Search results for 'Genome' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Patricia S. Greenspan (1993). Free Will and the Genome Project. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):31-43.score: 18.0
    Popular and scientific accounts of the U.S. Human Genome Project often express concern about the implications of the project for the philosophic question of free will and responsibility. However, on its standard construal within philosophy, the question of free will versus determinism poses no special problems in relation to genetic research. The paper identifies a variant version of the free will question, free will versus internal constraint, that might well pose a threat to notions of individual autonomy and virtue (...)
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  2. Ehud Lamm (2010). Genes Versus Genomes: The Role of Genome Organization in Evolution. Dissertation, Tel Aviv Universityscore: 18.0
    Recent and not so recent advances in our molecular understanding of the genome make the once prevalent view of the genome as a passive container of genetic information (i.e., genes) untenable, and emphasize the importance of the internal organization and re-organization dynamics of the genome for both development and evolution. While this conclusion is by now well accepted, the construction of a comprehensive conceptual framework for studying the genome as a dynamic system, capable of self-organization and (...)
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  3. Robin O. Andreasen & Milo J. Aukerman (2002). The Human Genome Project: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):673-678.score: 18.0
    In this paper we discuss the scientific value of the human genome project. To what extent is the data obtained by sequencing the entire human genome useful in the gene dicovery process? Responding to Alex Rosenberg' skepticism about the value of such data, we maintain that brute sequence data is much more useful than he suggests.
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  4. Marga Vicedo (1992). The Human Genome Project: Towards an Analysis of the Empirical, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues Involved. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):255-278.score: 18.0
    In this paper I claim that the goal of mapping and sequencing the human genome is not wholly new, but rather is an extension of an older project to map genes, a central aim of genetics since its birth. Thus, the discussion about the value of the HGP should not be posed in global terms of acceptance or rejection, but in terms of how it should be developed. The first section of this paper presents a brief history of the (...)
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  5. Rebecca L. Walker & Clair Morrissey (2013). Bioethics Methods in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project Literature. Bioethics 28 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 18.0
    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of (...)
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  6. M. Blute (2005). If the Genome Isn't a God-Like Ghost in the Machine, Then What is It? Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):401-407.score: 18.0
    Implicit God-like and ghost-in-the-machine metaphors underlie much current thinking about genomes. Although many criticisms of such views exist, none have succeeded in substituting a different, widely accepted view. Viewing the genome with its protein packaging as a brain gets rid of Gods and ghosts while plausibly integrating machine and information-based views. While the ‘wetware’ of brains and genomes are very different, many fundamental principles of how they function are similar. Eukaryotic cells are compound entities in which case the nuclear (...)
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  7. Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.score: 18.0
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm (...)
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  8. Stephanie Fullerton & Sandra Lee (2011). Secondary Uses and the Governance of De-Identified Data: Lessons From the Human Genome Diversity Panel. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):16-.score: 18.0
    Background: Recent changes to regulatory guidance in the US and Europe have complicated oversight of secondary research by rendering most uses of de-identified data exempt from human subjects oversight. To identify the implications of such guidelines for harms to participants and communities, this paper explores the secondary uses of one de-identified DNA sample collection with limited oversight: the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP)-Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain, Fondation Jean Dausset (CEPH) Human Genome Diversity Panel. Methods: Using a combination (...)
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  9. Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer (2013). Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent. Bioethics 27 (3).score: 18.0
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, (...)
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  10. Ilhan Ilkilic & Norbert W. Paul (2009). Ethical Aspects of Genome Diversity Research: Genome Research Into Cultural Diversity or Cultural Diversity in Genome Research? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):25-34.score: 18.0
    The goal of the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) was to reconstruct the history of human evolution and the historical and geographical distribution of populations with the help of scientific research. Through this kind of research, the entire spectrum of genetic diversity to be found in the human species was to be explored with the hope of generating a better understanding of the history of humankind. An important part of this genome diversity research consists in taking blood and (...)
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  11. R. Chadwick (2009). Gender And The Human Genome. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):10.score: 18.0
    _Gender issues arise in relation to the human genome across a number of dimensions: the level of attention given to the nuclear genome as opposed to the mitochondrial; the level of basic scientific research; decision-making in the clinic related to both reproductive decision-making on the one hand, and diagnostic and predictive testing on the other; and wider societal implications. Feminist bioethics offers a useful perspective for addressing these issues._.
