Search results for 'Genome' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  25
    Martina Baumann (2016). CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing – New and Old Ethical Issues Arising From a Revolutionary Technology. NanoEthics 10 (2):139-159.
    Although germline editing has been the subject of debate ever since the 1980s, it tended to be based rather on speculative assumptions until April 2015, when CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to modify human embryos for the first time. This article combines knowledge about the technical and scientific state of the art, economic considerations, the legal framework and aspects of clinical reality. A scenario will be elaborated as a means of identifying key ethical implications of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in humans (...)
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  2.  33
    Kewal Krishan, Tanuj Kanchan & Bahadur Singh (2016). Human Genome Editing and Ethical Considerations. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):597-599.
    Editing human germline genes may act as boon in some genetic and other disorders. Recent editing of the genome of the human embryo with the CRISPR/Cas9 editing tool generated a debate amongst top scientists of the world for the ethical considerations regarding its effect on the future generations. It needs to be seen as to what transformation human gene editing brings to humankind in the times to come.
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  3.  7
    Ilhan Ilkilic & Norbert W. Paul (2009). Ethical Aspects of Genome Diversity Research: Genome Research Into Cultural Diversity or Cultural Diversity in Genome Research? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):25-34.
    The goal of the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) was to reconstruct the history of human evolution and the historical and geographical distribution of populations with the help of scientific research. Through this kind of research, the entire spectrum of genetic diversity to be found in the human species was to be explored with the hope of generating a better understanding of the history of humankind. An important part of this genome diversity research consists in taking blood and (...)
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  4.  22
    Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer (2013). Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent. Bioethics 27 (3):343-351.
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, (...)
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  5.  6
    James A. Shapiro (2006). Genome Informatics: The Role of DNA in Cellular Computations. Biological Theory 1 (3):288-301.
    Cells are cognitive entities possessing great computational power. DNA serves as a multivalent information storage medium for these computations at various time scales. Information is stored in sequences, epigenetic modifications, and rapidly changing nucleoprotein complexes. Because DNA must operate through complexes formed with other molecules in the cell, genome functions are inherently interactive and involve two-way communication with various cellular compartments. Both coding sequences and repetitive sequences contribute to the hierarchical systemic organization of the genome. By virtue of (...)
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  6.  12
    M. Blute (2005). If the Genome Isn't a God-Like Ghost in the Machine, Then What is It? Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):401-407.
    Implicit God-like and ghost-in-the-machine metaphors underlie much current thinking about genomes. Although many criticisms of such views exist, none have succeeded in substituting a different, widely accepted view. Viewing the genome with its protein packaging as a brain gets rid of Gods and ghosts while plausibly integrating machine and information-based views. While the ‘wetware’ of brains and genomes are very different, many fundamental principles of how they function are similar. Eukaryotic cells are compound entities in which case the nuclear (...)
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  7. Patricia S. Greenspan (1993). Free Will and the Genome Project. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):31-43.
    Popular and scientific accounts of the U.S. Human Genome Project often express concern about the implications of the project for the philosophic question of free will and responsibility. However, on its standard construal within philosophy, the question of free will versus determinism poses no special problems in relation to genetic research. The paper identifies a variant version of the free will question, free will versus internal constraint, that might well pose a threat to notions of individual autonomy and virtue (...)
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  8. Robin O. Andreasen & Milo J. Aukerman (2002). The Human Genome Project: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):673-678.
    In this paper we discuss the scientific value of the human genome project. To what extent is the data obtained by sequencing the entire human genome useful in the gene dicovery process? Responding to Alex Rosenberg' skepticism about the value of such data, we maintain that brute sequence data is much more useful than he suggests.
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  9.  41
    Marga Vicedo (1992). The Human Genome Project: Towards an Analysis of the Empirical, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues Involved. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):255-278.
    In this paper I claim that the goal of mapping and sequencing the human genome is not wholly new, but rather is an extension of an older project to map genes, a central aim of genetics since its birth. Thus, the discussion about the value of the HGP should not be posed in global terms of acceptance or rejection, but in terms of how it should be developed. The first section of this paper presents a brief history of the (...)
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  10.  14
    Rebecca L. Walker & Clair Morrissey (2014). Bioethics Methods in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project Literature. Bioethics 28 (9):481-490.
    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of a (...)
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  11.  23
    Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm (...)
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  12.  13
    Stephanie Fullerton & Sandra Lee (2011). Secondary Uses and the Governance of De-Identified Data: Lessons From the Human Genome Diversity Panel. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):16-.
