69 found
Order:
  1.  13
    Words, Thoughts, and Theories.Alison Gopnik - 1997 - MIT Press.
    Recently, the theory theory has led to much interesting research. However, this is the first book to look at the theory in extensive detail and to systematically contrast it with other theories.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   164 citations  
  2.  78
    A Theory of Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & David Danks - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):3-32.
    We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent, learned representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously understood in terms of the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Children’s causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learning causal Bayes nets and for predicting with them. Experimental results suggest that 2- to 4-year-old children (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   180 citations  
  3. Why the Child's Theory of Mind Really is a Theory.Alison Gopnik & H. M. Wellman - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):145-71.
  4. Words, Thoughts, and Theories.Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1999 - Mind 108 (430):395-398.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   228 citations  
  5. How We Know Our Minds: The Illusion of First-Person Knowledge of Intentionality.Alison Gopnik - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):1-14.
  6.  63
    Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation.Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory theories of concepts and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  7.  93
    Explanation as Orgasm.Alison Gopnik - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (1):101-118.
    I argue that explanation should be thought of as the phenomenological mark of the operation of a particular kind of cognitive system, the theory-formation system. The theory-formation system operates most clearly in children and scientists but is also part of our everyday cognition. The system is devoted to uncovering the underlying causal structure of the world. Since this process often involves active intervention in the world, in the case of systematic experiment in scientists, and play in children, the cognitive system (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  8.  36
    Conceptual and Semantic Development as Theory Change: The Case of Object Permanence.Alison Gopnik - 1988 - Mind and Language 3 (3):197-216.
  9. Mechanisms of Theory Formation in Young Children.Alison Gopnik - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (8):371-377.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  10.  64
    What Does "Mind-Wandering" Mean To The Folk? An Empirical Investigation.Zachary C. Irving, Aaron Glasser, Alison Gopnik & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - manuscript
    Although mind-wandering research is rapidly progressing, stark disagreements are emerging about what the term “mind-wandering” means. Four prominent views define mind-wandering as 1) task-unrelated thought, 2) stimulus-independent thought, 3) unintentional thought, or 4) dynamically unguided thought. Although theorists claim to capture the ordinary understanding of mind-wandering, no systematic studies have assessed these claims. Two large factorial studies present participants (n=545) with vignettes that describe someone’s thoughts and ask whether her mind was wandering, while systematically manipulating features relevant to the four (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  47
    Developing the Idea of Intentionality: Children's Theories of Mind.Alison Gopnik - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):89-114.
    At least since Augustine, philosophers have constructed developmental just-so stories about the origins of certain concepts. In these just-so stories, philosophers tell us how children must develop these concepts. However, philosophers have by and large neglected the empirical data about how children actually do develop their ideas about the world. At best they have used information about children in an anecdotal and unsystematic, though often illuminating, way.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  12.  16
    Causal Learning Mechanisms in Very Young Children: Two-, Three-, and Four-Year-Olds Infer Causal Relations From Patterns of Variation and Covariation.Clark Glymour, Alison Gopnik, David M. Sobel & Laura E. Schulz - unknown
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  13.  43
    Developing Intuitions About Free Will Between Ages Four and Six.Tamar Kushnir, Alison Gopnik, Nadia Chernyak, Elizabeth Seiver & Henry M. Wellman - 2015 - Cognition 138:79-101.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14.  29
    Children’s Imitation of Causal Action Sequences is Influenced by Statistical and Pedagogical Evidence.Daphna Buchsbaum, Alison Gopnik, Thomas L. Griffiths & Patrick Shafto - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):331-340.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  15.  27
    Rational Variability in Children’s Causal Inferences: The Sampling Hypothesis.Stephanie Denison, Elizabeth Bonawitz, Alison Gopnik & Thomas L. Griffiths - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):285-300.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  16. The Scientist as Child.Alison Gopnik - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):485-514.
    This paper argues that there are powerful similarities between cognitive development in children and scientific theory change. These similarities are best explained by postulating an underlying abstract set of rules and representations that underwrite both types of cognitive abilities. In fact, science may be successful largely because it exploits powerful and flexible cognitive devices that were designed by evolution to facilitate learning in young children. Both science and cognitive development involve abstract, coherent systems of entities and rules, theories. In both (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  17.  22
    Just Do It? Investigating the Gap Between Prediction and Action in Toddlers’ Causal Inferences.Elizabeth Baraff Bonawitz, Darlene Ferranti, Rebecca Saxe, Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, James Woodward & Laura E. Schulz - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):104-117.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  18.  31
    Children's Causal Inferences From Indirect Evidence: Backwards Blocking and Bayesian Reasoning in Preschoolers.Alison Gopnik - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (3):303-333.
