About this topic
Summary The Huayan (Flower Garland) School of Buddhism flourished in China during the Tang period, roughly from the late 500s until the mid 800s. The school derives its name from the Huayan Sutra, and along with the Tiantai School it ranks among the most important schools of Buddhism indigenous to China. Distinctive theses endorsed within the school, and illustrated with famous analogies of the golden lion and the jeweled net of Indra, include the mutual penetration of all dharmas past-present-and-future as well as the mutual identity of parts and wholes. But the school is also known for its contributions to classification systems of Buddhist teachings, for its use of paradoxical language, and for its innovations in conceptualizing causation. Specific teachings of the school that have attracted scholarly attention include doctrines of the three natures, the four realms, the six characteristics, the ten times, and the ten mysterious gates.
Key works Cook 1977 is a standard reference point for many other discussions in English. An early attempt to compare Huayan to process philosophy is Odin 1982, and a recent attempt to relate Huayan to postmodern ideas is Park 2008. For specific topics within the Huayan school, consult Lai 1977 on causation, Liu 1981 on hermeneutics, Wright 1982 on paradoxical language, Vorenkamp 2004 on faith, Jiang 2001 or Jones 2010 on mereology.
Introductions General introductions to the Huayan School include Cook 1977 and Chang 1971. Lai 1977, Liu 1981, and Gregory 1983 situate Huayan relative to other schools of Chinese Buddhism.
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  1. Fa-­tsang on Madhyamaka: Nagarjuna’s Treatise on the Twelve Gates and Fa-­tsang’s Commentary.Dirck Vorenkamp - manuscript
    Translation of Nagarjuna's -Treatise on the Twelve Gates- as well as fazang's commentary on that treatise.
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  2. How It All Depends: A Contemporary Reconstruction of Huayan Buddhism.Li Kang - forthcoming - In Oxford Handbook of Chinese Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Few would deny that something ontologically depends on something else. Given that something depends on something, what depends on what? Huayan Buddhism 華嚴宗, a prominent Chinese Buddhist school, is known for its extensive thesis of interdependence, according to which everything depends on everything else. This intriguing thesis is entangled with seemingly paradoxical claims that everything is not only identified with everything else but also contained within it. Moreover, the radical thesis of interdependence entails that dependence is pervasive and symmetric. In (...)
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  3. Fazang’s mereology as a model for holism.Felipe Cuervo Restrepo - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West.
    Recently, much attention has been given to Buddhism as a precursor to contemporary holistic theories, and more specifically to the Huayan school’s radical holistic metaphysics (often given the metaphorical name of The Net of Indra), as well as to Huayan’s most elaborate theoretician, Fazang. Nevertheless, contemporary interpretations of Fazang have been weighted by either too strict an adherence to atomistic logic or by unfortunate translations. In this paper, I present new translations of the key passages of Fazang’s The Rafter Dialogue, (...)
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  4. Metaphysical foundationalism, heterarchical structure, and Huayan interdependence.Nicholaos Jones - 2023 - Asian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):1-23.
    Standard views about metaphysical structure presume that if metaphysical structure is hierarchical, any priority ordering of individuals is rigid or situationally invariant. This paper challenges this presumption. The challenge derives from an effort to interpret the kind of metaphysical structure implicit in writings central to the Huayan tradition of Chinese Buddhism. The Huayan tradition views reality as a realm of thoroughgoing interdependence. Close attention to primary sources indicates that this view does not fit comfortably in any of the metaphysical structures (...)
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  5. Soteriological Mereology in the Pāli Discourses, Buddhaghosa, and Huayan Buddhism.Nicholaos Jones - 2023 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 22 (1):117-143.
    Extant discussions of Buddhist mereology give minimal attention to the soteriological significance of denying the reality of wholes. This is unfortunate, because the connection between mereology and soteriological is both significant and problematic. The connection is significant, because it supports an argument for the unreality of composite wholes that does not depend upon any claim about the nature of wholes. The connection is also problematic, because some Buddhists endorse the soteriological relevance of mereology despite admitting that composite wholes are real. (...)
