Search results for 'Nancy Meyers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Diana T. Meyers (1994). Subjection & Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism & Moral Philosophy. Routledge.score: 150.0
    Subjection and Subjectivity offers an account of moral subjectivity and moral reflection designed to meet the needs of feminism, as well as other emancipatory movements. Diana Tietjens Meyers argues that impartial reason--the appraoch to moral reflection which has dominated 20th century Anglo-American philosophy and judicial reasoning--is inadequate for addressing real world injustices. Dealing with the problems of group-based social exclusion requires empathy with others. But empathy often becomes distorted by prejudicial attitudes which may be publicly condemned but continue to (...)
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  2. Alena Alexandrova & Jean-Luc Nancy (eds.) (2012). Re-Treating Religion: Deconstructing Christianity with Jean-Luc Nancy. Fordham University Press.score: 150.0
    Re-treating Religion is the first volume to analyze his long-term project The Deconstruction of Christianity,especially his major statement of it in Dis-Enclosure.Nancy conceives monotheistic religion and secularization not as opposite ...
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  3. Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan (2002). American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.score: 120.0
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  4. Jacques Derrida, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe & Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). Dialogue entre Jacques Derrida, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe et Jean-Luc Nancy. Rue Descartes 52 (2):86-99.score: 120.0
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  5. Jean-luc Nancy & Véronique Fabbri (2004). Entretien avec Jean-Luc Nancy. Rue Descartes 44 (2):62-79.score: 120.0
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  6. Ugo Perone & Jean-Luc Nancy (eds.) (2012). Intorno a Jean-Luc Nancy. Rosenberg & Sellier.score: 120.0
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  7. Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). The Being-with of Being-There. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):1-15.score: 60.0
    In Being and Time, Heidegger affirms that being-with or Mitsein is an essential constitution of Dasein but he does not submit this existential to the same rigorous analyses as other existentials. In this essay, Jean-Luc Nancy points to the different places where Heidegger erased the possibility of thinking an essential with that he himself opened. This erasure is due, according to Nancy, to the subordination of Mitsein to a thinking of the proper and the improper. The polarization of (...)
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  8. Diana Meyers, Part 2.4: Autonomy Competency.score: 60.0
    Part II. Section 4. Autonomy Competency: Meyers takes John Rawls to task for giving a superficial account of autonomy. Endorsing deliberative rationality, he furnishes no account of how to achieve it. Meyers argues that her conception of autonomy competency fills the gap in Rawls's theory. Moreover, it is compatible with the emotional bonds of a relational self, and, acknowledging human fallibility, it provides an account of how autonomous people can recognize and correct their missteps. In the context of (...)
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  9. Diana Meyers, Personal Autonomy and Related Concepts.score: 60.0
    Part I. The book begins with literary, cinematic, and historical scenarios that exemplify personal autonomy. Meyers uses these vignettes to distinguish personal autonomy from other, variously related types of autonomy and to show that other kinds of autonomy cannot adequately address the concern people have with their own personal decisions. Noting how profoundly social experience impinges on self-discovery, self-definition, and self-direction, Meyers characterizes autonomous individuals as persons who do what they really want, and she undertakes to supply an (...)
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  10. Diana Meyers, Part 4.2: Self-Respect and Autonomy.score: 60.0
    Part IV. Section 2. Self-Respect and Autonomy: Meyers's discussion of self-respect takes into account work by Stephen Darwall, Thomas Hill, Jr., and Stephen Massey and proposes a unified triadic account that undermines the distinction between self-respect and self-esteem. After distinguishing compromised respect from unqualified respect, she shows why self-respect is both required for and a product of exercising autonomy competency.
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  11. Diana Meyers, Part 2.1: Recent Accounts of Autonomy.score: 60.0
    Part II. Section 1. Recent Accounts of Autonomy: Emphasizing the problematic relationship between autonomy and socialization, Meyers explores prominent views of autonomy, including Robert Young's, Stanley Benn's, Harry Frankfurt's, Gerald Dworkin's, and Gary Watson's. Having identified three main models for "rescuing autonomy from socialization," she identifies a single defect underlying all of them - namely, their assumption that personal autonomy requires transcending socialization through free will.