    Previous research suggests that children can infer causal relations from patterns of events. However, what appear to be cases of causal inference may simply reduce to children recognizing relevant associations among events, and responding based on those associations. To examine this claim, in Experiments 1 and 2, children were introduced to a “blicket detector”, a machine that lit up and played music when certain objects were placed upon it. Children observed patterns of contingency between objects and the machine’s activation that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  19. Whose Concepts Are They, Anyway? The Role of Philosophical Intuition in Empirical Psychology.Alison Gopnik & Eric Schwitzgebel - 1998 - In M. R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.), Rethinking Intuition. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 75--91.
    This chapter examines several ways in which philosophical attention to intuition can contribute to empirical scientific psychology. The authors then discuss one prevalent misuse of intuition. An unspoken assumption of much argumentation in the philosophy of mind has been that to articulate our folk psychological intuitions, our ordinary concepts of belief, truth, meaning, and so forth, is itself sufficient to give a theoretical account of what belief, truth, meaning, and so forth, actually are. It is believed that this assumption rests (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  20. Data-Mining Probabilists or Experimental Determinists.Thomas Richardson, Laura Schulz & Alison Gopnik - 2007 - In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press. pp. 208--230.
  21.  64
    Pretense, Counterfactuals, and Bayesian Causal Models: Why What Is Not Real Really Matters.Deena S. Weisberg & Alison Gopnik - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (7):1368-1381.
    Young children spend a large portion of their time pretending about non-real situations. Why? We answer this question by using the framework of Bayesian causal models to argue that pretending and counterfactual reasoning engage the same component cognitive abilities: disengaging with current reality, making inferences about an alternative representation of reality, and keeping this representation separate from reality. In turn, according to causal models accounts, counterfactual reasoning is a crucial tool that children need to plan for the future and learn (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22.  15
    Explaining Prompts Children to Privilege Inductively Rich Properties.Caren M. Walker, Tania Lombrozo, Cristine H. Legare & Alison Gopnik - 2014 - Cognition 133 (2):343-357.
    Two studies examined the specificity of effects of explanation on learning by prompting 3- to 6-year-old children to explain a mechanical toy and comparing what they learned about the toy’s causal and non-causal properties to children who only observed the toy, both with and without accompanying verbalization. In Study 1, children were experimentally assigned to either explain or observe the mechanical toy. In Study 2, children were classified according to whether the content of their response to an undirected prompt involved (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  23. The Theory Theory as an Alternative to the Innateness Hypothesis.Alison Gopnik - 2003 - In Louise M. Antony (ed.), Chomsky and His Critics. Blackwell. pp. 238--254.
  24. Learning From Doing: Intervention and Causal Inference.Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & Alison Gopnik - 2007 - In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press. pp. 67--85.
  25. Causal Learning Across Domains.Alison Gopnik - unknown
    Five studies investigated (a) children’s ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of biology and psychology. Experiment 2 replicated the results in the domain of biology with a more complex pattern of conditional dependencies. In Experiment 3, children used evidence about patterns of dependence and independence (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  26.  21
    When Children Are Better Learners Than Adults: Developmental Differences in Learning the Forms of Causal Relationships.Christopher G. Lucas, Sophie Bridgers, Thomas L. Griffiths & Alison Gopnik - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):284-299.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27.  22
    Causal Maps and Bayes Nets: A Cognitive and Computational Account of Theory-Formation.Alison Gopnik & Clark Glymour - 2002 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press. pp. 117--132.
  28. Minds, Bodies, and Persons: Young Children's Understanding of the Self and Others as Reflected in Imitation and Theory of Mind Research.Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1994 - In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
  29.  17
    Probabilistic Models, Learning Algorithms, and Response Variability: Sampling in Cognitive Development.Elizabeth Bonawitz, Stephanie Denison, Thomas L. Griffiths & Alison Gopnik - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (10):497-500.
  30. Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel & Laura E. Schultz - unknown
    We outline a cognitive and computational account of causal learning in children. We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously represented by the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Human causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learnig causal Bayes nets and for predicting with (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  27
    Linguistic and Cognitive Abilities in Infancy: When Does Language Become a Tool for Categorization?Thierry Nazzi & Alison Gopnik - 2001 - Cognition 80 (3):B11-B20.
  32.  12
    11 Theories and Modules; Creation Myths, Developmental Realities, and Neurath's Boat.Alison Gopnik - 1996 - In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 169.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  33.  56
    Bayes and Blickets: Effects of Knowledge on Causal Induction in Children and Adults.Thomas L. Griffiths, David M. Sobel, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Alison Gopnik - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (8):1407-1455.
