):46-74.
    ABSTRACTThe ‘model approach’ facilitates a quantitative-oriented study of conceptual changes in large corpora. This paper implements the ‘model approach’ to investigate the erosion of the traditional art-nature distinction in early modern natural philosophy. I argue that a condition for this transformation has to be located in the late scholastic conception of final causation. I design a conceptual model to capture the art-nature distinction and formulate a working hypothesis about its early modern fate. I test (...)
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  4. The Origins of Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (4):499-518.
    This paper argues that early modern experimental philosophy emerged as the dominant member of a pair of methods in natural philosophy, the speculative versus the experimental, and that this pairing derives from an overarching distinction between speculative and operative philosophy that can be ultimately traced back to Aristotle. The paper examines the traditional classification of natural philosophy as a speculative discipline from the Stagirite to the seventeenth century; medieval and early (...) attempts to articulate a scientia experimentalis; and the tensions in the classification of natural magic and mechanics that led to the introduction of an operative part of natural philosophy in the writings of Francis Bacon and John Johnston. The paper concludes with a summary of the salient discontinuities between the experimental/speculative distinction of the mid-seventeenth century and its predecessors and a statement of the developments that led to the ascendance of experimental philosophy from the 1660s. (shrink)
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  5.  22
    The Aeolipile as Experimental Model in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Craig Martin - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (3):264-284.
    What causes winds was regarded as one of the most difficult questions of early modern natural philosophy. Vitruvius, the ancient Roman architectural author, put forth an alternative to Aristotle’s theory by likening the generation of wind to the actions of the aeolipile, which he believed made artificial winds. As Vitruvius’s work proliferated during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, numerous natural philosophers, including Descartes, used the aeolipile as a model for nature. Yet, interpretations of Vitruvius’s text (...)
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  6.  52
    Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England.Peter Harrison - 2001 - Isis 92:265-290.
    [Introduction]: Curiosity is now widely regarded, with some justification, as a vital ingredient of the inquiring mind and, more particularly, as a crucial virtue for the practitioner of the pure sciences. We have become accustomed to associate curiosity with innocence and, in its more mature manifestations, with the pursuit of truth for its own sake. It was not always so. The sentiments expressed in Sir John Davies's poem, published on the eve of the seventeenth century, paint a somewhat different picture. (...)
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  7.  41
    Teleology in Early Modern Philosophy and Science.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    The vast majority of canonical early modern authors reject Aristotelian physics and metaphysics. Instead, many of them are mechanists, that is, they explain all natural change in the material world simply through the motions and collisions of inertial matter in motion. This typically means that they deny that there is immanent teleology in the natural world; sometimes, it even means eliminating purposiveness from natural philosophy altogether. Thus, some writers attempt to provide explanations of (...) phenomena that do not rely on teleology. Because this proves enormously difficult, others retain, or reintroduce, teleology in various forms. -/- The section “Rejections of Teleology” explores the reasons why certain early modern authors reject teleology more or less generally. The section “Defenses of Extrinsic Teleology” shows that quite a few writers embrace extrinsic teleology: they hold that many natural things and processes have ends in virtue of being part of God’s plan for the world. Some of these authors also advocate the use of teleology in natural philosophy, for instance, to discover natural laws. Finally, the section “Defenses of Immanent Teleology” shows that there are a few early modern philosophers and scientists who go even further than that, insisting on the need for immanent teleology in the natural world. (shrink)
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  8. Material Difficulties: Matter and the Metaphysics of Resurrection in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Christia Mercer - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):123-135.
    When Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600, philosophers were still inclined to offer natural explanations in Aristotelian terms. Neither the physical proposals of Bruno himself, nor those of other prominent non-Aristotelians like Paracelsus had diminished the power of the explanatory model offered by the scholastics. For those philosophers watching the demise of Bruno in the Campo dei Fiori in Rome, the burning of the wood and its subsequent effects would have been explained adequately in terms of matter (...)
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  9. Platonism in Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Case of Leibniz and Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Christoph Horn James Wilberding (ed.), Neoplatonic Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  10. Introduction to ‘Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy’.Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey - 2019 - In Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-7.