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  12. Diana Meyers, Part 3.3: Autonomy and Feminine Socialization.score: 60.0
    Part III. Section 3. Autonomy and Feminine Socialization: Having agreed with Beauvoir that narcissism and altruism contribute to women's lack of autonomy, Meyers examines Beauvoir's account of autonomy in light of her own conception of autonomy competency and argues that Beauvoir's conception of autonomy is too stringent. Autonomy competency, in contrast, allows for degrees of autonomy and variations in degree as viewed over a life-time, as well as for a distinction between programmatic and episodic autonomy. Meyers concludes by (...)
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  13. Diana Meyers, Part 2.2 an Alternative Account of Autonomy.score: 60.0
    Contrasting ontological accounts of autonomy with procedural accounts, Meyers defends the procedural model. For Meyers, the key question for a theory of autonomy is how people make decisions. She introduces the idea of autonomy competency - a repertoire of coordinated skills that make self-discovery, self-definition, and self-direction and hence autonomy possible. The authentic self is a self that has some degree of proficiency with respect to this competency and that emerges and evolves through the exercise of this competency. (...)
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  14. Diana Meyers, Part 4.1: The Personal and Political Value of Autonomy.score: 60.0
    Part IV. Section 1. The Personal and the Political Value of Autonomy: Disparities in autonomy competency number among the many ways in which women and men in western societies are unequal. Meyers holds that although personal autonomy is not the sole or paramount value, medial autonomy is not only a personal good, but is also a political good.
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  15. Diana Meyers, Part 3.1 Theories of Socialization.score: 60.0
    Part III. Section 1. Theories of Socialization. Autonomy as autonomy competency acknowledges the necessity of socialization for autonomy. Preliminary to considering this claim in relation to gender, Meyers sketches three social scientific models of socialization - psychoanalysis, social learning, and cognitive development.
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  16. Diana Meyers, Part 3.2: Feminine and Masculine Socialization.score: 60.0
    Part III. Section 2. Feminine and Masculine Socialization: Two main problems are explored: 1) How are girls and boys socialized in contemporary western societies? and 2) What are adult women and men like? Meyers appropriates the main outlines of Simone de Beauvoir's account of feminine socialization in The Second Sex, but she also discusses more recent research.
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  17. Diana Meyers, Part 2.5: Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy.score: 60.0
    Part II. Section 5. Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy: Two questions drive this chapter: 1) What kinds of things can be objects of autonomous choices? and 2) How are these related to an individual's authentic self? If self-interest is construed as securing a set of basic goods for oneself, personal autonomy and self-interest can collide. Still, Meyers holds that autonomy based on exercising autonomy competency is compatible with the dominance principle, which counsels opting for a course of action that satisfies (...)
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  18. Jean-Luc Nancy (2000). Being Singular Plural. Stanford University Press.score: 60.0
    One of the strongest strands in Nancy's philosophy is an attempt to rethink community and the very idea of the social in a way that does not ground these ideas in some individual subject or subjectivity. The fundamental argument of this book is that being is always 'being with', that 'I' is not prior to 'we', that existence is essentially co-existence. He thinks this being together, not as a comfortable enclosure in a pre-existing group, but as a mutual abandonment (...)
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  19. Jean-Luc Nancy (2005). The Ground of the Image. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    If anything marks the image, it is a deep ambivalence. Denounced as superficial, illusory, and groundless, images are at the same time attributed with exorbitant power and assigned a privileged relation to truth. Mistrusted by philosophy, forbidden and embraced by religions, manipulated as “spectacle” and proliferated in the media, images never cease to present their multiple aspects, their paradoxes, their flat but receding spaces.What is this power that lies in the depths and recesses of an image—which is always only an (...)
