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  1. Jason Aleksander (2011). Dante's Understanding of the Two Ends of Human Desire and the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology. Journal of Religion 91 (2):158-187.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how this understanding defines philosophy’s and theology’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. I show that, while Dante devalues the philosophical authority associated with the traditional Aristotelian emphasis on the significance of contemplative activity, he does so in order to highlight philosophy’s ethico-political authority to guide human conduct toward its “earthly beatitude.” Moreover, I argue that, although Dante subordinates earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude, he (...)
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  2. Derek Allan (2014). A Logical Redeemer: Kirillov in Dostoevsky’s 'Demons'. Journal of European Studies 44.
    The engineer Kirillov, a major character in Dostoevsky's 'Demons', has provoked considerable critical disagreement. In 'The Myth of Sisyphus', Albert Camus argues that he expresses the theme of ‘logical suicide’ with ‘the most admirable range and depth’. Some recent commentators, however, have dismissed Kirillov as a madman in the grip of a mad theory. -/- While dissenting from Camus’s analysis in certain respects, this article offers an interpretation consistent with his basic argument. Kirillov’s suicide is based on a simple, if (...)
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  3. Derek Allan (1988). André Malraux: The Commitment to Action in 'La Condition Humaine'. In Harold Bloom (ed.), André Malraux's Man's Fate. Chelsea House.
    Discusses the function of action in Malraux's third and most famous novel.
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  4. Derek Allan (1982). The Psychology of a Terrorist: Tchen in 'La Condition Humaine'. Nottingham French Studies 21 (1):48-66.
    Discusses the psychology of the terrorist Tchen in Malraux's 'Man's Fate'.
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  5. Maria Antonaccio (2000). Picturing the Human: The Moral Thought of Iris Murdoch. Oxford University Press.
    Iris Murdoch has long been known as one of the most deeply insightful and morally passionate novelists of our time. This attention has often eclipsed Murdoch's sophisticated and influential work as a philosopher, which has had a wide-ranging impact on thinkers in moral philosophy as well as religious ethics and political theory. Yet it has never been the subject of a book-length study in its own right. Picturing the Human seeks to fill this gap. In this groundbreaking book, author Maria (...)
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  6. Cesáreo Bandera (1995). Book Review: The Sacred Game: The Role of the Sacred in the Genesis of Modern Literary Fiction. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
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  7. Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  8. Kathy Behrendt (2013). Hirsch, Sebald, and the Uses and Limits of Postmemory. In Russell J. A. Kilbourn & Eleanor Ty (eds.), The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 51-67.
    Marianne Hirsch’s influential concept of postmemory articulates the ethical significance of representing trauma in art and literature. Postmemory, for Hirsch, “describes the relationship of children of survivors of cultural or collective trauma to the experiences of their parents, experiences that they ‘remember’ only as the narratives and images with which they grew up, but that are so powerful, so monumental, as to constitute memories in their own right”. Through appeal to recent philosophical work on memory, the ethics of remembering, and (...)
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  9. Sandrine Berges (2006). The Hardboiled Detective as Moralist : Ethics in Crime Fiction. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper I want to investigate further a claim made by Martha Nussbaum and Wayne Booth, amongst others, that good literature can be morally valuable, by applying it to a certain kind of genre fiction: the modern harboiled detective novel.
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  10. Wayne C. Booth (1998). Why Banning Ethical Criticism is a Serious Mistake. Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):366-393.
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  11. Wayne C. Booth (1988). Why Ethical Criticism Fell on Hard Times. Ethics 98 (2):278-293.
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  12. Eva T. H. Brann (1998). When Does Amorality Become Immorality ? Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):166-170.
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  13. Daniel Brudney (2003). Marlow's Morality. Philosophy and Literature 27 (2):318-340.
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  14. Jacob Buganza (2012). Ethics, Literature, and Education. Ethics and Education 7 (2):125-135.
