Search results for 'tracking theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ben Bronner (2012). Problems with the Dispositional Tracking Theory of Knowledge. Logos and Episteme 3 (3):505-507.score: 240.0
    Rachael Briggs and Daniel Nolan attempt to improve on Nozick’s tracking theory of knowledge by providing a modified, dispositional tracking theory. The dispositional theory, however, faces more problems than those previously noted by John Turri. First, it is not simply that satisfaction of the theory’s conditions is unnecessary for knowledge – it is insufficient as well. Second, in one important respect, the dispositional theory is a step backwards relative to the original tracking (...)
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  2. Nicolas J. Bullot (forthcoming). Agent Tracking: A Psycho-Historical Theory of the Identification of Living and Social Agents. Biology and Philosophy:1-24.score: 192.0
    To explain agent-identification behaviours, universalist theories in the biological and cognitive sciences have posited mental mechanisms thought to be universal to all humans, such as agent detection and face recognition mechanisms. These universalist theories have paid little attention to how particular sociocultural or historical contexts interact with the psychobiological processes of agent-identification. In contrast to universalist theories, contextualist theories appeal to particular historical and sociocultural contexts for explaining agent-identification. Contextualist theories tend to adopt idiographic methods aimed at recording the heterogeneity (...)
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  3. Francesca Happé & Eva Loth (2002). 'Theory of Mind' and Tracking Speakers' Intentions. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):24–36.score: 120.0
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  4. Nicolas Bullot (2009). Toward a Theory of the Empirical Tracking of Individuals: Cognitive Flexibility and the Functions of Attention in Integrated Tracking. Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):353-387.score: 120.0
  5. Francesca Happe & Eva Loth (2002). 'Theory of Mind' and Tracking Speakers' Intentions. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):24-36.score: 120.0
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  6. Benjamin E. Hilbig Andreas Glöckner, Susann Fiedler, Guy Hochman, Shahar Ayal (2012). Processing Differences Between Descriptions and Experience: A Comparative Analysis Using Eye-Tracking and Physiological Measures. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 102.0
    Do decisions from description and from experience trigger different cognitive processes? We investigated this general question using cognitive modeling, eye-tracking, and physiological arousal measures. Three novel findings indeed suggest qualitatively different processes between the two types of decisions. First, comparative modeling indicates that evidence accumulation models assuming averaging of all fixation-sampled outcomes predict choices best in decisions from experience, whereas Cumulative Prospect Theory predicts choices best in decisions from descriptions. Second, arousal decreased with increasing difference in expected value (...)
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  7. Fred Adams & Murray Clarke (2007). Defending the Tracking Theories of Knowledge. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:3-8.score: 100.0
    Since Kripke's attack on Nozick's Tracking Theory of knowledge, there has been strong suspicion that tracking theories are false. We think that neither Kripke's arguments and examples nor other recent attacks in the literature show that the tracking theories are false. We cannot address all of these concerns here, but we will show why some of the most discussed examples from Kripke do not demonstrate that the tracking theories are false.
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  8. Angela Mendelovici & David Bourget (2014). Naturalizing Intentionality: Tracking Theories Versus Phenomenal Intentionality Theories. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):325-337.score: 96.0
    This paper compares tracking and phenomenal intentionality theories of intentionality with respect to the issue of naturalism. Tracking theories explicitly aim to naturalize intentionality, while phenomenal intentionality theories generally do not. It might seem that considerations of naturalism count in favor of tracking theories. We survey key considerations relevant to this claim, including some motivations for and objections to the two kinds of theories. We conclude by suggesting that naturalistic considerations may in fact support phenomenal intentionality theories (...)
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  9. Andreas Glöckner Susann Fiedler (2012). The Dynamics of Decision Making in Risky Choice: An Eye-Tracking Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 84.0
    In the last years, research on risky choice has moved beyond analyzing choices only. Models have been suggested that aim to describe the underlying cognitive processes and some studies have tested process predictions of these models. Prominent approaches are evidence accumulation models such as Decision Field Theory (DFT), simple serial heuristic models such as the Adaptive Toolbox, and connectionist approaches such as the Parallel Constraint Satisfaction Model (PCS). In two studies involving measures of attention and pupil dilation, we investigate (...)