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  20. Diana Meyers, Part 3.5: Autonomy-Enhancing Socialization.score: 60.0
    Part III. Section 5. Autonomy-Enhancing Socialization: Meyers seeks a remedy for gendered inequality with respect to autonomy in processes of socialization. After critically examining proposals offered by Beauvoir, Chodorow, and Radcliffe Richards, Meyers describes a pedagogical model that fosters assertiveness and intimacy while avoiding the inculcation of aggression and that actively nurtures the development of autonomy skills.
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  21. David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.score: 60.0
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  22. Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). Multiple Arts: The Muses Ii. Stanford University Press.score: 60.0
    This collection of writings by Jean-Luc Nancy, the renowned French critic and poet, delves into the history of philosophy to locate a fundamentally poetic modus operandi there. The book represents a daring mixture of Nancy’s philosophical essays, writings about artworks, and artwork of his own. With theoretical rigor, Nancy elaborates on the intrinsic multiplicity of art as a concept of “making,” and outlines the tensions inherent in the faire, the “making” that characterizes the very process of production (...)
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  23. Diana Meyers, Part 2.3 Self-Direction and Personal Integration.score: 60.0
    Because it is characteristic of competencies that they have overarching functions, Meyers considers what the overarching function of autonomy competency might be. She defends a view of personal integration that does not entail counterproductive consistency or unity. She rejects several other solutions to this problem, including compartmentalization, sanity, happiness, and eccentric nonconformity.
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  24. Diana Meyers, Part 2.6: Responsibility for Self.score: 60.0
    Part II. Section 6. Responsibility for Self: Meyers criticizes Derek Parfit's arguments against the rationality of temporal neutrality -- in other words, the principle of responsibility to self. She urges that autonomy requires providing for one's future.
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  25. Diana T. Meyers (1992). Personal Autonomy or the Deconstructed Subject? A Reply to Hekman. Hypatia 7 (1):124 - 132.score: 60.0
    A response to Susan Hekman's article "Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism" and to her review of Diana T. Meyers' book Self, Society, and Personal Choice both of which appeared in Hypatia 6(2).
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  26. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2002). Gender in the Mirror: Cultural Imagery and Women's Agency. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    The cultural imagery of women is deeply ingrained in our consciousness. So deeply, in fact, that feminists see this as a fundamental threat to female autonomy because it enshrines procreative heterosexuality as well as the relations of domination and subordination between men and women. Diana Meyers' book is about this cultural imagery - and how, once it is internalized, it shapes perception, reflection, judgement, and desire. These intergral images have a deep impact not only on the individual psyche, but (...)
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  27. Diana T. Meyers (2014). Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Diana Tietjens Meyers examines the political underpinnings of psychoanalytic feminism, analyzing the relation between the nature of the self and the structure of good societies. She argues that impartial reason--the approach to moral reflection which has dominated 20th-century Anglo-American philosophy--is inadequate for addressing real world injustices. Subjection and Subjectivity is central to feminist thought across a wide range of disciplines.
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  28. Jean-Luc Nancy (2013). Adoration. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    Adoration is the second volume of the Deconstruction of Christianity, following Dis-Enclosure. The first volume attempted to demonstrate why it is necessary to open reason up not to a religious dimension but to one transcending reason as we have been accustomed to understanding it; the term "adoration" attempts to name the gesture of this dis-enclosed reason. -/- Adoration causes us to receive ignorance as truth: not a feigned ignorance, perhaps not even a "nonknowledge," nothing that would attempt to justify the (...)
     
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  29. Jean Luc Nancy & Moreno Romo (2013). El espíritu existe de manera plural. Escritos 21 (47):395-418.score: 60.0
    Los autores conversan sobre la distinta relación que tienen con la filosofía las lenguas española y francesa, encontrando la explicación de esa diferencia principalmente en los “espíritus” que nos separan, no obstante nuestra considerable cercanía lingüística. Mientras que la Reforma y la Contrarreforma exigieron de Francia un “humanismo del saber objetivo, del individuo y del progreso”, la cultura española dio de sí “un paradójico humanismo de la fe, de la expansión y de los juegos de la apariencia”. El “espíritu de (...)