    In this article, the author makes attempts to demonstrate that, from the educational standpoint, the relationship between philosophy and literature cannot be overlooked. Even the most remote cultures testify their transmission of moral teaching through literary accounts. In this sense, the author promotes this methodology hence argues that the axial concept structured by ethics is the concept of acknowledgment. Secondly, the author explains how the concept of acknowledgment has been present in contemporary ethical discourses and proposes which he considers fundamental (...)
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  15. Noël Carroll (2002). The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature, and Moral Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) can function as an instrument of education and a source of knowledge.
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  16. Noël Carroll (2000). Art and Ethical Criticism: An Overview of Recent Directions of Research. Ethics 110 (2):350-387.
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  17. Noël Carroll (2000). McGinn's Ethics, Evil, and Fiction. Noûs 34 (4):648–656.
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  18. Lindsay Clare, Ronald Gallimore & G. Genevieve Patthey‐Chavez (1996). Using Moral Dilemmas in Children's Literature as a Vehicle for Moral Education and Teaching Reading Comprehension. Journal of Moral Education 25 (3):325-341.
    Abstract Moral development research has previously demonstrated that more extended discourse is a vital element in effective moral education, although the difficulty of implementing this type of discourse into classroom practice has seldom been discussed. In this study, transcripts of lessons were examined of a teacher systematically assisted to develop a more conversational style. These lessons were taped over the course of the school year at different times, beginning in the fall of the year. In addition, writing samples from children (...)
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  19. Vincent Colapietro (2002). Review of Michael Weston, Philosophy, Literature, and the Human Good. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
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  20. Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2001). Narrative Art and Moral Knowledge. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):109-124.
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  21. Colin Davis (1998). Ethics, Fiction, and the Death of the Other Sartre's `le Mur'. Sartre Studies International 4 (1):1-16.
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  22. A. E. Denham (2000). Metaphor and Moral Experience. Oxford University Press.
    Alison Denham examines the ways in which our engagement with literary art, and metaphorical discourse in particular, informs our moral beliefs. She considers to what extent moral and metaphorical discourses are capable of truth or falsehood, warrant or justification, and how it is that we understand these discourses. This vital new study offers a fresh view of the nature of the moral and the metaphorical, and the relations between art and morality.
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  23. Michael R. Depaul (1988). Argument and Perception: The Role of Literature in Moral Inquiry. Journal of Philosophy 85 (10):552-565.
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  24. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Literary Ethics.
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  25. Edward Greenwood (1998). Literature: Freedom or Evil? Sartre Studies International 4 (1):17-29.
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  26. Robert Guay (2006). The Tragic as an Ethical Category. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):555-561.
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  27. Michael L. Hall (1998). What Are We Teaching About Morality by Not Teaching Morality? Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):160-165.
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  28. Schuyler Dean Hoslett (1939). Lucretius: His Genius and His Moral Philosophy. Kansas City, the Midland Publishers.
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  29. Lawrence W. Hyman (1966). Moral Values and the Literary Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (4):539-547.
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  30. Eileen John (1995). Subtlety and Moral Vision in Fiction. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):308-319.
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  31. Sholom J. Kahn (1953). The Problem of Evil in Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 12 (1):98-110.
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  32. J. Gregory Keller (2005). The Moral Thinking of Macbeth. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):41-56.
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  33. Joseph G. Kronick (2006). The Ancient Quarrel Revisited: Literary Theory and the Return to Ethics. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):436-449.
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  34. Marguerite La Caze (2013). The Mute Foundation of Aesthetic Experience? Culture, Theory, and Critique 54 (2):209-224.
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  35. Andy Lamey (2010). Sympathy and Scapegoating in J.M. Coetzee. In Anton Leist & Peter Singer (eds.), J. M. Coetzee and Ethics: Philosophical Perspectives on Literature.
    J.M. Coetzee’s book, 'Elizabeth Costello' is one of the stranger works to appear in recent years. Yet if we focus our attention on the book’s two chapters dealing with animals, two preoccupations emerge. The first sees Coetzee use animals to evoke a particular conception of ethics, one similar to that of the philosopher Mary Midgley. Coetzee’s second theme connects animals to the phenomena of scapegoating, as it has been characterized by the philosophical anthropologist René Girard. While both themes involve human (...)