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  6. Holistic Cognitive Style, Chinese Culture, and the Sinification of Buddhism.Ryan Nichols & Nicholaos Jones - 2023 - Res Philosophica 100 (1):93-120.
    According to many experiments in cross-cultural psychology, East Asians exhibit holistic cognitive style typified by use of resemblance heuristics, field dependence, external sources of causation, intuitive forms of reasoning, and interdependent forms of social thinking. Holistic cognitive style contrasts with analytic cognitive style, which is common to Westerners. Section 1 presents information on the background of Buddhism’s entry into and treatment by China. Section 2 discusses experimental evidence for the representation of holistic cognitive style in contemporary East Asians. Section 3 (...)
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  7. Perception of Events.Felipe Cuervo Restrepo - 2022 - Dissertation, Universidad de Los Andes
    La tesis trata de diversos problemas asociados con la metafísica de las entidades temporales y argumenta que muchos de ellos ocurren únicamente si asumimos de entrada que las entidades temporales tienen partes en el tiempo. Usando herramientas de lógica contemporánea y filosofía budista, la tesis argumenta a favor de una metafísica en que las entidades temporales pueden extenderse sobre períodos de tiempo sin tener partes en cada momento comprendido en dicha extensión. -/- The thesis deals with various problems associated with (...)
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  8. Ueda Shizuteru’s Zen Philosophy of Dialogue: The Free Exchange of Host and Guest.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):162-177.
    This essay seeks to understand the nature of both interpersonal and intercultural dialogue from the perspective of Zen Buddhism as it has been interpreted, in dialogue with Western philosophy and religion, by the central figure of the third generation of the Kyoto School: Ueda Shizuteru (1926–2019). It examines how Ueda develops a philosophy of interpersonal dialogue on the basis of Zen teachings and practices. In particular, it reveals how Ueda draws on Huayan and Zen Buddhist notions of “host” and “guest” (...)
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  9. Interpreting Interdependence in Fazang's Metaphysics.Nicholaos Jones - 2022 - Journal of East Asian Philosophy 2:35-52.
    This paper examines the metaphysics of interdependence in the work of the Chinese Buddhist Fazang. The dominant approach of this metaphysics interprets it as a species of metaphysical coherentism wherein everything depends upon everything else, no individual is more fundamental than any other, and so reality itself is non-well-founded in the sense that chains of dependence never terminate. I argue, to the contrary, that Fazang's metaphysics is better interpreted as a novel variety of foundationalism. I argue, as well, using set- (...)
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  10. Being a ‘not-quite-Buddhist theist’.James Dominic Rooney - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (4):787-800.
    Buddhism is a tradition that set itself decidedly against theism, with the development of complex arguments against the existence of God. I propose that the metaphysical conclusions reached by some schools in the Mahayana tradition present a vision of reality that, with some apparently small modification, would ground an argument for the existence of God. This argument involves explanation in terms of natures rather than causal agency. Yet I conclude not only that the Buddhist becomes a theist in embracing such (...)
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  11. Atheism is Nothing but an Expression of Buddha-Nature.Gereon Kopf - 2021 - Sophia 60 (3):607-622.
    The theism-atheism debate is foreign to many Mahāyāna Buddhist thinkers such as the Japanese Zen Master Dōgen. Nevertheless, his philosophy of ‘expression’ is able to shine a new light on the various incarnations of this debate throughout history. This paper will explore a/theism from Dōgen’s philosophical standpoint. Dōgen introduces the notion of ‘expression’ to describe the concomitant vertical and horizontal relationships of the religious project, namely the relationship between the individual and the divine as well as the relationship among a (...)
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  12. The Possibility of Moral Cultivation in the Ontological Oblivion: a Re-exploration of Hongzhou School of Chan Buddhism Through Guo Xiang.Christine Abigail Tan - 2021 - Philosophia: International Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):97-114.
    Chan Buddhism as we know it today can perhaps be traceable to what is known as the Hongzhou school, founded by Mazu Daoyi. Although it was Huineng who represented an important turn in the development of Chan with his iconoclastic approach to enlightenment as sudden rather than gradual, it was in Huineng’s successor, Mazu, where we saw its complete radicalization. Specifically, Mazu introduced a radicalized approach of collapsing substance and function, as well as principle and phenomena, into a complete overlap. (...)