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  30. Jean Luc Nancy & Juan Carlos Moreno Romo (2013). El espíritu existe de manera plural. Escritos 21 (47):395-418.score: 60.0
    Los autores conversan sobre la distinta relación que tienen con la filosofía las lenguas española y francesa, encontrando la explicación de esa diferencia principalmente en los “espíritus” que nos separan, no obstante nuestra considerable cercanía lingüística. Mientras que la Reforma y la Contrarreforma exigieron de Francia un “humanismo del saber objetivo, del individuo y del progreso”, la cultura española dio de sí “un paradójico humanismo de la fe, de la expansión y de los juegos de la apariencia”. El “espíritu de (...)
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  31. Jean-Luc Nancy (2007). The Creation of the World or Globalization. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Appearing in English for the first time, Jean-Luc Nancy’s 2002 book reflects on globalization and its impact on our being-in-the-world. Developing a contrast in the French language between two terms that are usually synonymous, or that are used interchangeably, namely globalisation (globalization) and mondialisation (world-forming), Nancy undertakes a rethinking of what “world-forming” might mean. At stake in this distinction is for him nothing less than two possible destinies of our humanity, and of our time. On the one hand, (...)
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  32. Jean-Luc Nancy (1996). The Muses. Stanford University Press.score: 60.0
    This collection, by one of the most challenging of contemporary thinkers, asks the question: why are there several arts and not just one? This question focuses on the point of maximal tension between the philosophical tradition and contemporary thinking about the arts: the relation between the plurality of the human senses and sense or meaning in general. Throughout the five essays, Nancy's argument hinges on the culminating formulation of this relation in Hegel's Aesthetics and The Phenomenology of Spirit - (...)
     
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  33. Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). The Sense of the World. Univ of Minnesota Press.score: 60.0
    An essential exploration of sense and meaning. -/- Is there a “world” anymore, let alone any “sense” to it? Acknowledging the lack of meaning in our time, and the lack of a world at the center of meanings we try to impose, Jean-Luc Nancy presents a rigorous critique of the many discourses-from philosophy and political science to psychoanalysis and art history-that talk and write their way around these gaping absences in our lives. -/- In an original style befitting his (...)
     
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  34. Jean-Luc Nancy (2001). The Speculative Remark: One of Hegel's Bons Mots. Stanford University Press.score: 60.0
    This work, by two of the most innovative and challenging of contemporary thinkers, pivots on a Remark added by Hegel in 1831 to the second edition of his Science of Logic. As a model of close reading applied both to philosophical texts and the making of philosophical systems, The Speculative Remark played a significant role in transforming the practice of philosophy away from system building to analysis of specific linguistic detail, with meticulous attention to etymological, philological, and rhetorical nuance. The (...)
     
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  35. Chris Meyers (2005). Wants and Desires: A Critique of Conativist Theory of Motivation. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:357-370.score: 30.0
    In this paper I will argue against the Humean theory of motivation, or “conativism” which claims that all actions are ultimately generated by desires. Conativism is supported by (1) a behavioral analysis of desire as a disposition to act in certain ways, and (2) the difference between belief and desire in terms of their different “direction of fi t” with the world. I will show that this behavioral account of desire cannot provide an adequate explanation of action. Mere disposition to (...)
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  36. Diana T. Meyers (2005). Who's There? Selfhood, Self-Regard, and Social Relations. Hypatia 20 (4):200-215.score: 30.0
    : J. David Velleman develops a canny, albeit mentalistic, theory of selfhood that furnishes some insights feminist philosophers should heed but that does not adequately heed some of the insights feminist philosophers have developed about the embodiment and relationality of the self. In my view, reflexivity cannot do the whole job of accounting for selfhood, for it rests on an unduly sharp distinction between reflexive loci of understanding and value, on the one hand, and embodiment and relationality, on the other. (...)