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  12. Galen Wright, Pieter Koornhof, Adebowale Adeyemo & Nicki Tiffin (2013). Ethical and Legal Implications of Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing in African Populations. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):21.score: 16.0
    Rapid advances in high throughput genomic technologies and next generation sequencing are making medical genomic research more readily accessible and affordable, including the sequencing of patient and control whole genomes and exomes in order to elucidate genetic factors underlying disease. Over the next five years, the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Initiative, funded by the Wellcome Trust (United Kingdom) and the National Institutes of Health (United States of America), will contribute greatly towards sequencing of numerous African samples for (...)
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  13. Daniel J. Kevles (2009). Eugenics, the Genome, and Human Rights. Medicine Studies 1 (2):85-93.score: 16.0
    This article assesses the potential impact of current genomics research on human rights against the backdrop of the eugenics movement in the English-speaking world during first third of the twentieth century, The echo of eugenic interventions in societies far beyond Nazi Germany reverberates in the ethical debates triggered by the potential inherent in recent molecular biological developments. Mandatory eugenic restrictions of reproductive freedom seem less likely in countries committed to civil liberties than under authoritarian governments. More likely, consumer choice might (...)
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  14. Zhijun Duan & Carl Anthony Blau (2012). The Genome in Space and Time: Does Form Always Follow Function? Bioessays 34 (9):800-810.score: 15.0
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  15. Henry H. Q. Heng (2009). The Genome‐Centric Concept: Resynthesis of Evolutionary Theory. Bioessays 31 (5):512-525.score: 15.0
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  16. Rachel Maree Jones, Gemma Cadby, Phillip E. Melton, Lawrence J. Abraham, Andrew J. Whitehouse & Eric K. Moses (2013). Genome-Wide Association Study of Autistic-Like Traits in a General Population Study of Young Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 15.0
  17. Ram Parikshan Kumar, Ramamoorthy Senthilkumar, Vipin Singh & Rakesh K. Mishra (2010). Repeat Performance: How Do Genome Packaging and Regulation Depend on Simple Sequence Repeats? Bioessays 32 (2):165-174.score: 15.0
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  18. Wentian Li (2012). Menzerath's Law at the Gene‐Exon Level in the Human Genome. Complexity 17 (4):49-53.score: 15.0
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  19. Ricard V. Solé (2010). Genome Size, Self‐Organization and DNA's Dark Matter. Complexity 16 (1):20-23.score: 15.0
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  20. Yuri I. Wolf & Eugene V. Koonin (2013). Genome Reduction as the Dominant Mode of Evolution. Bioessays 35 (9):829-837.score: 15.0
  21. Ernesto Schwartz-Marín & Irma Silva-Zolezzi (2010). “The Map of the Mexican's Genome”: Overlapping National Identity, and Population Genomics. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):489-514.score: 14.0
    This paper explores the intersections between national identity and the production of medical/population genomics in Mexico. The ongoing efforts to construct a Haplotype Map of Mexican genetic diversity offers a unique opportunity to illustrate and analyze the exchange between the historic-political narratives of nationalism, and the material culture of genomic science. Haplotypes are central actants in the search for medically significant SNP’s (single nucleotide polymorphisms), as well as powerful entities involved in the delimitation of ancestry, temporality and variability (www.hapmap.org). By (...)
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  22. Jérôme Pierrel (2012). An RNA Phage Lab: MS2 in Walter Fiers' Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Ghent, From Genetic Code to Gene and Genome, 1963-1976. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):109 - 138.score: 14.0
    The importance of viruses as model organisms is well-established in molecular biology and Max Delbrück's phage group set standards in the DNA phage field. In this paper, I argue that RNA phages, discovered in the 1960s, were also instrumental in the making of molecular biology. As part of experimental systems, RNA phages stood for messenger RNA (mRNA), genes and genome. RNA was thought to mediate information transfers between DNA and proteins. Furthermore, RNA was more manageable at the bench than (...)