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  10. Sherrilyn Roush (2007). Tracking Truth: Knowledge, Evidence, and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Sherrilyn Roush defends a new theory of knowledge and evidence, based on the idea of "tracking" the truth, as the best approach to a wide range of questions about knowledge-related phenomena. The theory explains, for example, why scepticism is frustrating, why knowledge is power, and why better evidence makes you more likely to have knowledge. Tracking Truth provides a unification of the concepts of knowledge and evidence, and argues against traditional epistemological realist and anti-realist positions about (...)
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  11. James Griesemer (2006). Theoretical Integration, Cooperation, and Theories as Tracking Devices. Biological Theory 1 (1):4-7.score: 66.0
  12. Andreas Roepstorff Kristian Tylén, Micah Allen, Bjørk K. Hunter (2012). Interaction Vs. Observation: Distinctive Modes of Social Cognition in Human Brain and Behavior? A Combined fMRI and Eye-Tracking Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We (...)
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  13. D. Schneider, V. P. Slaughter, A. P. Bayliss & P. E. Dux (2013). A Temporally Sustained Implicit Theory of Mind Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Cognition 129 (2):410-417.score: 66.0
    Eye movements during false-belief tasks can reveal an individual's capacity to implicitly monitor others' mental states (theory of mind - ToM). It has been suggested, based on the results of a single-trial-experiment, that this ability is impaired in those with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite neurotypical-like performance on explicit ToM measures. However, given there are known attention differences and visual hypersensitivities in ASD it is important to establish whether such impairments are evident over time. In addition, investigating (...)
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  14. Nicolas J. Bullot (2014). Explaining Person Identification: An Inquiry Into the Tracking of Human Agents. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3).score: 66.0
    To introduce the issue of the tracking and identification of human agents, I examine the ability of an agent (“a tracker”) to track a human person (“a target”) and distinguish this target from other individuals: The ability to perform person identification. First, I discuss influential mechanistic models of the perceptual recognition of human faces and people (the face-recognition program). Such models propose detailed hypotheses about the parts and activities of the mental mechanisms that control the perceptual recognition of persons. (...)
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  15. Audun Stolpe (2010). Norm-System Revision: Theory and Application. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (3):247-283.score: 66.0
    This paper generalises classical revision theory of the AGM brand to sets of norms. This is achieved substituting input/output logic for classical logic and tracking the changes. Operations of derogation and amendment—analogues of contraction and revision—are defined and characterised, and the precise relationship between contraction and derogation, on the one hand, and derogation and amendment on the other, is established. It is argued that the notion of derogation, in particular, is a very important analytical tool, and that even (...)
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  16. Angela Mendelovici (2013). Reliable Misrepresentation and Tracking Theories of Mental Representation. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):421-443.score: 64.0
    It is a live possibility that certain of our experiences reliably misrepresent the world around us. I argue that tracking theories of mental representation (e.g. those of Dretske, Fodor, and Millikan) have difficulty allowing for this possibility, and that this is a major consideration against them.
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  17. Saul A. Kripke (2011). Nozick on Knowledge. In , Philosophical Troubles. Collected Papers Vol I. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
  18. Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan (2012). Epistemic Dispositions. Logos and Episteme 3 (4):629-636.score: 60.0
  19. Lars Gundersen (2010). Tracking, Epistemic Dispositions and the Conditional Analysis. Erkenntnis 72 (3):353 - 364.score: 60.0
    According to Nozick’s tracking theory of knowledge, an agent a knows that p just in case her belief that p is true and also satisfies the two tracking conditionals that had p been false, she would not have believed that p , and had p been true under slightly different circumstances, she would still have believed that p . In this paper I wish to highlight an interesting but generally ignored feature of this theory: namely that (...)
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  20. Colin Klein (2011). The Dual Track Theory of Moral Decision-Making: A Critique of the Neuroimaging Evidence. Neuroethics 4 (2):143-162.score: 60.0
    The dual-track theory of moral reasoning has received considerable attention due to the neuroimaging work of Greene et al. Greene et al. claimed that certain kinds of moral dilemmas activated brain regions specific to emotional responses, while others activated areas specific to cognition. This appears to indicate a dissociation between different types of moral reasoning. I re-evaluate these claims of specificity in light of subsequent empirical work. I argue that none of the cortical areas identified by Greene et al. (...)
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  21. Fred Adams & Murray Clarke (2005). Resurrecting the Tracking Theories. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):207 – 221.score: 60.0
    Much of contemporary epistemology proceeds on the assumption that tracking theories of knowledge, such as those of Dretske and Nozick, are dead. The word on the street is that Kripke and others killed these theories with their counterexamples, and that epistemology must move in a new direction as a result. In this paper we defend the tracking theories against purportedly deadly objections. We detect life in the tracking theories, despite what we perceive to be a premature burial.