  11.  7
    The Science of Nature in the Seventeenth Century: Patterns of Change in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & John Schuster (eds.) - 2005 - Springer Science and Business Media.
    The seventeenth century marked a critical phase in the emergence of modern science. But we misunderstand this process, if we assume that seventeenth-century modes of natural inquiry were identical to the highly specialised, professionalised and ever proliferating family of modern sciences practised today.
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  12.  18
    Thinking with Crocodiles: An Iconic Animal at the Intersection of Early-Modern Religion and Natural Philosophy.Spencer J. Weinreich - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (3):209-240.
    This paper seeks to explore how culturally and religiously significant animals could shape discourses in which they were deployed, taking the crocodile as its case study. Beginning with the textual and visual traditions linking the crocodile with Africa and the Middle East, I read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century travel narratives categorizing American reptiles as “crocodiles” rather than “alligators,” as attempts to mitigate the disruptive strangeness of the Americas. The second section draws on Ann Blair’s study of “Mosaic Philosophy” to examine (...)
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  13.  11
    Divide Et Impera: Modelling the Relationship Between Canonical and Non-Canonical Authors in the Early Modern Natural Philosophy Network.Andrea Sangiacomo & Daan Beers - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
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  14. The General Metaphysics of Nature: Plotinus on Logos / Lloyd P. Gerson. The Significance of 'Physics' in Porphyry : The Problem of Body and Matter / Andrew Smith. Self-Motion and Reflection : Hermias and Proclus on the Harmony of Plato and Aristotle on the Soul / Stephen Menn. Nature in Proclus : From Irrational Immanent Principle to Goddess / Alain Lernould. Platonism in Early Modern Natural Philosophy : The Case of Leibniz and Conway. [REVIEW]Christia Mercer - 2012 - In James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.), Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford Up.
     
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  15.  9
    Early Modern Conceptions and Treatments of Space and Spatiality: Koen Vermeir and Jonathan Regier : Boundaries, Extents and Circulations: Space and Spatiality in Early Modern Natural Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer, 2016, €114.99 HB.Angela Axworthy - 2018 - Metascience 27 (2):309-312.
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  16.  3
    Introduction Pseudo-Paracelsus: Forgery and Early Modern Alchemy, Medicine and Natural Philosophy.Didier Kahn & Hiro Hirai - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 24 (5-6):415-418.
  17.  31
    Catholic Physics. Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2007 - Early Science and Medicine 12 (1):100-102.
  18.  18
    Rethinking Instrumentality: Natural Philosophy and Christian Charity in the Early Modern Atlantic World.Sarah Irving - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):55-76.
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  19.  25
    Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy.Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    Experimental philosophy was an exciting and extraordinarily successful development in the study of nature in the seventeenth century. Yet experimental philosophy was not without its critics and was far from the only natural philosophical method on the scene. In particular, experimental philosophy was contrasted with and set against speculative philosophy and, in some quarters, was accused of tending to irreligion. This volume brings together ten scholars of early modern philosophy, history and science (...)
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  20.  5
    Other Centres of Calculation, or, Where the Royal Society Didn't Count: Commerce, Coffee-Houses and Natural Philosophy in Early Modern London.Larry Stewart - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Science 32 (2):133-153.
    Wee people at London, are so humbly immersd in slavish business, & taken up wth providing for a wretched Carkasse; yt there's nothing almost, but what is grosse & sensuall to be gotten from us. If a bright thought springs up any time here, ye Mists & Foggs extinguish it again presently, & leaves us no more, yn only ye pain, of seeing it die & perish away from us. Humphrey Ditton to Roger Cotes, ca. 1703THE CALCULUS OF ACCOMPLISHMENTDuring the (...)
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  21.  42
    Mixing Metaphors: Science and Religion or Natural Philosophy and Theology in Early Modern Europe.Margaret J. Osler - 1998 - History of Science 36 (1):91-113.
  22.  7
    Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England.Peter Harrison - 2001 - Isis 92 (2):265-290.