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  23. Hub Zwart (2013). The Genome as the Biological Unconscious – and the Unconscious as the Psychic 'Genome': A Psychoanalytical Rereading of Molecular Genetics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):198-222.score: 14.0
    1900 was a remarkable year for science. Several ground-breaking events took place, in physics, biology and psychology. Planck introduced the quantum concept, the work of Mendel was rediscovered, and Sigmund Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams . These events heralded the emergence of completely new areas of inquiry, all of which greatly affected the intellectual landscape of the 20 th century, namely quantum physics, genetics and psychoanalysis. What do these developments have in common? Can we discern a family likeness, a (...)
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  24. Ehud Lamm (2011). The Metastable Genome: A Lamarckian Organ in a Darwinian World? In Eva Jablonka & Snait Gissis (eds.), Transformations of Lamarckism: from subtle fluids to molecular biology. MIT Press.score: 12.0
    This article is arranged around two general claims and a thought experiment. I begin by suggesting that the genome should be studied as a developmental system, and that genes supervene on genomes (rather than the other way around). I move on to present a thought experiment that illustrates the implications a dynamic view of the genome has for central concepts in biology, in particular the information content of the genome, and the notion of responses to stress.
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  25. Nicholas Shea (2007). Representation in the Genome and in Other Inheritance Systems. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):313-331.score: 12.0
    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the genome is a representing system (Sterelny K., <span class='Hi'>Smith</span> K.C. and Dickson M. 1996. Biol. Philos. 11: 377–403; Griffiths P.E. 2001. Philos. Sci. 68: 394–412). Although it is widely recognised that DNA carries information, both correlating with and coding for various outcomes, neither of these implies that the genome has semantic properties like correctness or satisfaction conditions (Godfrey-<span class='Hi'>Smith</span> P. 2002. In: Wolenski J. and Kajania-Placek K. (eds), In the Scope (...)
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  26. David L. Wiesenthal & Neil I. Wiener (1996). Privacy and the Human Genome Project. Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):189 – 202.score: 12.0
    The Human Genome Project has raised many issues regarding the contributions of genetics to a variety of diseases and societal conditions. With genetic testing now easily conducted with lowered costs in nonmedical domains, a variety of privacy issues must be considered. Such testing will result in the loss of significant privacy rights for the individual. Society must now consider such issues as the ownership of genetic data, confidentiality rights to such information, limits placed on genetic screening, and legislation to (...)
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  27. Raphael Falk (2004). Long Live the Genome! So Should the Gene. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (1):105 - 121.score: 12.0
    Developments in the sequencing of whole genomes and in simultaneously surveying many thousands of transcription and translation products of specific cells have ushered in a conceptual revolution in genetics that rationally introduces top-down, holistic analyses. This emphasized the futility of attempts to reduce genes to structurally discrete entities along the genome, and the need to return to Johannsen's definition of a gene as 'something' that refers to an invariant entity of inheritance and development. We may view genes either as (...)
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  28. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Model Organisms as Models: Understanding the 'Lingua Franca' of the Human Genome Project. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S251-.score: 12.0
    Through an examination of the actual research strategies and assumptions underlying the Human Genome Project (HGP), it is argued that the epistemic basis of the initial model organism programs is not best understood as reasoning via causal analog models (CAMs). In order to answer a series of questions about what is being modeled and what claims about the models are warranted, a descriptive epistemological method is employed that uses historical techniques to develop detailed accounts which, in turn, help to (...)
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  29. Torbjörn Tännsjö (1993). Should We Change the Human Genome? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3).score: 12.0
    Should we change the human genome? The most general arguments against changing the human genome are here in focus. Distinctions are made between positive and negative gene therapy, between germ-line and somatic therapy, and between therapy where the intention is to benefit a particular individual (a future child) and where the intention is to benefit the human gene-pool.Some standard arguments against gene-therapy are dismissed. Negative somatic therapy is not controversial. Even negative, germ-line therapy is endorsed, if the intention (...)
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  30. Ruth Chadwick (2011). Personal Genomes: No Bad News? Bioethics 25 (2):62-65.score: 12.0
    Issues in genetics and genomics have been centre stage in Bioethics for much of its history, and have given rise to both negative and positive imagined futures. Ten years after the completion of the Human Genome Project, it is a good time to assess developments. The promise of whole genome sequencing of individuals requires reflection on personalization, genetic determinism, and privacy.