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  13. Diverse Meanings of “Non-Empty” Implied in Buddhist Scriptures and Treatises: with a F ocus on the Huayan jing. 조연숙 - 2021 - Journal of the Society of Philosophical Studies 132:229-250.
    The Chinese word “bukong” 不空 appearing in the Āgama texts is a rendering of Pāli words such as aritta (not discarded), asuñña (not empty), amogha (not vain). Whereas the Madhyamika texts never affirm the term non‐empty as a counterpart of the concept emtpy, the Yogācāra texts overlay it with a slightly negative connotation as a false imagination. However, Tathāgatagarbha thought affirms that term positively, and Chinese strands of Buddhism further adopt it as an absolute affirmation by identifying emptiness with non‐emptiness, (...)
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  14. A Russellian Analysis of Buddhist Catuskoti.Nicholaos Jones - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):63-89.
    Names name, but there are no individuals who are named by names. This is the key to an elegant and ideologically parsimonious strategy for analyzing the Buddhist catuṣkoṭi. The strategy is ideologically parsimonious, because it appeals to no analytic resources beyond those of standard predicate logic. The strategy is elegant, because it is, in effect, an application of Bertrand Russell's theory of definite descriptions to Buddhist contexts. The strategy imposes some minor adjustments upon Russell's theory. Attention to familiar catuṣkoṭi from (...)
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  15. The architecture of Fazang’s six characteristics.Nicholaos Jones - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (3):468-491.
    This paper examines the Huayan teaching of the six characteristics as presented in the Rafter Dialogue from Fazang's Treatise on the Five Teachings. The goal is to make the teaching accessible to those with minimal training in Buddhist philosophy, and especially for those who aim to engage with the extensive question-and-answer section of the Rafter Dialogue. The method for achieving this goal is threefold: first, contextualizing Fazang's account of the characteristics with earlier Buddhist attempts to theorize the relationships between wholes (...)
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  16. Huayan Numismatics as Metaphysics: Explicating Fazang's Coin-Counting Metaphor.Nicholaos Jones - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1155-1177.
    This paper explicates the counting ten coins metaphor as it appears in Fazang’s Treatise on the Five Teachings of Huayan. The goal is to transform Fazang’s inexact and obscure mentions of the metaphor into something that is clearer and more precise. The method for achieving this goal is threefold: first, presenting Fazang’s version of the metaphor as improving upon prior efforts by Zhiyan and Ŭisang to interpret a brief stanza in the Avataṁsaka sutra; second, providing textual evidence to support this (...)
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  17. A Huayan View of the Infinite Regress. 고승학 - 2019 - Journal of the Society of Philosophical Studies 127:11-31.
    “Wuqiong,” namely the concept of infinite regress has been identified with the hallmark of the Huayan scholasticism, which is dubbed as “chongchong wujin” (repetitive containment ad infinitum). Such an inconceivable perspective is drawn from the Huayan thinkers’ presupposition that a part contains the whole, which is again composed of such parts. But many philosophical traditions, in general, try to avoid the infinite regress as one of the logical fallacies. This paper examines the Buddhist literature that alludes to “wuqiong” as infinite (...)
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  18. W ang Fuzhi’s Criticism of Buddhism and Its Limitations.Mingran Tan - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (3):381-400.
    Wang Fuzhi’s 王夫之 remarks on Buddhism have not been given sufficient attention despite increasing research on him. The few works on this topic either focus on just one aspect of his view of Buddhism or fail to disclose the purpose and uniqueness of his attack of it. This essay analyzes his view of Buddhism comprehensively, in particular his insight into the paradox of Buddhist universal love and his rejection of Buddhist retribution and reincarnation from Confucian righteousness and qi 氣-monism. In (...)
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  19. Chinese Buddhism and Confucianism: From Zongmi to Mou Zongsan.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2017 - In Youru Wang & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Dao Companion to Chinese Buddhist Philosophy: Dharma and Dao. Springer Verlag. pp. 155-171.