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  23.  30
    Dennis Des Chene is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. His Research Interests Are in Early Modern Philosophy and Sci-Ence, and He has Written on Natural Philosophy—Including Physics and the Life Sciences—in Late Scholastic and Cartesian Thought. [REVIEW]Lisa Shapiro & Karen Detlefsen - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4).
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  24.  26
    Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology.Edward Grant - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):5-14.
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  25.  23
    Essay Review: Electricity and Natural Philosophy: Electricity in the 17th and 18th Centuries. A Study of Early Modern PhysicsElectricity in the 17th and 18th Centuries. A Study of Early Modern Physics. HeilbronJ. L. . Pp. 606. £24.00. [REVIEW]P. M. Heimann - 1981 - History of Science 19 (3):219-222.
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  26.  30
    Catholic Physics: Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany. By Marcus Hellyer: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Louis Caruana - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (4):683-685.
  27.  17
    Lawrence M. Principe , Chymists and Chymistry: Studies in the History of Alchemy and Early Modern Chemistry. Sagamore Beach, MA: Science History Publications/USA, 2007. Pp. Xiii+274. ISBN 978-0-88135-396-9. $45.00 .Anna Marie Roos, The Salt of the Earth: Natural Philosophy, Medicine, and Chymistry in England, 1650–1750. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xvi+293. ISBN 978-90-04-16176-4. $129.00. [REVIEW]Pamela Smith - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (1):130.
  28.  21
    Natural Law and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Europe: Jurisprudence, Theology, Moral and Natural Philosophy[REVIEW]Daniel Garber - 2010 - Isis 101:872-873.
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  29.  11
    At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert, Susan Wiseman.Katharine Park - 2001 - Isis 92 (4):759-760.
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  30.  10
    Robert Fox . Thomas Harriot and His World: Mathematics, Exploration, and Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England. Xvi + 255 Pp., Illus., Apps., Bibl., Index. Surrey: Ashgate, 2012. $124.95. [REVIEW]Amir Alexander - 2013 - Isis 104 (3):615-616.
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  31.  8
    Marcus Hellyer, Catholic Physics: Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany. Notre Dame, In: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. Pp. XII+337. Isbn 0-268-03071-5. $50.00. [REVIEW]Peter Dear - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):135-137.
  32.  13
    Abstract of Comments: Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? Content and Procedures.Edith Dudley Sylla - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):15 - 16.
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  33.  8
    Natural Law and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Europe: Jurisprudence, Theology, Moral and Natural Philosophy.Peter Anstey - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 20 (4):534-536.
  34.  4
    Mechanism as a Scientific Pluralism in the Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy: Peter Distelzweig, Benjamin Goldberg and Evan R. Ragland : Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, 2016, X + 372 Pp, €99.99HB.Sarah Carvallo - 2017 - Metascience 26 (1):41-44.
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  35.  5
    Catholic Physics: Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany.Claudia Stein - 2007 - Annals of Science 64 (4):607-608.
  36.  4
    Lorraine Daston;, Michael Stolleis . Natural Law and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Europe: Jurisprudence, Theology, Moral and Natural Philosophy. Xii + 338 Pp., Index. Farnham, Surrey/Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate Publishing, 2008. $114.95. [REVIEW]Daniel Garber - 2010 - Isis 101 (4):872-873.
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  37.  3
    Lorraine Daston and Michael Stolleis , Natural Law and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Europe: Jurisprudence, Theology, Moral and Natural Philosophy. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008. Pp. Xii+338. ISBN 978-0-7546-5761-3. £60.00. [REVIEW]John Henry - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (1):123-124.
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  38.  3
    Marcus Hellyer. Catholic Physics: Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany. 336 Pp., Bibl., App., Index. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. $50. [REVIEW]John W. O’Malley - 2006 - Isis 97 (2):349-351.
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  39.  2
    Robert Fox , Thomas Harriot and His World: Mathematics, Exploration and Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England. Farnham: Ashgate, 2012. Pp. Xviii+255. ISBN 978-0-7546-6960.9. £65.00. [REVIEW]Peter Rowlands - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (3):569-570.