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  31. ProfPier Luigi Luisi, Human Genome and Human Destiny.score: 12.0
    This contribution will be organized in three parts conceptually linked to each other. The first one will concern the ancient question “what is life?” seen according to a modern systemic view, the second with evolution based on Darwinian natural selection, the third with the notion of “being human” in relation to our genome.
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  32. Gunther Witzany (2008). The Viral Origins of Telomeres and Telomerases and Their Important Role in Eukaryogenesis and Genome Maintenance. Biosemiotics 1 (2):191-206.score: 12.0
    Whereas telomeres protect terminal ends of linear chromosomes, telomerases identify natural chromosome ends, which differ from broken DNA and replicate telomeres. Although telomeres play a crucial role in the linear chromosome organization of eukaryotic cells, their molecular syntax most probably descended from an ancient retroviral competence. This indicates an early retroviral colonization of large double-stranded DNA viruses, which are putative ancestors of the eukaryotic nucleus. This contribution demonstrates an advantage of the biosemiotic approach towards our evolutionary understanding of telomeres, telomerases, (...)
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  33. Patrick Amar, Pascal Ballet, Georgia Barlovatz-Meimon, Arndt Benecke, Gilles Bernot, Yves Bouligand, Paul Bourguine, Franck Delaplace, Jean-Marc Delosme, Maurice Demarty, Itzhak Fishov, Jean Fourmentin-Guilbert, Joe Fralick, Jean-Louis Giavitto, Bernard Gleyse, Christophe Godin, Roberto Incitti, François Képès, Catherine Lange, Lois Le Sceller, Corinne Loutellier, Olivier Michel, Franck Molina, Chantal Monnier, René Natowicz, Vic Norris, Nicole Orange, Helene Pollard, Derek Raine, Camille Ripoll, Josette Rouviere-Yaniv, Milton Saier, Paul Soler, Pierre Tambourin, Michel Thellier, Philippe Tracqui, Dave Ussery, Jean-Claude Vincent, Jean-Pierre Vannier, Philippa Wiggins & Abdallah Zemirline (2002). Hyperstructures, Genome Analysis and I-Cells. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4).score: 12.0
    New concepts may prove necessary to profit from the avalanche of sequence data on the genome, transcriptome, proteome and interactome and to relate this information to cell physiology. Here, we focus on the concept of large activity-based structures, or hyperstructures, in which a variety of types of molecules are brought together to perform a function. We review the evidence for the existence of hyperstructures responsible for the initiation of DNA replication, the sequestration of newly replicated origins of replication, cell (...)
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  34. Eline Bunnik, Maartje Schermer & A. Cecile Janssens (2011). Personal Genome Testing: Test Characteristics to Clarify the Discourse on Ethical, Legal and Societal Issues. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):11-.score: 12.0
    Background: As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants (...)
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  35. Daniel Gibson, Benders G., A. Gwynedd, Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch, Evgeniya Denisova, Baden-Tillson A., Zaveri Holly, Stockwell Jayshree, B. Timothy, Anushka Brownley, David Thomas, Algire W., A. Mikkel, Chuck Merryman, Lei Young, Vladimir Noskov, Glass N., I. John, J. Craig Venter, Clyde Hutchison, Smith A. & O. Hamilton (2008). Complete Chemical Synthesis, Assembly, and Cloning of a Mycoplasma Genitalium Genome. Science 319 (5867):1215--1220.score: 12.0
    We have synthesized a 582,970-base pair Mycoplasma genitalium genome. This synthetic genome, named M. genitalium JCVI-1.0, contains all the genes of wild-type M. genitalium G37 except MG408, which was disrupted by an antibiotic marker to block pathogenicity and to allow for selection. To identify the genome as synthetic, we inserted "watermarks" at intergenic sites known to tolerate transposon insertions. Overlapping "cassettes" of 5 to 7 kilobases (kb), assembled from chemically synthesized oligonucleotides, were joined by in vitro recombination (...)