    This chapter sheds new light on the interaction between Chinese Buddhism and Confucianism by exploring and comparing the thoughts of the ninth century Huayan-Chan Buddhist Zongmi 宗密 and the twentieth century Neo-Confucian Mou Zongsan 牟宗三. It reveals the structural parallel between their opposing theories: both hold a doctrine of true mind as the central component, and both are influenced by the tathāgatagarbha 如來藏 doctrine of The Awakening of Faith. The former uses them to synthesize Huayan and Chan Buddhist soteriology; the (...)
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  20. On Goblet Words.Wim De Reu - 2017 - NTU Philosophical Review 53:75-108.
    This article attempts to reframe the state of research on the notion of goblet words in the Zhuangzi. Recent studies predominantly view the notion of zhiyan as referring to peculiar stylistic forms exhibited in the Zhuangzi—forms such as dilemmatic questions and paradoxes. In this article, I question the quick identification of these forms as zhiyan. I argue that zhiyan are essentially definite yet provisional simple-form utterances located on the level of everyday interaction and coexistence. On this level, the peculiar stylistic (...)
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  21. The Metaphysics of Identity in Fazang’s Huayan Wujiao Zhang: The Inexhaustible Freedom of Dependent Origination.Nicholaos Jones - 2017 - In Youru Wang & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Dao Companion to Chinese Buddhist Philosophy: Dharma and Dao. Springer Verlag. pp. 295-323.
    Fazang’s arguments in his Treatise on the Five Teachings of Huayan provide a philosophical foundation for the Avatamsaka Sutra’s rich and suggestive imagery. This chapter focuses on one of Fazang’s central arguments in that treatise, namely, his argument that mutually reliant dharmas are mutually identical. The chapter presents the background context for Fazang’s argument, reconstructs the argument’s logical structure, interprets the central concepts appearing therein, and explains why Fazang might have found plausible his argument’s premises. Specific discussion points include: the (...)
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  22. A Mahayana demonstration on the theme of action (Taishō volume 31, number 1609).John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi - 2017 - In John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi (eds.), Three short treatises by Vasubandhu, Sengzhao, and Zongmi. Moraga, California: BDK America.
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  23. Essays of Sengzhao (Taishō volume 45, number 1858).John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi - 2017 - In John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi (eds.), Three short treatises by Vasubandhu, Sengzhao, and Zongmi. Moraga, California: BDK America.
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  24. Treatise on the origin of humanity (Taishō volume 45, number 1886).John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi - 2017 - In John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi (eds.), Three short treatises by Vasubandhu, Sengzhao, and Zongmi. Moraga, California: BDK America.
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  25. Three short treatises by Vasubandhu, Sengzhao, and Zongmi.John P. Keenan, Sengzhao, Rafal Felbur, Jan Yün-hua, Vasubandhu & Zongmi (eds.) - 2017 - Moraga, California: BDK America.
    "The Treatise on the Origin of Humanity (Yuanren lun) by the Huayan patriarch Zongmi classifies various teachings of Buddhism on a scale of relative profundity, and specifically critiques the weaknesses of the teachings of Confucianism and Daoism, which he regards as inferior to Buddhism. This work formed the basis for some of the arguments in later East Asian history on the relationship of the three teachings." --.
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  26. Klasyfikacja doktryn buddyjskich według Zongmiego a istota religii.Kamil Nowak - 2017 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 7 (2):299-310.
    In the paper the system of doctrinal classification created by the Buddhist scholar of the Chinese Tang Dynasty Guifeng Zongmi has been analyzed. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part the author describes Zongmi’s doctrinal classification, focusing on the process of the deconstruction of consecutive Buddhist doctrines. In the second part the author compares particular doctrines with the most important theories on the essence of religion. The comparison aims at revealing the limitations of those theories, when applied (...)
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  27. Temporality and Non-temporality in Li Tongxuan’s Huayan Buddhism.Jin Y. Park - 2017 - In Youru Wang & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Dao Companion to Chinese Buddhist Philosophy: Dharma and Dao. Springer Verlag. pp. 325-347.