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  37. Peggy J. Bowers, Christopher Meyers & Anantha Babbili (2004). Power, Ethics, and Journalism: Toward an Integrative Approach. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):223 – 246.score: 30.0
    Although we think 1 of the basic purposes of journalism is to provide information vital to enhancing citizen autonomy, we also see this goal as being in direct tension with the power news media hold and wield, power that may serve to undercut, rather than enhance, citizen autonomy. We argue that the news media are ethically constrained by proceduralism, resulting in journalists asserting power inappropriately at the individual level, and unwittingly surrendering moral authority institutionally and globally. Anonymity, institutionalization, and routinization (...)
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  38. R. C. Meyers (1971). A Note on Sense-Data and Depth Perception. Mind 80 (July):437-440.score: 30.0
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  39. Michael Davis, Christopher Meyers, Lisa H. Newton & Elliot D. Cohen (2004). Report Cards. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):161 – 165.score: 30.0
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  40. Dennis E. Garrett, Jeffrey L. Bradford, Renee A. Meyers & Joy Becker (1989). Issues Management and Organizational Accounts: An Analysis of Corporate Responses to Accusations of Unethical Business Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):507 - 520.score: 30.0
    When external groups accuse a business organization of unethical practices, managers of the accused organization usually offer a communicative response to attempt to protect their organization's public image. Even though many researchers readily concur that analysis of these communicative responses is important to our understanding of business and society conflict, few investigations have focused on developing a theoretical framework for analyzing these communicative strategies used by managers. In addition, research in this area has suffered from a lack of empirical investigation. (...)
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  41. Christopher Meyers (2007). Clinical Ethics Consulting and Conflict of Interest: Structurally Intertwined. Hastings Center Report 37 (2):32-40.score: 30.0
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  42. Diana T. Meyers (2005). Women Philosophers, Sidelined Challenges, and Professional Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):149-152.score: 30.0
  43. Richard H. Popkin & Robert G. Meyers (1993). Early Influences on Peirce: A Letter to Samuel Barnett. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):607-621.score: 30.0
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  44. Chris Meyers (2004). Wrongful Beneficence: Exploitation and Third World Sweatshops. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):319–333.score: 20.0
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  45. Robert G. Meyers & Kenneth Stern (1973). Knowledge Without Paradox. Journal of Philosophy 70 (6):147-160.score: 20.0
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  46. C. D. Meyers (2007). Moral Duty, Individual Responsibility, and Sweatshop Exploitation. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):620–626.score: 20.0
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  47. C. D. Meyers (2008). The Virtue of Cold-Heartedness. Philosophical Studies 138 (2):233 - 244.score: 20.0
    I defend a strong version of the Kantian claim that actions done solely from duty have moral worth by (1) considering pure cases of acting from duty, (2) showing that love and sympathy, unlike a sense of duty, can often lead us to do the wrong thing, (3) carefully distinguishing moral from non-moral virtues, and (4) by distinguishing pathological sympathy from practical sympathy. Not only is acting purely from a sense of duty superior to acting from love and sympathetic feelings, (...)
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  48. Diana T. Meyers (1987). Personal Autonomy and the Paradox of Feminine Socialization. Journal of Philosophy 84 (11):619-628.score: 20.0
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  49. Christopher Meyers (2003). Appreciating W. D. Ross:On Duties and Consequences. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (2):81 – 97.score: 20.0
    In this article I describe the theoretical underpinnings of 20th-century British philosopher W. D. Ross's approach to linking deontological and teleological decision making. I attempt to fill in what Ross left on the whole unanswered, that is, how to use his duties to resolve dilemmas. A case study in journalism demonstrates how to apply the theory. I conclude with an analysis of what I take to be the strengths and weaknesses in Ross's theory.
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  50. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2003). Frontiers of Individuality: Embodiment and Relationships in Cultural Context. History and Theory 42 (2):271–285.score: 20.0
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