    Background: Recent changes to regulatory guidance in the US and Europe have complicated oversight of secondary research by rendering most uses of de-identified data exempt from human subjects oversight. To identify the implications of such guidelines for harms to participants and communities, this paper explores the secondary uses of one de-identified DNA sample collection with limited oversight: the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP)-Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain, Fondation Jean Dausset (CEPH) Human Genome Diversity Panel. Methods: Using a combination (...)
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  13.  2
    R. Chadwick (2009). Gender And The Human Genome. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):10.
    _Gender issues arise in relation to the human genome across a number of dimensions: the level of attention given to the nuclear genome as opposed to the mitochondrial; the level of basic scientific research; decision-making in the clinic related to both reproductive decision-making on the one hand, and diagnostic and predictive testing on the other; and wider societal implications. Feminist bioethics offers a useful perspective for addressing these issues._.
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  14. Ehud Lamm (2010). Genes Versus Genomes: The Role of Genome Organization in Evolution. Dissertation, Tel Aviv University
    Recent and not so recent advances in our molecular understanding of the genome make the once prevalent view of the genome as a passive container of genetic information (i.e., genes) untenable, and emphasize the importance of the internal organization and re-organization dynamics of the genome for both development and evolution. While this conclusion is by now well accepted, the construction of a comprehensive conceptual framework for studying the genome as a dynamic system, capable of self-organization and (...)
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  15.  10
    Wentian Li (2012). Menzerath's Law at the Gene‐Exon Level in the Human Genome. Complexity 17 (4):49-53.
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  16.  9
    Ricard V. Solé (2010). Genome Size, Self‐Organization and DNA's Dark Matter. Complexity 16 (1):20-23.
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  17.  33
    Galen Wright, Pieter Koornhof, Adebowale Adeyemo & Nicki Tiffin (2013). Ethical and Legal Implications of Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing in African Populations. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):21.
    Rapid advances in high throughput genomic technologies and next generation sequencing are making medical genomic research more readily accessible and affordable, including the sequencing of patient and control whole genomes and exomes in order to elucidate genetic factors underlying disease. Over the next five years, the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Initiative, funded by the Wellcome Trust (United Kingdom) and the National Institutes of Health (United States of America), will contribute greatly towards sequencing of numerous African samples for (...)
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  18.  7
    Yuri I. Wolf & Eugene V. Koonin (2013). Genome Reduction as the Dominant Mode of Evolution. Bioessays 35 (9):829-837.
  19.  15
    Daniel J. Kevles (2009). Eugenics, the Genome, and Human Rights. Medicine Studies 1 (2):85-93.
    This article assesses the potential impact of current genomics research on human rights against the backdrop of the eugenics movement in the English-speaking world during first third of the twentieth century, The echo of eugenic interventions in societies far beyond Nazi Germany reverberates in the ethical debates triggered by the potential inherent in recent molecular biological developments. Mandatory eugenic restrictions of reproductive freedom seem less likely in countries committed to civil liberties than under authoritarian governments. More likely, consumer choice might (...)
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  20.  5
    Henry H. Q. Heng (2009). The Genome‐Centric Concept: Resynthesis of Evolutionary Theory. Bioessays 31 (5):512-525.
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  21.  7
    Michael J. Deem (2016). Whole-Genome Sequencing and Disability in the NICU: Exploring Practical and Ethical Challenges. Pediatrics 137 (s1):S47-S55.
  22.  13
    Zhijun Duan & Carl Anthony Blau (2012). The Genome in Space and Time: Does Form Always Follow Function? Bioessays 34 (9):800-810.
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  23.  6
    Kristien Hens (2011). Whole Genome Sequencing of Children’s DNA for Research: Points to Consider. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (7).
    This report is grounded in several social concepts: First, the primary goal of genetic testing should be to promote the well-being of the child. Second, the recognition that children are part of a network of family relationships supports an approach to potential conflicts that is not adversarial but, rather, emphasizes a deliberative process that seeks to promote the child's well-being within this context. Third, as children grow through successive stages of cognitive and moral development, parents and professionals should be attentive (...)
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  24.  1
    Ram Parikshan Kumar, Ramamoorthy Senthilkumar, Vipin Singh & Rakesh K. Mishra (2010). Repeat Performance: How Do Genome Packaging and Regulation Depend on Simple Sequence Repeats? Bioessays 32 (2):165-174.