    People are adept at inferring novel causal relations, even from only a few observations. Prior knowledge about the probability of encountering causal relations of various types and the nature of the mechanisms relating causes and effects plays a crucial role in these inferences. We test a formal account of how this knowledge can be used and acquired, based on analyzing causal induction as Bayesian inference. Five studies explored the predictions of this account with adults and 4-year-olds, using tasks in which (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  30
    Inferring Hidden Causal Structure.Tamar Kushnir, Alison Gopnik, Chris Lucas & Laura Schulz - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (1):148-160.
    We used a new method to assess how people can infer unobserved causal structure from patterns of observed events. Participants were taught to draw causal graphs, and then shown a pattern of associations and interventions on a novel causal system. Given minimal training and no feedback, participants in Experiment 1 used causal graph notation to spontaneously draw structures containing one observed cause, one unobserved common cause, and two unobserved independent causes, depending on the pattern of associations and interventions they saw. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  19
    Theories and Illusions.Alison Gopnik - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):90-100.
  36. Young Children Infer Causal Strength From Probabilities and Interventions.Alison Gopnik - unknown
    Word count (excluding abstract and references): 2,498 words. Address for correspondence: T. Kushnir, Psychology Department, University of California, 3210 Tolman Hall #1650, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650. Phone: 510-205-9847. Fax: 510-642- 5293. E-mail: tkushnir@berkeley.edu.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37.  13
    Psychopsychology.Alison Gopnik - 1993 - Consciousness and Cognition 2 (4):264-280.
  38. Could David Hume Have Known About Buddhism?Alison Gopnik - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):5-28.
    Philosophers and Buddhist scholars have noted the affinities between David Hume's empiricism and the Buddhist philosophical tradition. I show that it was possible for Hume to have had contact with Buddhist philosophical views. The link to Buddhism comes through the Jesuit scholars at the Royal College of La Fleche. Charles Francois Dolu was a Jesuit missionary who lived at the Royal College from 1723-1740, overlapping with Hume's stay. He had extensive knowledge both of other religions and cultures and of scientific (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  16
    Probabilistic Models as Theories of Children's Minds.Alison Gopnik - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):200-201.
    My research program proposes that children have representations and learning mechanisms that can be characterized as causal models of the world Bayesian Fundamentalism.”.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  55
    Why Babies Are More Conscious Than We Are.Alison Gopnik - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):503-504.
    Block argues for a method and a substantive thesis – that consciousness overflows accessibility. The method can help answer the question of what it is like to be a baby. Substantively, infant consciousness may be accessible in some ways but not others. But development itself can also add important methodological tools and substantive insights to the study of consciousness.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41.  23
    Learning From Actions and Their Consequences: Inferring Causal Variables From Continuous Sequences of Human Action.Daphna Buchsbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths, Alison Gopnik & Dare Baldwin - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 134.
  42.  21
    Which Counterfactuals Matter? A Response to Beck.Deena Skolnick Weisberg & Alison Gopnik - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):257-259.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  37
    A Unified Account of Abstract Structure and Conceptual Change: Probabilistic Models and Early Learning Mechanisms.Alison Gopnik - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):129-130.
    We need not propose, as Carey does, a radical discontinuity between core cognition, which is responsible for abstract structure, and language and which are responsible for learning and conceptual change. From a probabilistic models view, conceptual structure and learning reflect the same principles, and they are both in place from the beginning.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  13
    The Early Emergence and Puzzling Decline of Relational Reasoning: Effects of Knowledge and Search on Inferring Abstract Concepts.Caren M. Walker, Sophie Bridgers & Alison Gopnik - 2016 - Cognition 156:30-40.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Cognition and Explanation.Herbert A. Simon, Discovering Explanations, Clark Glymour, Andy Clark, Twisted Tales, Alison Gopnik & Explanation as Orgasm - 1998 - Cognition 8 (1).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46.  41
    Theories Vs. Modules: To the Max and Beyond: A Reply to Poulin-Dubois and to Stich and Nichols.Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (3):450-456.
  47.  21
    Developmental Differences in Learning the Forms of Causal Relationships.Chris Lucas, Alison Gopnik & Thomas L. Griffiths - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 28--52.
  48. Sorting and Acting with Objects in Early Childhood: An Exploration of the Use of Causal Cues.Alison Gopnik - unknown
    Three experiments investigated young children’s ability to use a causal property, making a machine light up and play music, to sort objects together (sorting task), and then to predict how to make the machine work (action task). The results show that the performance of 30-month-old children is guided in both tasks by the causal properties of the objects. This suggests that causal information is used to categorize objects even in a task that does not involve naming. The causal interpretation of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  44
    Reply to Commentators.Alison Gopnik - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):552-561.
  50.  10
    Theories and Qualities.Alison Gopnik - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):44-45.
1 — 50 / 69