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  22. Fred Adams (2005). Tracking Theories of Knowledge. Veritas 50 (4):1-35.score: 60.0
    As teorias epistemológicas do rastreamento sustentam que o conhecimento é uma relação real entre o agente cognitivo e seu ambiente. Os estados cognitivos de um agente epistêmico fazem o rastreamento da verdade das proposições que são objeto de conhecimento ao embasarem a crença em indicadores confiáveis da verdade (evidência, razões, ou métodos de formação de crença). A novidade nessa abordagem é que se dá pouca ênfase no tipo de justificação epistêmica voltada ao fornecimento de procedimentos de decisão doxástica ou regras (...)
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  23. Robert M. Gottsdanker (1952). The Accuracy of Prediction Motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (1):26.score: 60.0
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  24. Joseph Salerno, Truth-Tracking and the Problem of Reflective Knowledge.score: 56.0
    In “Reliabilism Leveled” Jonathan Vogel (2000) provides a strong case against epistemic theories that stress the importance of tracking/sensitivity conditions. A tracking/sensitivity condition is to be understood as some version of the following counterfactual: (T) ~p oÆ ~Bp (T) says that s would not believe p, if p were false. Among other things, tracking is supposed to express the external relation that explains why some justified true beliefs are not knowledge. Champions of the condition include Robert Nozick (...)
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  25. Alvin I. Goldman (2009). Recursive Tracking Versus Process Reliabilism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):223-230.score: 54.0
    Sherrilyn Roush’s Tracking Truth (2005) is an impressive, precisioncrafted work. Although it sets out to rehabilitate the epistemological theory of Robert Nozick’s Philosophical Explanations (1981), its departures from Nozick’s line are extensive and original enough that it should be regarded as a distinct form of epistemological externalism. Roush’s mission is to develop an externalism that averts the problems and counterexamples encountered not only by Nozick’s theory but by other varieties of externalism as well. Roush advances both a (...)
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  26. William F. Harms (1998). The Use of Information Theory in Epistemology. Philosophy of Science 65 (3):472-501.score: 54.0
    Information theory offers a measure of "mutual information" which provides an appropriate measure of tracking efficiency for the naturalistic epistemologist. The statistical entropy on which it is based is arguably the best way of characterizing the uncertainty associated with the behavior of a system, and it is ontologically neutral. Though not appropriate for the naturalization of meaning, mutual information can serve as a measure of epistemic success independent of semantic maps and payoff structures. While not containing payoffs as (...)
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  27. Margus Vihalem (2011). What is 'the Subject' the Name For? The Conceptual Structure of Alain Badiou's Theory of the Subject. Sign Systems Studies 39 (1):60-79.score: 54.0
    The present paper outlines some basic concepts of Alain Badiou’s philosophy of the subject, tracking down its inherent and complex philosophical implications. These implications are made explicit in the criticism directed against the philosophical sophistry which denies the pertinence of the concept of truth. Badiou’s philosophical innovation is based on three nodal concepts, namely truth, event and subject, and it must be revealed how the afore-mentioned concepts areorganized and interrelated, eventually leading to reformulating the concept of the subject. In (...)
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  28. Thomas C. Vinci (1988). Objective Chance, Indicative Conditionals and Decision Theory; or, How You Can Be Smart, Rich and Keep on Smoking. Synthese 75 (1):83 - 105.score: 54.0
    In this paper I explore a version of standard (expected utility) decision theory in which the probability parameter is interpreted as an objective chance believed by agents to obtain and values of this parameter are fixed by indicative conditionals linking possible actions with possible outcomes. After reviewing some recent developments centering on the common-cause counterexamples to the standard approach, I introduce and briefly discuss the key notions in my own approach. (This approach has essentially the same results as the (...)
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  29. Zenon Pylyshyn, Some Puzzling Findings in Multiple Object Tracking (MOT): II. Inhibition of Moving Nontargets.score: 54.0
    We present three studies examining whether multiple-object tracking (MOT) benefits from the active inhibition of nontargets, as proposed in (Pylyshyn, 2004). Using a probedot technique, the first study showed poorer probe detection on nontargets than on either the targets being tracked or in the empty space between objects. The second study used a matching nontracking task to control for possible masking of probes, independent of target tracking. The third study examined how localized the inhibition is to individual nontargets. (...)