    This chapter discusses the Huayan Buddhism of Li Tongxuan. At the core of his Buddhism is the claim that sentient beings are equipped with exactly the same qualities as the Buddha. In his analysis of the 80-fascicle version of the Huayan Jing, Li claims that Huayan teaching is a subitist teaching that proposes the awakening in this lifetime. In this context, unlike “orthodox” Huayan thinkers, Li claims that the chapter “Entering the Realm of Reality” is the core of the Huayan (...)
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  28. The Meaning of “Part” and “Whole” in Huayan Thought. 고승학 - 2017 - Journal of the New Korean Philosophical Association 88:393-412.
    The texts written by Huayan thinkers are characterized by rather unintelligible expressions that identify the one with the many. Such an identity thesis can be justified by the fact that all individual objects in the world are based on the common principle of emptiness (Skt. śūnyatā). But we need to take into consideration the fact that Huayan thought emerged from the typical Chinese attitude that appreciates the inherent value of every phenomenal object. Thus the relationship between the one and the (...)
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  29. Thome H. Fang, Tang Junyi and Huayan Thought: A Confucian Appropriation of Buddhist Ideas in Response to Scientism in Twentieth-Century China.King Pong Chiu - 2016 - Boston: Brill.
    In Thomé H. Fang, Tang Junyi and Huayan Thought, King Pong Chiu discusses Thomé H. Fang and Tang Junyi, two of the most important Confucian thinkers in twentieth-century China, who appropriated aspects of the medieval Chinese Buddhist school of Huayan to develop a response to the challenges of ‘scientism’, the belief that quantitative natural science is the only valuable part of human learning and the only source of truth. -/- As Chiu argues, Fang’s and Tang’s selective appropriations of Huayan thought (...)
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  30. Translating Totality in Parts: Chengguan's Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra by Guo Cheen. [REVIEW]Nicholas Hudson - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):695-696.
    Guo Cheen’s Translating Totality in Parts: Chengguan’s Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra translates the first of eighty fascicles or juan of Chengguan’s A Compilation of the Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Flower Ornament Sutra with Greatly Proper and Extensive Discourses by the Buddhas as well as the preface to his The Meanings Proclaimed in the Subcommentaries Accompanying the Commentaries to the Flower Ornament Sutra with Greatly Proper and Extensive Discourses by the Buddha. Guo Cheen translates the preface first, (...)
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  31. Metaphorical Language in the Zhuangzi.C. M. Morrow - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (4):179-188.
    Chapter 27 of the ancient Chinese text the Zhuangzi describes three kinds of language: yuyan, zhiyan, and chongyan. Wang Fuzhi first coined the term ‘sanyan ’ or ‘tripartite-language’ to emphasize their overlapping characteristics and incorporate them into a cohesive approach to the text. Sanyan has been used consistently in interpreting the Zhuangzi since the earliest compilation of its extant version and continues to inform academic publications today. Based on descriptions found in the Zhuangzi's ‘miscellaneous chapters’ and on contemporary scholarship, I (...)
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  32. The Huayan Philosophers Fazang and Li Tongxuan on the “Six Marks” and the “Sphere of Edification”.Seunghak Koh - 2015 - The Eastern Buddhist 46 (2):1-18.
    Traditionally, Huayan 華嚴 (Jp. Kegon; K. Hwaŏm) scholasticism has been characterized by a grandiose metaphysical edifice formulated by some pioneering figures during the Sui 隋 (581–618) and Tang 唐 (618907) periods. Led by this stereotyped depiction, scholars tend to pay a little too much attention to the thought of the so-called “five Huayan patriarchs,” to the point that they fail to notice diverse facets of the tradition. As pointed out by Robert M. Gimello, such an attitude can be labelled as (...)
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  33. Buddhistische Metaphysik als Metapher, Performance und Algorithmus : Visualisierung des Avataṃsaka-sūtra (Huayan-jing).Isabel Seliger - 2015 - In Hanno Depner (ed.), Visuelle Philosophie. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.
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  34. Being and events: Huayan Buddhism's concept of event and whitehead's ontological principle.Vincent Shen - 2015 - In Chenyang Li & Franklin Perkins (eds.), Chinese Metaphysics and its Problems. Cambridge University Press. pp. 152-170.