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  25. Norio Fujiki, Darryl R. J. Macer & Eubios Ethics Institute (1994). Intractable Neurological Disorders, Human Genome Research and Society Proceedings of the Third International Bioethics Seminar in Fukui, 19-21 November, 1993. [REVIEW]
     
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  26. Darryl R. J. Macer, Michio Okamoto & Norio Fujiki (1996). Protection of the Human Genome and Scientific Responsibility Proceedings of the 1995 Murs-Japan/Unesco Ibc Seminars.
     
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  27.  74
    Nicholas Shea (2007). Representation in the Genome and in Other Inheritance Systems. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):313-331.
    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the genome is a representing system. Although it is widely recognised that DNA carries information, both correlating with and coding for various outcomes, neither of these implies that the genome has semantic properties like correctness or satisfaction conditions, In the Scope of Logic, Methodology, and the Philosophy of Sciences, Vol. II. Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 387–400). Here a modified version of teleosemantics is applied to the genome to show that it does (...)
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  28.  4
    Denis Noble (2006). The Music of Life: Biology Beyond the Genome. OUP Oxford.
    What is Life? This is the question asked by Denis Noble in this very personal and at times deeply lyrical book. Noble is a renowned physiologist and systems biologist, and he argues that the genome is not life itself: to understand what life is, we must view it at a variety of different levels, all interacting with each other in a complex web. It is that emergent web, full of feedback between levels, from the gene to the wider environment, (...)
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  29.  16
    Daniel Gibson, Benders G., A. Gwynedd, Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch, Evgeniya Denisova, Baden-Tillson A., Zaveri Holly, Stockwell Jayshree, B. Timothy, Anushka Brownley, David Thomas, Algire W., A. Mikkel, Chuck Merryman, Lei Young, Vladimir Noskov, Glass N., I. John, J. Craig Venter, Clyde Hutchison, Smith A. & O. Hamilton (2008). Complete Chemical Synthesis, Assembly, and Cloning of a Mycoplasma Genitalium Genome. Science 319 (5867):1215--1220.
    We have synthesized a 582,970-base pair Mycoplasma genitalium genome. This synthetic genome, named M. genitalium JCVI-1.0, contains all the genes of wild-type M. genitalium G37 except MG408, which was disrupted by an antibiotic marker to block pathogenicity and to allow for selection. To identify the genome as synthetic, we inserted "watermarks" at intergenic sites known to tolerate transposon insertions. Overlapping "cassettes" of 5 to 7 kilobases (kb), assembled from chemically synthesized oligonucleotides, were joined by in vitro recombination (...)
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  30.  3
    Amy McGuire, Christina Diaz, Tao Wang & Susan Hilsenbeck (2009). Social Networkers' Attitudes Toward Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6):3-10.
    Purpose: This study explores social networkers' interest in and attitudes toward personal genome testing (PGT), focusing on expectations related to the clinical integration of PGT results. Methods: An online survey of 1,087 social networking users was conducted to assess 1) use and interest in PGT; 2) attitudes toward PGT companies and test results; and 3) expectations for the clinical integration of PGT. Descriptive statistics were calculated to summarize respondents' characteristics and responses. Results: Six percent of respondents have used PGT, (...)
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  31. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Model Organisms as Models: Understanding the 'Lingua Franca' of the Human Genome Project. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S251-.
    Through an examination of the actual research strategies and assumptions underlying the Human Genome Project (HGP), it is argued that the epistemic basis of the initial model organism programs is not best understood as reasoning via causal analog models (CAMs). In order to answer a series of questions about what is being modeled and what claims about the models are warranted, a descriptive epistemological method is employed that uses historical techniques to develop detailed accounts which, in turn, help to (...)
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  32.  6
    Clarissa Allen & William D. Foulkes (2011). Qualitative Thematic Analysis of Consent Forms Used in Cancer Genome Sequencing. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):14.
    Large-scale whole genome sequencing (WGS) studies promise to revolutionize cancer research by identifying targets for therapy and by discovering molecular biomarkers to aid early diagnosis, to better determine prognosis and to improve treatment response prediction. Such projects raise a number of ethical, legal, and social (ELS) issues that should be considered. In this study, we set out to discover how these issues are being handled across different jurisdictions.
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  33.  35
    Ehud Lamm (2014). The Genome as a Developmental Organ. Journal of Physiology 592 (11):2237-2244.