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  36. Anton Leist & Peter Singer (eds.) (2010). J. M. Coetzee and Ethics: Philosophical Perspectives on Literature. Columbia University Press.
    This collection takes stock of J.M. Coetzee's impact from a number of interesting angles, Including animals, sexuality, race, and reason. The time is truly ripe for such a volume.
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  37. Shen-yi Liao (2013). Moral Persuasion and the Diversity of Fictions. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):269-289.
    Narrative representations can change our moral actions and thoughts, for better or for worse. In this article, I develop a theory of fictions' capacity for moral education and moral corruption that is fully sensitive to the diversity of fictions. Specifically, I argue that the way a fiction influences our moral actions and thoughts importantly depends on its genre. This theory promises new insights into practical ethical debates over pornography and media violence.
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  38. Shen-yi Liao & Tamar Szabó Gendler (forthcoming). The Problem of Imaginative Resistance: An Overview. In John Gibson & Nöel Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge.
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  39. Shen-yi Liao & Sara Protasi (2013). The Fictional Character of Pornography. In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan. 100-118.
    We refine a line of feminist criticism of pornography that focuses on pornographic works' pernicious effects. A.W. Eaton argues that inegalitarian pornography should be criticized because it is responsible for its consumers’ adoption of inegalitarian attitudes toward sex in the same way that other fictions are responsible for changes in their consumers’ attitudes. We argue that her argument can be improved with the recognition that different fictions can have different modes of persuasion. This is true of film and television: a (...)
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  40. Greg Littmann (2012). American Gods is All Lies! In Tracy Lyn Bealer, Rachel Luria & Wayne Yuen (eds.), Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild! Open Court.
  41. Alice MacLachlan (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotions and Moral Value in Jane Austen and David Hume, E. M. Dadlez. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
  42. Peter McCormick (1983). Moral Knowledge and Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (4):399-410.
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  43. Colin McGinn (1997). Ethics, Evil, and Fiction. Oxford University Press.
    McGinn's latest brings together moral philosophy and literary analysis in a way that illuminates both. Setting out to enrich the domain of moral reflection by showing the value of literary texts as sources of moral illumination, McGinn starts by setting out an uncompromisingly realist ethical theory, arguing that morality is an area of objective truth and genuine knowledge. He goes on to address such subjects as the nature of goodness, evil character, and the meaning of monstrosity in the context of (...)
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  44. Adia Mendelson-Maoz (2007). Ethics and Literature: Introduction. Philosophia 35 (2):111-116.
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  45. Richard Green Moulton (1903/1969). The Moral System of Shakespeare. [Folcroft, Pa.Folcroft Press.
    THE MORAL SYSTEM OF SHAKESPEARE INTRODUCTION WHAT IS IMPLIED IN "THE MORAL SYSTEM OF SHAKESPEARE " The title of this work, The Moral System of Shakespeare, ...
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  46. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1993). The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music. Penguin.
    Classic, influential study of Greek tragedy.
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  47. Martha Nussbaum (1985). &Quot;finely Aware and Richly Responsible&Quot;: Moral Attention and the Moral Task of Literature. Journal of Philosophy 82 (10):516-529.
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  48. Martha Craven Nussbaum (1998). Exactly and Responsibly: A Defense of Ethical Criticism. Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):343-365.
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  49. Frank Palmer (1992). Literature and Moral Understanding: A Philosophical Essay on Ethics, Aesthetics, Education, and Culture. Clarendon Press.
    Recent philosophical discussion about the relation between fiction and reality pays little attention to our moral involvement with literature. Frank Palmer's purpose is to investigate how our appreciation of literary works calls upon and develops our capacity for moral understanding. He explores a wide range of philosophical questions about the relation of art to morality, and challenges theories that he regards as incompatible with a humane view of literary art. Palmer considers, in particular, the extent to which the values and (...)
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  50. Ella Peek, Ethical Criticism of Art. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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