Results for 'mental imagery'

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  1. Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception.Robert Briscoe - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):153-173.
    The problem of amodal perception is the problem of how we represent features of perceived objects that are occluded or otherwise hidden from us. Bence Nanay (2010) has recently proposed that we amodally perceive an object's occluded features by imaginatively projecting them into the relevant regions of visual egocentric space. In this paper, I argue that amodal perception is not a single, unitary capacity. Drawing appropriate distinctions reveals amodal perception to be characterized not only by mental imagery, as (...)
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  2.  19
    Multimodal Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2018 - Cortex 105:125-136.
    When I am looking at my coffee machine that makes funny noises, this is an instance of multisensory perception – I perceive this event by means of both vision and audition. But very often we only receive sensory stimulation from a multisensory event by means of one sense modality, for example, when I hear the noisy coffee machine in the next room, that is, without seeing it. The aim of this paper is to bring together empirical findings about multimodal perception (...)
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  3. Mental Imagery.Alan W. Richardson - 1969 - Routledge.
     
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  4. Mental Imagery: In Search of a Theory.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):157-182.
    It is generally accepted that there is something special about reasoning by using mental images. The question of how it is special, however, has never been satisfactorily spelled out, despite more than thirty years of research in the post-behaviorist tradition. This article considers some of the general motivation for the assumption that entertaining mental images involves inspecting a picture-like object. It sets out a distinction between phenomena attributable to the nature of mind to what is called the cognitive (...)
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  5. Mental Imagery.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 2001 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Mental imagery (varieties of which are sometimes colloquially refered to as “visualizing,” “seeing in the mind's eye,” “hearing in the head,” “imagining the feel of,” etc.) is quasi-perceptual experience; it resembles perceptual experience, but occurs in the absence of the appropriate external stimuli. It is also generally understood to bear intentionality (i.e., mental images are always images of something or other), and thereby to function as a form of mental representation. Traditionally, visual mental imagery, (...)
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  6. Mental Imagery and Fiction.Dustin Stokes - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (6):731-754.
    Fictions evoke imagery, and their value consists partly in that achievement. This paper offers analysis of this neglected topic. Section 2 identifies relevant philosophical background. Section 3 offers a working definition of imagery. Section 4 identifies empirical work on visual imagery. Sections 5 and 6 criticize imagery essentialism, through the lens of genuine fictional narratives. This outcome, though, is not wholly critical. The expressed spirit of imagery essentialism is to encourage philosophers to ‘put the image (...)
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  7. Superimposed Mental Imagery: On the Uses of Make-Perceive.Robert Briscoe - 2018 - In Fiona Macpherson & Fabian Dorsch (eds.), Perceptual Imagination and Perceptual Memory. pp. 161-185.
    Human beings have the ability to ‘augment’ reality by superimposing mental imagery on the visually perceived scene. For example, when deciding how to arrange furniture in a new home, one might project the image of an armchair into an empty corner or the image of a painting onto a wall. The experience of noticing a constellation in the sky at night is also perceptual-imaginative amalgam: it involves both seeing the stars in the constellation and imagining the lines that (...)
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  8.  52
    Mental Imagery: Functional Mechanisms and Clinical Applications.Joel Pearson, Thomas Naselaris, Emily A. Holmes & Stephen M. Kosslyn - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):590-602.
  9.  65
    On the Demystification of Mental Imagery.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, Sophie Schwartz & G. Smith - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-81.
    What might a theory of mental imagery look like, and how might one begin formulating such a theory? These are the central questions addressed in the present paper. The first section outlines the general research direction taken here and provides an overview of the empirical foundations of our theory of image representation and processing. Four issues are considered in succession, and the relevant results of experiments are presented and discussed. The second section begins with a discussion of the (...)
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  10. Unconscious Imagination and the Mental Imagery Debate.Berit Brogaard & Dimitria Electra Gatzia - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Traditionally, philosophers have appealed to the phenomenological similarity between visual experience and visual imagery to support the hypothesis that there is significant overlap between the perceptual and imaginative domains. The current evidence, however, is inconclusive: while evidence from transcranial brain stimulation seems to support this conclusion, neurophysiological evidence from brain lesion studies (e.g., from patients with brain lesions resulting in a loss of mental imagery but not a corresponding loss of perception and vice versa) indicates that there (...)
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  11.  66
    The Two Faces of Mental Imagery.Margherita Arcangeli - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (2):304-322.
    Mental imagery has often been taken to be equivalent to “sensory imagination”, the perception‐like type of imagination at play when, for example, one visually imagines a flower when none is there, or auditorily imagines a music passage while wearing earplugs. I contend that the equation of mental imagery with sensory imagination stems from a confusion between two senses of mental imagery. In the first sense, mental imagery is used to refer to a (...)
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  12. Hallucination as Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (7-8):65-81.
    Hallucination is a big deal in contemporary philosophy of perception. The main reason for this is that the way hallucination is treated marks an important stance in one of the most hotly contested debates in this subdiscipline: the debate between 'relationalists' and 'representationalists'. I argue that if we take hallucinations to be a form of mental imagery, then we have a very straightforward way of arguing against disjunctivism: if hallucination is a form of mental imagery and (...)