  40. Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy.Peter Distelzweig & Evan Ragland (eds.) - 2016 - Springer.
     
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  41. At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period.Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) - 1999 - Palgrave.
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and cyborgs) and border practices (...)
     
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  42. From Experimental Natural Philosophy to Natural Religion: Action and Contemplation in the Early Royal Society.Elliot Rossiter - 2019 - In Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. Routledge.
    This chapter explores the ways in which the project of the early Royal Society supported the transformation of religion into a practical and reasonable activity that essentially consists in a kind of natural religion wherein we focus on what can be known about God and our duties through the natural light, understood in terms of an experimental approach to nature. More precisely, Rossiter argues that the natural religion supported by figures in and around the Royal Society (...)
     
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  43.  97
    Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy.Antonia LoLordo - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive treatment of the philosophical system of the seventeenth-century philosopher Pierre Gassendi. Gassendi's importance is widely recognized and is essential for understanding early modern philosophers and scientists such as Locke, Leibniz and Newton. Offering a systematic overview of his contributions, LoLordo situates Gassendi's views within the context of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century natural philosophy as represented by a variety of intellectual traditions, including scholastic Aristotelianism, Renaissance Neo-Platonism, and the emerging mechanical (...). LoLordo's work will be essential reading for historians of early modern philosophy and science. (shrink)
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  44.  31
    Francis Bacon and the Transformation of Early-Modern Philosophy.Stephen Gaukroger - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    This ambitious and important book, first published in 2001, provides a truly general account of Francis Bacon as a philosopher. It describes how Bacon transformed the values that had underpinned philosophical culture since antiquity by rejecting the traditional idea of a philosopher as someone engaged in contemplation of the cosmos. The book explores in detail how and why Bacon attempted to transform the largely esoteric discipline of natural philosophy into a public practice through a program in which practical (...)
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  45.  57
    The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy.Donald Rutherford (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy is a comprehensive introduction to the central topics and changing shape of philosophical inquiry in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It explores one of the most innovative periods in the history of Western philosophy, extending from Montaigne, Bacon and Descartes through Hume and Kant. During this period, philosophers initiated and responded to major intellectual developments in natural science, religion, and politics, transforming in the process concepts and doctrines inherited (...)
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  46.  22
    Jolley, Nicholas , Causality and Mind: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Markku Roinila - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (2):97-99.
    Causality and Mind presents seventeen of Nicholas Jolley's essays on early modern philosophy, which focus on two main themes. One theme is the continuing debate over the nature of causality in the period from Descartes to Hume. Jolley shows that, despite his revolutionary stance, Descartes did no serious re-thinking about causality; it was left to his unorthodox disciple Malebranche to argue that there is no place for natural causality in the new mechanistic picture of the physical (...)
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  47.  18
    Early Modern Natural Theologies.Scott Mandelbrote - 2013 - In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up. pp. 75.
    This chapter discusses natural theology in the early modern period. It demonstrates that early modern natural theology was a contested arena, in which a number of different standpoints might be justified based on the history of classical or Christian thought; that those different positions reflected disagreements about how one should read the evidence of nature, and what weight one should give to the Bible and to reason as lights to guide one in doing; and (...)
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  48. The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy.Virpi Mäkinen (ed.) - 2010 - The Philosophical Society of Finland.
  49.  36
    Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy (Review).Lisa T. Sarasohn - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 485-486.
    After a spate of monographs on Pierre Gassendi in the mid-1990s, the scholarly discussion of this most difficult French philosopher has largely been confined to the pages of scholarly journals. Except for Sylie Taussig's fine translation of Gassendi's Latin letters into French, and an issue of Dix-septième siècle devoted to the thinker, no major book-length study has appeared. Antonia LoLordo fills this gap in Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. Her aim is "defamiliarizing the (...)
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  50. Time and the Science of the Soul in Early Modern Philosophy.Michael Edwards - 2013 - Brill.
    _Time and the Science of the Soul in Early Modern Philosophy_ traces the complex and productive connections established between time and the soul from late Aristotelianism to the natural and political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes and René Descartes.
     
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