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  30. Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith (2006). Referent Tracking for Treatment Optimisation in Schizophrenic Patients. Journal of Web Semantics 4 (3):229-236.score: 54.0
    The IPAP Schizophrenia Algorithm was originally designed in the form of a flow chart to help physicians optimise the treatment of schizophrenic patients. We examined the current version from the perspective of recent work on terminologies and ontologies thereby drawing on the resources of Basic Formal Ontology, and this with the objective to make the algorithm appropriate for Semantic Web applications. We found that Basic Formal Ontology is a rich enough theory to represent all the entities involved and that (...)
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  31. Zenon Pylyshyn, Can Indexes Be Voluntarily Assigned in Multiple Object Tracking?score: 54.0
    In Multiple Object Tracking (MOT), an observer is able to track 4 – 5 objects in a group of otherwise indistinguishable objects that move independently and unpredictably about a display. According to the Visual Indexing Theory (Pylyshyn, 1989), successful tracking requires that target objects be indexed while they are distinct -- before tracking begins. In the typical MOT task, the target objects are briefly flashed resulting in the automatic assignment of indexes. The question arises whether indexes (...)
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  32. Z. W. Pylyshyn, Dynamics of Target Selection in Multiple Object Tracking (MOT).score: 54.0
    ��In four experiments we address the question whether several visual objects can be selected voluntarily (exogenously) and then tracked in a Multiple Object Tracking paradigm and, if so, whether the selection involves a different process. Experiment 1 showed that items can indeed be selected based on their labels. Experiment 2 showed that to select the complement set to a set that is automatically (exogenously) selected — e.g. to select all objects not flashed — observers require additional time and that (...)
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  33. Itay Shani (2011). Aim That Bow! An Interactivist Gaze at the Problem of Intentional Tracking. Axiomathes 21 (1):67-97.score: 48.0
    In this essay I offer a theory of the outward directedness of intentional states, namely, an account of what makes intentional states directed at their respective intentional objects. The theory is meant to be complementary to the canonical interactivist account of mental content in that the latter emphasizes the predicative, intensional, and internal aspects of representation whereas here I shall focus on its denotative, extensional, and external aspects. Thus, the aim is to establish that the two projects are (...)
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  34. Werner Ceusters, Peter Elkin & Barry Smith (2006). Referent Tracking: The Problem of Negative Findings. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 124:741-46.score: 48.0
    The paradigm of referent tracking is based on a realist presupposition which rejects so-called negative entities (congenital absent nipple, and the like) as spurious. How, then, can a referent tracking-based Electronic Health Record deal with what are standardly called ‘negative findings’? To answer this question we carried out an analysis of some 748 sentences drawn from patient charts and containing some form of negation. Our analysis shows that to deal with these sentences we need to introduce a new (...)
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  35. Jeffrey T. Runner, Rachel S. Sussman & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2006). Processing Reflexives and Pronouns in Picture Noun Phrase. Cognitive Science 30 (2):193-241.score: 48.0
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  36. Hanna S. Gauvin, Robert J. Hartsuiker & Falk Huettig (2013). Speech Monitoring and Phonologically-Mediated Eye Gaze in Language Perception and Production: A Comparison Using Printed Word Eye-Tracking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
  37. Vera Demberg & Frank Keller (2008). Data From Eye-Tracking Corpora as Evidence for Theories of Syntactic Processing Complexity. Cognition 109 (2):193-210.score: 40.0
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  38. Núñez Maria (2008). Looking at Theory-of-Mind 'on-Line': A New Procedure to Track Mental State Inferences in Young Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 40.0
  39. Ines Langemeyer & Wolf-Michael Roth (2006). Is Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Threatened to Fall Short of its Own Principles and Possibilities as a Dialectical Social Science? Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (2):20-42.score: 38.0
    In recent years, many researchers engaged in diverse areas and approaches of “cultural-historical activity theory” (CHAT) realized an increasing international interest in Lev S. Vygotsky’s, A. N. Leont’ev’s, and A. Luria’s work and its continuations. Not so long ago, Yrjö Engeström noted that the activity approach was still “the best-held secret of academia” (p. 64) and highlighted the “impressive dimension of theorizing behind” it. Certainly, this remark reflects a time when CHAT was off the beaten tracks. But if this (...)