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  36. Gerd Richter & Matthew D. Bacchetta (1998). Interventions in the Human Genome: Some Moral and Ethical Considerations. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (3):303 – 317.score: 12.0
    In the debate regarding the different possibilities for gene therapy, it is presupposed that the manipulations are limited to the nuclear genome (nDNA). Given recent advances in genetics, mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and diseases must be considered as well. In this paper, we propose a three dimensional framework for the ethical debate of gene therapy where we add the genomic type (nDNA vs. mtDNA) as a third dimension to be considered beside the paradigmatic dimensions of target cell (somatic vs. (...)
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  37. Christian Byk (1992). The Human Genome Project and the Social Contract: A Law Policy Approach. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):371-380.score: 12.0
    For the first time in history, genetics will enable science to completely identify each human as genetically unique. Will this knowledge reinforce the trend for more individual liberties or will it create a ‘brave new world’? A law policy approach to the problems raised by the human genome project shows how far our democratic institutions are from being the proper forum to discuss such issues. Because of the fears and anxiety raised in the population, and also because of its (...)
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  38. Stephen Jay Gould, Humbled by the Genome's Mysteries.score: 12.0
    Two groups of researchers released the formal report of data for the human genome last Monday -- on the birthday of Charles Darwin, who jump-started our biological understanding of life's nature and evolution when he published ''The Origin of Species'' in 1859. On Tuesday, and for only the second time in 35 years of teaching, I dropped my intended schedule -- to discuss the importance of this work with my undergraduate course on the history of life. (The only other (...)
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  39. B. R. Jordan & D. F. C. Tsai (2010). Whole-Genome Association Studies for Multigenic Diseases: Ethical Dilemmas Arising From Commercialization--The Case of Genetic Testing for Autism. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):440-444.score: 12.0
    This paper examines some ethical issues arising from whole-genome association studies for multigenic diseases, focusing on the case of autism. Events occurring following the announcement of a genetic test for autism in France (2005–2009) are described to exemplify the ethical controversies that can arise when genetic testing for autism is applied prematurely and inappropriately promoted by biotech companies. The authors argue that genetic tests assessing one or a few genes involved in highly multigenic disorders can only be useful if: (...)
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  40. Philip Kitcher (1994). Who's Afraid of the Human Genome Project? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:313 - 321.score: 12.0
    There are a number of controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project (HGP). Some criticisms are based on the contention that the full human sequence will be scientifically worthless; others stem from short-term worries about the social impact of genetic testing and the release of genetic information about individuals. I argue that, properly understood, the HGP is a valuable scientific project with a misleading name, that the moral issues surrounding the short-term difficulties are relatively straightforward but that there (...)
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  41. Christian Byk (1998). A Map to a New Treasure Island: The Human Genome and the Concept of Common Heritage. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (3):234 – 246.score: 12.0
    While the 1970's have been called the environmental years, the 1990's could be seen as the genome years. As the challenge to map and to sequence the human genome mobilized the scientific community, risks and benefits of information and uses that would derive from this project have also raised ethical issues at the international level. The particular interest of the 1997 UNESCO Declaration relies on the fact that it emphasizes both the scientific importance of genetics and the appropriate (...)
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  42. Richard Sternberg (1996). The Role of Constrained Self-Organization in Genome Structural Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 44 (2).score: 12.0
    A hypothesis of genome structural evolution is explored. Rapid and cohesive alterations in genome organization are viewed as resulting from the dynamic and constrained interactions of chromosomal subsystem components. A combination of macromolecular boundary conditions and DNA element involvement in far-from-equilibrium reactions is proposed to increase the complexity of genomic subsystems via the channelling of genome turnover; interactions between subsystems create higher-order subsystems expanding the phase space for further genetic evolution. The operation of generic constraints on structuration (...)
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  43. Hub Zwart (2010). The Nobel Prize as a Reward Mechanism in the Genomics Era: Anonymous Researchers, Visible Managers and the Ethics of Excellence. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):299-312.score: 12.0
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is regarded by many as one of the major scientific achievements in recent science history, a large-scale endeavour that is changing the way in which biomedical research is done and expected, moreover, to yield considerable benefit for society. Thus, since the completion of the human genome sequencing effort, a debate has emerged over the question whether this effort merits to be awarded a Nobel Prize and if so, who should be the one(s) to (...)