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  13.  4
    Mental Imagery and the Third Dimension.Steven Pinker - 1980 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 109 (3):354-371.
  14. Literary Narrative and Mental Imagery: A View From Embodied Cognition.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2014 - Style 48 (3):275-293.
    The objective of this article is twofold. In the first part, I discuss two issues central to any theoretical inquiry into mental imagery: embodiment and consciousness. I do so against the backdrop of second-generation cognitive science, more specifically the increasingly popular research framework of embodied cognition, and I consider two caveats attached to its current exploitation in narrative theory. In the second part, I attempt to cast new light on readerly mental imagery by offering a typology (...)
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  15. Look Again: Phenomenology and Mental Imagery[REVIEW]Evan Thompson - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):137-170.
    This paper (1) sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery; (2) applies this analysis to the mental imagery debate in cognitive science; (3) briefly sketches a neurophenomenological approach to mental imagery; and (4) compares the results of this discussion with Dennett’s heterophenomenology.
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  16.  39
    Mental Imagery in Associative Learning and Memory.Allan Paivio - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (3):241-263.
  17.  77
    Mental Imagery in the Child: A Study of the Development of Imaginal Representation.Jean Piaget & Barbel Inhelder - 1971 - British Journal of Educational Studies 19 (3):343-344.
  18.  20
    Mental Imagery: On the Limits of Cognitive Science.Mark Rollins - 1989 - Yale University Press.
  19. Arguments Concerning Representations for Mental Imagery.John R. Anderson - 1978 - Psychological Review (4):249-277.
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  20. Mental Imagery, Philosophical Issues About.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 2005 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Volume 2, pp. 1147-1153. Nature Publishing Group.
  21.  61
    Mental Imagery: Against the Nihilistic Hypothesis.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Giorgio Ganis & William L. Thompson - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):109-111.
  22.  3
    Sensory Substitution and Multimodal Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2017 - Perception 46:1014-1026.
    Many philosophers use findings about sensory substitution devices in the grand debate about how we should individuate the senses. The big question is this: Is “vision” assisted by (tactile) sensory substitution really vision? Or is it tactile perception? Or some sui generis novel form of perception? My claim is that sensory substitution assisted “vision” is neither vision nor tactile perception, because it is not perception at all. It is mental imagery: visual mental imagery triggered by tactile (...)
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  23.  19
    On the Demystification of Mental Imagery.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, George E. Smith & Steven P. Shwartz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-548.
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  24.  19
    Mental Imagery and Synaesthesia: Is Synaesthesia From Internally-Generated Stimuli Possible?Mary Jane Spiller & Ashok S. Jansari - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):143-151.
  25. Principles of Mental Imagery.Ronald A. Finke - 1989 - MIT Press.
     
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  26.  17
    Mental Imagery as the Adaptationist Views It.John R. Pani - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):288-326.
    Mental images are one of the more obvious aspects of human conscious experience. Familiar idioms such as “the mind's eye” reflect the high status of the image in metacognition. Theoretically, a defining characteristic of mental images is that they can be analog representations. But this has led to an enduring puzzle in cognitive psychology: How do “mental pictures” fit into a general theory of cognition? Three empirical problems have constituted this puzzle: The incidence of mental images (...)
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  27. Perception and Imagination: Amodal Perception as Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (2):239-254.
    When we see an object, we also represent those parts of it that are not visible. The question is how we represent them: this is the problem of amodal perception. I will consider three possible accounts: (a) we see them, (b) we have non-perceptual beliefs about them and (c) we have immediate perceptual access to them, and point out that all of these views face both empirical and conceptual objections. I suggest and defend a fourth account, according to which we (...)
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  28. Perceptual Content and the Content of Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (7):1723-1736.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that the phenomenal similarity between perceiving and visualizing can be explained by the similarity between the structure of the content of these two different mental states. And this puts important constraints on how we should think about perceptual content and the content of mental imagery.
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  29.  49
    Pain and Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2017 - The Monist 100 (4):485-500.
    One of the most promising trends both in the neuroscience of pain and in psychiatric treatments of chronic pain is the focus on mental imagery. My aim is to argue that if we take these findings seriously, we can draw very important and radical philosophical conclusions. I argue that what we pretheoretically take to be pain is partly constituted by sensory stimulation-driven pain processing and partly constituted by mental imagery. This general picture can explain some problematic (...)
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  30.  36
    Mental Imagery Doesn't Work Like That.Stephen M. Kosslyn, William L. Thompson & Giorgio Ganis - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):198-200.
    This commentary focuses on four major points: (1) “Tacit knowledge” is not a complete explanation for imagery phenomena, if it is an explanation at all. (2) Similarities and dissimilarities between imagery and perception are entirely consistent with the depictive view. (3) Knowledge about the brain is crucial for settling the debate. (4) It is not clear what sort of theory Pylyshyn advocates.
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  31. Mental Imagery and Implicit Memory.Stephen M. Kosslyn & Samuel T. Moulton - 2012 - In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
  32.  45
    Is Mental Imagery Prominently Visual?Marta Olivetti Belardinelli & Rosalia Di Matteo - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):204-205.