    I will compare Huayan Buddhism's metaphysical vision ith that of A.N. Whitehead, both of them emphasizing that events in dynamic relation constitute the fundamental elements of reality. In Huayan Buddhism, all events are organically related to each ot and thereby constitute a harmonious and dynamic network of existents as metaphorized by Indra's Net of Jewels, in which one jewel reflects many other jewels and many reflect one. In Whitehead's view, events, or actual entities in Process and Reality, constitute the basic (...)
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  35. Translating Totality in Parts: Chengguan’s Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Avatamska Sutra.Guo Cheen - 2014 - Upa.
    This book offers an annotated translation of two of preeminent Chinese Tang dynasty monk Chengguan’s most revered masterpieces. With this book, Chengguan’s Commentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra and The Meanings Proclaimed in the Subcommentaries Accompanying the Commentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra are finally brought to Western audiences.
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  36. Philosophical Aspects of Sixth-Century Chinese Buddhist Debates on “Mind and Consciousness".Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2014 - In Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.), A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism. Hamburg University Press. pp. 337-395.
  37. Leibniz and Huayan Buddhism: Monads as Modified Li?Casey Rentmeester - 2014 - Lyceum 13 (1):36-57.
    When the question is posed as to when Chinese thought influenced Western philosophy, people often turn to the philosophy of the German rationalist Christian Wolff, whose 1721 speech on the virtues of Confucianism led to his academic indictment and eventual ousting from the University of Halle in 1723. In his speech, Wolff lauds the Chinese for attaining virtues by natural revelation rather than appealing to Christian revelation, which made their accomplishments all the more impressive in his eyes (Fuchs 2006). According (...)
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  38. The Huayan Metaphysics of Totality.Alan Fox - 2013 - In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 180–189.
    The story of Huayan Buddhism intertwines in many ways with many other more well‐known forms of Buddhist thought. The Buddhist concepts of upāya or “skillful means,” prajnapti from Yogācāra and paramārtha satya from Madhyamaka, justify a range of pragmatic propositions, which represent a healthy way of viewing the world. Upāya refers to the diagnostic and prescriptive skill of a buddha or bodhisattva, who is ostensibly able to discern a particular person's problem and recommend a helpful strategy for solving it. This (...)
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  39. Ethics of Tension: A Buddhist-Postmodern Ethical Paradigm.Jin Y. Park - 2013 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 10 (19):123-142.
    This essay considers an ethical paradigm that can be drawn from Buddhist and postmodern philosophy. Ethics is a practical branch of philosophy and an ethical paradigm is closely connected to the fundamental structure and tenets of a philosophical system. That ethics is a practical branch of philosophy also indicates that meaning and value of a certain ethical paradigm is directly related to the environments in which the paradigm is understood and practiced. In considering an ethical paradigm based on Buddhist and (...)
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  40. Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion.Ithamar Theodor & Zhihua Yao (eds.) - 2013 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Although there are various studies comparing Greek and Indian philosophy and religion, and Chinese and Western philosophy and religion, Brahman and Dao: Comparatives Studies in Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion is a first of its kind that brings together Indian and Chinese philosophies and religions. Brahman and Dao helps close the gap on a much needed examination on the rich history of Buddhist transmission to China, and the many generations of Indian Buddhist missionaries to China and Chinese Buddhist pilgrims (...)
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  41. Huayan Buddhism and Dewey: Emptiness, Compassion, and the Philosophical Fallacy.Gregory M. Fahy - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):260-271.
    Huayan Buddhist philosophers and John Dewey share a perspective on emptiness or dependent origination. This article compares Dewey's local, contextual, and relational metaphysics with Huayan thinkers’ use of the metaphor of Indra's jewel net to extend their relational metaphysics to an infinite extent. Huayan thinkers base their ethics of compassion on the recognition of the infinite relatedness of all things. Dewey prefers constructing social institutions that foster experiences that are reliably aesthetically unified. This dispute is significant because pragmatism and Buddhism (...)
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  42. Buddhism and Postmodernity: Zen, Huayan, and the Possibility of Buddhist Postmodern Ethics (review).Sor-Ching Low - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):417-420.