    This paper applies the conceptual toolkit of Evolutionary Developmental Biology (evo‐devo) to the evolution of the genome and the role of the genome in organism development. This challenges both the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis, the dominant view in evolutionary theory for much of the 20th century, and the typically unreflective analysis of heredity by evo‐devo. First, the history of the marginalization of applying system‐thinking to the genome is described. Next, the suggested framework is presented. Finally, its application to (...)
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  34.  90
    M. Dodson & R. Williamson (1999). Indigenous Peoples and the Morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):204-208.
    In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about (...)
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  35.  83
    Christopher J. Austin (2015). The Dispositional Genome: Primus Inter Pares. Biology and Philosophy 30 (2):227-246.
    According to the proponents of Developmental Systems Theory and the Causal Parity Thesis, the privileging of the genome as “first among equals” with respect to the development of phenotypic traits is more a reflection of our own heuristic prejudice than of ontology - the underlying causal structures responsible for that specified development no more single out the genome as primary than they do other broadly “environmental” factors. Parting with the methodology of the popular responses to the Thesis, this (...)
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  36.  18
    Nicholas Shea, Representation in the Genome and in Other Inheritance Systems.
    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the genome is a representing system. Although it is widely recognised that DNA carries information, both correlating with and coding for various outcomes, neither of these implies that the genome has semantic properties like correctness or satisfaction conditions, In the Scope of Logic, Methodology, and the Philosophy of Sciences, Vol. II. Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 387-400). Here a modified version of teleosemantics is applied to the genome to show that it does (...)
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  37.  3
    Jane Kaye, Paula Boddington, Jantina de Vries, Naomi Hawkins & Karen Melham, Ethical Implications of the Use of Whole Genome Methods in Medical Research.
    The use of genome-wide association studies in medical research and the increased ability to share data give a new twist to some of the perennial ethical issues associated with genomic research. GWAS create particular challenges because they produce fine, detailed, genotype information at high resolution, and the results of more focused studies can potentially be used to determine genetic variation for a wide range of conditions and traits. The information from a GWA scan is derived from DNA that is (...)
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  38.  16
    J. Benjamin Hurlbut (2015). Limits of Responsibility: Genome Editing, Asilomar, and the Politics of Deliberation. Hastings Center Report 45 (5):11-14.
    On April 3, 2015, a group of prominent biologists and ethicists called for a worldwide moratorium on human genetic engineering in which the genetic modifications would be passed on to future generations. Describing themselves as “interested stakeholders,” the group held a retreat in Napa, California, in January to “initiate an informed discussion” of CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering technology, which could enable high-precision insertion, deletion, and recoding of genes in human eggs, sperm, and embryos. The group declared that the advent of (...)
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  39.  7
    Jérôme Pierrel (2012). An RNA Phage Lab: MS2 in Walter Fiers' Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Ghent, From Genetic Code to Gene and Genome, 1963-1976. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):109 - 138.
    The importance of viruses as model organisms is well-established in molecular biology and Max Delbrück's phage group set standards in the DNA phage field. In this paper, I argue that RNA phages, discovered in the 1960s, were also instrumental in the making of molecular biology. As part of experimental systems, RNA phages stood for messenger RNA (mRNA), genes and genome. RNA was thought to mediate information transfers between DNA and proteins. Furthermore, RNA was more manageable at the bench than (...)
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  40.  15
    Pilar N. Ossorio (2007). The Human Genome as Common Heritage: Common Sense or Legal Nonsense? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (3):425-439.
    This essay identifies two legal lineages underlying the common heritage concept, and applies each to the human genome. The essay notes some advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and argues that patenting of human genes would be allowable under either approach.
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  41.  20
    Eline Bunnik, Maartje Schermer & A. Cecile Janssens (2011). Personal Genome Testing: Test Characteristics to Clarify the Discourse on Ethical, Legal and Societal Issues. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):11-.
    Background: As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants (...)
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  42.  65
    Paul Lewis (1996). Polanyian Reflections on Embodiment, the Human Genome Initiative and Theological Anthropology. Tradition and Discovery 23 (2):5-14.
    The Human Genome Initiative represents an ambitious attempt to map the genetic structure of the human species (an estimated 100,00 genes). The project has generated a vast amount of theological and ethical literature, none of which discusses the impact of the project on understandings of embodiment. This gap is surprising since Michael Polanyi and, more recently, feminist thinkers have argued that embodiment is central to human existence. I argue that theologians and scientist can teach one another some important lessons (...)
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  43.  25
    Raphael Falk (2004). Long Live the Genome! So Should the Gene. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (1):105 - 121.