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  44. Ruth Chadwick & Charles Ngwena (1995). The Human Genome Project, Predictive Testing and Insurance Contracts: Ethical and Legal Responses. [REVIEW] Res Publica 1 (2):115-129.score: 12.0
    The economic costs to the insurers of complementary routine genetic testing would outweigh the benefits. However, should testing technology in future be refined so as to produce a cheap and reliable test, there is no reason why insurers might not take up predictive testing as part of the normal underwriting process. It is this possibility which justifies formulating a pre-emptive policy. At the very least, there are reasons for promoting and protecting the welfare of the proposer so as to redress (...)
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  45. L. Gannett (2003). The Normal Genome in Twentieth-Century Evolutionary Thought. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):143-185.score: 12.0
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) has been criticised from an evolutionary perspective for three reasons: completely ignoring genetic variation; improperly treating either all or some genetic variation as deviation from a norm; and mistakenly seeking to define species in terms of essential properties possessed by all and only member organisms. The first claim is unfounded; the second and third claims are more on target. Nevertheless, it is a mistake to use the typological-population distinction to oppose molecular genetics and evolutionary (...)
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  46. David Morris (2012). Merleau-Ponty, Passivity, and Science. From Structure, Sense and Expression, to Life as Phenomenal Field, Via the Regulatory Genome. Chiasmi International 14:89-112.score: 12.0
    Merleau-Ponty, la passivité et la scienceJe soutiens qu’il y a plus en jeu dans l’intérêt de Merleau-Ponty pour la science qu’une simple dialectique entre disciplines. C’est parce que son évolutionméthodologique le conduit à trouver dans la science un moyen spécifique d’approfondir ses recherches ontologiques, que celle-ci hante de plus en plus sa philosophie. En effet, dans le chapitre « champ phénoménal » de la Phénoménologie de la perception, il est possible de rapprocher certains aspects de son défi méthodologique et l’idée (...)
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  47. Edward B. Flowers (1998). The Ethics and Economics of Patenting the Human Genome. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (15):1737-1745.score: 12.0
    This paper attempts to better define the areas of conflict and agreement between value ethics and the theoretical ethics of the market processes at work in the biotechnology industry. Despite the apparent lack of ethics in an oligopolistically competitive pharmaceuticals industry, the paper concludes that the current stage of development of the medical biotechnology subindustry offers unparalleled opportunities for ethical systems to influence the market-based development of biotechnology. Ethical conversations between doctors and biologists with ethicists can help the market absorb (...)
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  48. Amy McGuire, Christina Diaz, Tao Wang & Susan Hilsenbeck (2009). Social Networkers' Attitudes Toward Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6):3-10.score: 12.0
    Purpose: This study explores social networkers' interest in and attitudes toward personal genome testing (PGT), focusing on expectations related to the clinical integration of PGT results. Methods: An online survey of 1,087 social networking users was conducted to assess 1) use and interest in PGT; 2) attitudes toward PGT companies and test results; and 3) expectations for the clinical integration of PGT. Descriptive statistics were calculated to summarize respondents' characteristics and responses. Results: Six percent of respondents have used PGT, (...)
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  49. John A. Robertson (2003). The $1000 Genome: Ethical and Legal Issues in Whole Genome Sequencing of Individuals. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):35-42.score: 12.0
    Progress in gene sequencing could make rapid whole genome sequencing of individuals affordable to millions of persons and useful for many purposes in a future era of genomic medicine. Using the idea of $1000 genome as a focus, this article reviews the main technical, ethical, and legal issues that must be resolved to make mass genotyping of individuals cost-effective and ethically acceptable. It presents the case for individual ownership of a person's genome and its information, and shows (...)
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  50. Günther Witzany (2006). Natural Genome-Editing Competences of Viruses. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (4).score: 12.0
    It is becoming increasingly evident that the driving forces of evolutionary novelty are not randomly derived chance mutations of the genetic text, but a precise genome editing by omnipresent viral agents. These competences integrate the whole toolbox of natural genetic engineering, replication, transcription, translation, genomic imprinting, genomic creativity, enzymatic inventions and all types of genetic repair patterns. Even the non-coding, repetitive DNA sequences which were interpreted as being ancient remnants of former evolutionary stages are now recognized as being of (...)
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