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  40. Almo Farina (2012). A Biosemiotic Perspective of the Resource Criterion: Toward a General Theory of Resources. Biosemiotics 5 (1):17-32.score: 38.0
    Describing resources and their relationships with organisms seems to be a useful approach to a ‘unified ecology’, contributing to fill the gap between natural and human oriented processes, and opening new perspectives in dealing with biological complexity. This Resource Criterion defines the main properties of resources, describes the mechanisms that link them to individual species, and gives a particular emphasis to the biosemiotic approach that allows resources to be identified inside a heterogeneous ecological medium adopting the eco-field model. In particular, (...)
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  41. Richard W. Paul (1989). Critical Thinking in North America: A New Theory of Knowledge, Learning, and Literacy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (2):197-235.score: 38.0
    The pace of change in the world is accelerating, yet educational institutions have not kept pace. Indeed, schools have historically been the most static of social institutions, uncritically passing down from generation to generation outmoded didactic, lecture-and-drill-based, models of instruction. Predictable results follow. Students, on the whole, do not learn how to work by, or think for, themselves. They do not learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize and assess information. They do not learn how to analyze the diverse logic of (...)
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  42. Alex O. Holcombe Piers D. L. Howe (2012). The Effect of Visual Distinctiveness on Multiple Object Tracking Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 38.0
    Observers often need to attentively track moving objects. In everyday life, such objects are often visually distinctive. Previous studies have shown that tracking accuracy is increased when the targets contain a visual feature (e.g. a colour) not possessed by the distractors. Conversely, a gain in tracking accuracy was not observed when the targets differed from the distractors by only a conjunction of features (Makovski & Jiang, Visual Cognition, 17(1/2), 180). In this study we confirm that some conjunction targets (...)
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  43. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). No Work for a Theory of Grounding. Inquiry:1-45.score: 36.0
    It has recently been suggested that a distinctive metaphysical relation---"Grounding"---is ultimately at issue in contexts where some goings-on are said to hold "in virtue of"", be (constitutively) "metaphysically dependent on", or be "nothing over and above" some others (see Fine 2001, Schaffer 2009, and Rosen 2010). Grounding is supposed to do good work (better than merely modal notions, in particular) in illuminating metaphysical dependence. I argue that Grounding is also unsuited to do this work. To start, Grounding alone cannot do (...)
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  44. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2001). Connecting Vision with the World: Tracking the Missing Link. In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 183.score: 36.0
    You might reasonably surmise from the title of this paper that I will be discussing a theory of vision. After all, what is a theory of vision but a theory of how the world is connected to our visual representations? Theories of visual perception universally attempt to give an account of how a proximal stimulus (presumably a pattern impinging on the retina) can lead to a rich representation of a three dimensional world and thence to either the (...)
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  45. Mark McEvoy (2013). Causal Tracking Reliabilism and the Lottery Problem. Grazer Philosophische Studien 86 (1):73-92.score: 36.0
    The lottery problem is often regarded as a successful counterexample to reliabilism. The process of forming your true belief that your ticket has lost solely on the basis of considering the odds is, from a purely probabilistic viewpoint, much more reliable than the process of forming a true belief that you have lost by reading the results in a normally reliable newspaper. Reliabilism thus seems forced, counterintuitively, to count the former process as knowledge if it so counts the latter process. (...)
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  46. Jl Zalabardo (2012). Scepticism and Reliable Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    José L. Zalabardo defends a reliabilist theory of knowledge that belongs firmly in the truth-tracking tradition.
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  47. Michael Murez & Joulia Smortchkova (2014). Singular Thought: Object‐Files, Person‐Files, and the Sortal PERSON. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3).score: 36.0
    In philosophy, “singular thought” refers to our capacity to represent entities as individuals, rather than as possessors of properties. Philosophers who defend singularism argue that perception allows us to mentally latch onto objects and persons directly, without conceptualizing them as being of a certain sort. Singularists assume that singular thought forms a unified psychological kind, regardless of the nature of the individuals represented. Empirical findings on the special psychological role of persons as opposed to inanimates threaten singularism. They raise the (...)
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  48. John Dunn (2010). Tracking Democracy. Political Theory 38 (1):106 - 110.score: 36.0
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  49. J. Marriott & M. Minio-Paluello (2014). The Political and Material Landscape of European Energy Distribution: Tracking the Oil Road. Theory, Culture and Society 31 (5):83-101.score: 36.0
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  50. J. Crandall (2010). The Geospatialization of Calculative Operations: Tracking, Sensing and Megacities. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (6):68-90.score: 36.0
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