    Developments in the sequencing of whole genomes and in simultaneously surveying many thousands of transcription and translation products of specific cells have ushered in a conceptual revolution in genetics that rationally introduces top-down, holistic analyses. This emphasized the futility of attempts to reduce genes to structurally discrete entities along the genome, and the need to return to Johannsen's definition of a gene as 'something' that refers to an invariant entity of inheritance and development. We may view genes either as (...)
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  44.  22
    John A. Robertson (2003). The $1000 Genome: Ethical and Legal Issues in Whole Genome Sequencing of Individuals. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):35-42.
    Progress in gene sequencing could make rapid whole genome sequencing of individuals affordable to millions of persons and useful for many purposes in a future era of genomic medicine. Using the idea of $1000 genome as a focus, this article reviews the main technical, ethical, and legal issues that must be resolved to make mass genotyping of individuals cost-effective and ethically acceptable. It presents the case for individual ownership of a person's genome and its information, and shows (...)
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  45.  23
    Ernesto Schwartz-Marín & Irma Silva-Zolezzi (2010). “The Map of the Mexican’s Genome”: Overlapping National Identity, and Population Genomics. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):489-514.
    This paper explores the intersections between national identity and the production of medical/population genomics in Mexico. The ongoing efforts to construct a Haplotype Map of Mexican genetic diversity offers a unique opportunity to illustrate and analyze the exchange between the historic-political narratives of nationalism, and the material culture of genomic science. Haplotypes are central actants in the search for medically significant SNP’s, as well as powerful entities involved in the delimitation of ancestry, temporality and variability. By following the circulation of (...)
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  46. Nicholas Agar (1995). Designing Babies: Morally Permissible Ways to Modify the Human Genome. Bioethics 9 (1):1–15.
    My focus in this paper is the question of the moral acceptability of attempts to modify the human genome. Much of the debate in this area has revolved around the distinction between supposedly therapeutic modification on the one hand, and eugenic modification on the other. In the first part of the paper I reject some recent arguments against genetic engineering. In the second part I seek to distinguish between permissible and impermissible forms of intervention in such a way that (...)
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  47.  25
    David L. Wiesenthal & Neil I. Wiener (1996). Privacy and the Human Genome Project. Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):189 – 202.
    The Human Genome Project has raised many issues regarding the contributions of genetics to a variety of diseases and societal conditions. With genetic testing now easily conducted with lowered costs in nonmedical domains, a variety of privacy issues must be considered. Such testing will result in the loss of significant privacy rights for the individual. Society must now consider such issues as the ownership of genetic data, confidentiality rights to such information, limits placed on genetic screening, and legislation to (...)
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  48.  34
    Gunther Witzany (2008). The Viral Origins of Telomeres and Telomerases and Their Important Role in Eukaryogenesis and Genome Maintenance. Biosemiotics 1 (2):191-206.
    Whereas telomeres protect terminal ends of linear chromosomes, telomerases identify natural chromosome ends, which differ from broken DNA and replicate telomeres. Although telomeres play a crucial role in the linear chromosome organization of eukaryotic cells, their molecular syntax most probably descended from an ancient retroviral competence. This indicates an early retroviral colonization of large double-stranded DNA viruses, which are putative ancestors of the eukaryotic nucleus. This contribution demonstrates an advantage of the biosemiotic approach towards our evolutionary understanding of telomeres, telomerases, (...)
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  49. David Secko, Michael Burgess & Kieran O’Doherty (2010). Sequencing the Salmon Genome: A Deliberative Public Engagement. Genomics, Society and Policy 6:15-32.
    Salmon genomics is an emerging field that represents a convergence between socially important scientific innovation and a politically volatile topic of significant interest to the public. These factors provide a strong rationale for public input. This report describes such input from a public engagement event based on the principles of deliberative democracy. The event involved a random, demographically stratified sample of 25 British Columbians . While some participants opposed sequencing the salmon genome on principle, on the whole participants responded (...)
     
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  50.  15
    Stephen Jay Gould, Humbled by the Genome's Mysteries.
    Two groups of researchers released the formal report of data for the human genome last Monday -- on the birthday of Charles Darwin, who jump-started our biological understanding of life's nature and evolution when he published ''The Origin of Species'' in 1859. On Tuesday, and for only the second time in 35 years of teaching, I dropped my intended schedule -- to discuss the importance of this work with my undergraduate course on the history of life. (The only other (...)
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