    Neuroimaging and psychophysiological techniques have proved to be useful in comprehending the extent to which the visual modality is pervasive in mental imagery, and in comprehending the specificity of images generated through other sensory modalities. Although further research is needed to understand the nature of mental images, data attained by means of these techniques suggest that mental imagery requires at least two distinct processing components.
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  33.  33
    The Neurological Basis of Mental Imagery: A Componential Analysis.Martha J. Farah - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):245-272.
  34. Analog Representation Beyond Mental Imagery.James Blachowicz - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):55 - 84.
  35. Fidelity Without Mimesis: Mental Imagery From Visual Description.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2012 - In Gregory Currie, Petr Kotatko & Martin Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications.
    In this paper, I oppose the common assumption that visual descriptions in prose fiction are imageable by virtue of perceptual mimesis. Based on introspection as well as convergent support from cognitive science and other disciplines, I argue that visual description (and the mental imagery it elicits), unlike narrative (and the mental imagery it elicits), often stands in no positive relation to perceptual mimesis because it lacks a structural counterpart in perceptual experience. I present an alternative way (...)
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  36.  30
    Explaining Mental Imagery: Now You See It, Now You Don't.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):111-112.
  37.  3
    Explaining Mental Imagery: Now You See It, Now You Don't: Reply to Kosslyn Et Al.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):111-112.
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  38.  32
    Role of Mental Imagery in Free Recall of Deaf, Blind, and Normal Subjects.Ellis M. Craig - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):249.
  39.  87
    Statistics of Mental Imagery.Francis Galton - 1880 - Mind 5 (19):301-318.
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  40.  68
    Idioms and Mental Imagery: The Metaphorical Motivation for Idiomatic Meaning.Raymond W. Gibbs & Jennifer E. O'Brien - 1990 - Cognition 36 (1):35-68.
  41.  15
    Reinterpreting Visual Patterns in Mental Imagery.Ronald A. Finks, Steven Pinker & Martha J. Farah - 1989 - Cognitive Science 13 (1):51-78.
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  42.  4
    Mental Imagery for Musical Changes in Loudness.Freya Bailes, Laura Bishop, Catherine J. Stevens & Roger T. Dean - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  43.  23
    Mental Imagery: In Search of My Theory.Edward de Haan & André Aleman - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):188-189.
    We argue that the field has moved forward from the old debate about “analogical” versus “symbolic” processing. First, it is questionable that there is a strong a priori argument for assuming a common processing mode. Second, we explore the possibility that imagery is not a unitary mental function. Finally, we discuss the empirical basis of the involvement of primary areas.
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  44. Representationalism and the Phenomenology of Mental Imagery.Evan Thompson - 2008 - Synthese 160 (3):203--213.
    This paper sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery and uses it to criticize representationalism and the internalist-versus-externalist framework for understanding consciousness. Contrary to internalist views of mental imagery imagery experience is not the experience of a phenomenal mental picture inspected by the mind’s eye, but rather the mental simulation of perceptual experience. Furthermore, there are experiential differences in perceiving and imagining that are not differences in the properties represented by these experiences. (...)
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  45.  53
    The Debate About Mental Imagery.Michael Tye - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy 81 (November):678-91.
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  46.  3
    Mental Imagery: On the Limits of Cognitive Science.Joseph Levine & Mark Rollins - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):670.
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  47. Unconscious Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - forthcoming - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.
    Historically, mental imagery has been defined as an experiential state - as something necessarily conscious. But most behavioural or neuroimaging experiments on mental imagery - including the most famous ones - don’t actually take the conscious experience of the subject into consideration. Further, recent research highlights that there are very few behavioural or neural differences between conscious and unconscious mental imagery. I argue that treating mental imagery as not necessarily conscious (as potentially (...)
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  48.  21
    Reports of Mental Imagery in Retrieval From Long-Term Memory.William F. Brewer & John R. Pani - 1996 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):265-287.
    Phenomenal reports were obtained immediately after participants retrieved information from long-term memory. Data were gathered for six basic forms of memory and for three forms of memory that asked for declarative information about procedural tasks . The data show consistent reports of mental imagery during retrieval of information from the generic perceptual, recollective, motor—declarative, rote—declarative, and cognitive—declarative categories; much less imagery was reported for the semantic, motor, rote, and cognitive categories. Overall, the data provide support for the (...)
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  49.  2
    Mental imagery and the illusion of conscious will.Paulius Rimkevičius - forthcoming - Synthese:1-20.
    I discuss the suggestion that conscious will is an illusion. I take it to mean that there are no conscious decisions. I understand ‘conscious’ as accessible directly and ‘decision’ as the acquisition of an intention. I take the alternative of direct access to be access by interpreting behaviour. I start with a survey of the evidence in support of this suggestion. I argue that the evidence indicates that we are misled by external behaviour into making false positive and false negative (...)
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  50.  6
    Understanding Mental Imagery: Interpretive Metaphors Versus Explanatory Models.Frederick Hayes-Roth - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):553-554.
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