  43. Between One and Many: Multiples, Multiplication and the Huayan Metaphysics.Hsueh-Man Shen - 2012 - In Shen Hsueh-Man (ed.), Proceedings of the British Academy Volume 181, 2010-2011 Lectures. pp. 205.
    Modern art history practice often treats Buddhist icons or ritual objects as unique objects, focusing on their originality and uniqueness. This text investigates how the paradoxical Buddhist doctrine of ‘the one and the many’ was translated into visual language through manipulation of the relationship between copies and the original. It analyses the different tactics and strategies formulated around given socio-historical frameworks to visualise the notion of infinity, and ultimately the structure of the universe, and suggests that multiple copies of a (...)
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  44. Spinoza and the Self-Overcoming of Solipsism.Brook Ziporyn - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):125 - 140.
    Spinoza, as a monist and a rationalist, seems unlikely to have occasion to confront any form of the solipsism problem. However, a close examination of his epistemology reveals that he does in fact confront a very radical form of this problem, and offers an equally radical solution to it, derived from the very epistemological premises that make it a potential problem for him. In particular, we find that the conception of the mind as the “idea of the body,” premised on (...)
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  45. Li Tongxuan's (635--730) Thought and His Place in the Huayan Tradition of Chinese Buddhism.Seunghak Koh - 2011 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    This dissertation explores diverse facets of the Chinese Huayan tradition by analyzing the thought of the lay exegete Li Tongxuan (635–730). -/- Although Li's ideas have been considered idiosyncratic and even heterodox from the standpoint of the "orthodox" five Huayan patriarchs, we should not restrict our perspective to this narrow framework. As a lay scholar who had a strong practical orientation, Li had a solid literary background in indigenous Chinese philosophy and applied this knowledge to the explication of the newly (...)
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  46. Mou Zongsan’s “Transcendental” Interpretation of Huayan Buddhism.Andres Siu-Kwong Tang - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):238-256.
    This article will first give an account of Mou's judgment of the transcendental character of Huayan School by tracing his understanding of the doctrinal relationship between the “One Mind Opens Two Doors” in the Awakening of Faith in the Mahāyāna and the “Simply True Mind” of Huayan School. Second, Mou's interpretation of “the co-dependent origination of tathagatgarbha” of Huayan School will be analyzed so as to identify the sense in which Mou considers that the teaching of Huayan School is perfect. (...)
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  47. Interpretation of yogācāra philosophy in huayan buddhism.Imre Hamar - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):181-197.
    Huayan Buddhism is regarded as one of the most philosophical schools of Chinese Buddhism, representing the elite-scholar Buddhism under the Tang Dynasty. Its vision of truth is based on the Avatamsaka Sutra, the scripture that Huayan masters studied, explained, and commented intensively throughout their lives. This was the common vocation of these monks, which gradually created a lineage of the Huayan tradition, a succession of exegetes who believed that the Avatamsaka Sutra was the consummate teaching of Buddha preached directly after (...)
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  48. Review of Jin Y. park, buddhism and postmodernity: Zen, huayan, and the possibility of buddhist postmodern ethics. [REVIEW]Peter D. Hershock - 2010 - Sophia 49 (1):153-155.
  49. Nyāya-vaiśesika inherence, buddhist reduction, and huayan total power.Nicholaos Jones - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):215-230.
    This paper elaborates upon various responses to the Problem of the One over the Many, in the service of two central goals. The first is to situate Huayan's mereology within the context of Buddhism's historical development, showing its continuity with a broader tradition of philosophizing about part-whole relations. The second goal is to highlight the way in which Huayan's mereology combines the virtues of the Nyāya-Vaisheshika and Indian Buddhist solutions to the Problem of the One over the Many while avoiding (...)
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  50. Mereological heuristics for huayan buddhism.Nicholaos John Jones - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (3):355-368.
    This is an attempt to explain, in a way familiar to contemporary ways of thinking about mereology, why someone might accept some prima facie puzzling remarks by Fazang, such as his claims that the eye of a lion is its ear and that a rafter of a building is identical to the building itself. These claims are corollaries of the Huayan Buddhist thesis that everything is part of everything else, and it is intended here to show that there is a (...)
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