Results for 'Andrew Clarke'

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  1. Animal Rights: A Historical Anthology.Andrew Linzey & Paul Barry Clarke (eds.) - 2004 - Columbia University Press.
    This comprehensive and diverse anthology, the only one of its kind, illuminates the complex evolution of moral thought regarding animals and includes writings from ancient Greece to the present. _Animal Rights_ reveals the ways in which a variety of thinkers have addressed such issues as our ethical responsibilities for the welfare of animals, whether animals have rights, and what it means to be human.
     
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  2. Joint Action Goals Reduce Visuomotor Interference Effects From a Partner’s Incongruent Actions.Sam Clarke, Luke McEllin, Anna Francová, Marcell Székely, Stephen Andrew Butterfill & John Michael - 2019 - Scientific Reports 9 (1).
    Joint actions often require agents to track others’ actions while planning and executing physically incongruent actions of their own. Previous research has indicated that this can lead to visuomotor interference effects when it occurs outside of joint action. How is this avoided or overcome in joint actions? We hypothesized that when joint action partners represent their actions as interrelated components of a plan to bring about a joint action goal, each partner’s movements need not be represented in relation to distinct, (...)
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  3.  14
    Cross-Sector Partnerships for Systemic Change: Systematized Literature Review and Agenda for Further Research.Amelia Clarke & Andrew Crane - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):303-313.
    The literature on cross-sector partnerships has increasingly focused attention on broader systemic or system-level change. However, research to date has been partial and fragmented, and the very idea of systemic change remains conceptually underdeveloped. In this article, we seek to better understand what is meant by systemic change in the context of cross-sector partnerships and use this as a basis to discuss the contributions to the Thematic Symposium. We present evidence from a broad, multidisciplinary systematized review of the extant literature, (...)
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  4.  65
    Peer Review Versus Editorial Review and Their Role in Innovative Science.Georg Steinhauser, Wolfram Adlassnig, Jesaka Ahau Risch, Serena Anderlini, Petros Arguriou, Aaron Zolen Armendariz, William Bains, Clark Baker, Martin Barnes, Jonathan Barnett, Michael Baumgartner, Thomas Baumgartner, Charles A. Bendall, Yvonne S. Bender, Max Bichler, Teresa Biermann, Ronaldo Bini, Eduardo Blanco, John Bleau, Anthony Brink, Darin Brown, Christopher Burghuber, Roy Calne, Brian Carter, Cesar Castaño, Peter Celec, Maria Eugenia Celis, Nicky Clarke, David Cockrell, David Collins, Brian Coogan, Jennifer Craig, Cal Crilly, David Crowe, Antonei B. Csoka, Chaza Darwich, Topiciprin del Kebos, Michele DeRinaldi, Bongani Dlamini, Tomasz Drewa, Michael Dwyer, Fabienne Eder, Raúl Ehrichs de Palma, Dean Esmay, Catherine Evans Rött, Christopher Exley, Robin Falkov, Celia Ingrid Farber, William Fearn, Sophie Felsmann, Jarl Flensmark, Andrew K. Fletcher, Michaela Foster, Kostas N. Fountoulakis, Jim Fouratt, Jesus Garcia Blanca, Manuel Garrido Sotelo, Florian Gittler, Georg Gittler & Go - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (5):359-376.
    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that (...)
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  5.  12
    Capturing Collaborative Challenges: Designing Complexity-Sensitive Theories of Change for Cross-Sector Partnerships.Amelia Clarke & Andrew Crane - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):315-332.
    Systems change requires complex interventions. Cross-sector partnerships face the daunting task of addressing complex societal problems by aligning different backgrounds, values, ideas and resources. A major challenge for CSPs is how to link the type of partnership to the intervention needed to drive change. Intervention strategies are thereby increasingly based on Theories of Change. Applying ToCs is often a donor requirement, but it also reflects the ambition of a partnership to enhance its transformative potential. The current use of ToCs in (...)
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  6. Dictionary of Ethics, Theology, and Society.Paul A. B. Clarke & Andrew Linzey (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    In over 200 separately-authored entries, this reference surveys both the historical and contemporary relations between religion and society. A selection of the world's leading scholars from varying disciplines and denominations cover all aspects of philosophy, theology, ethics, politics, economics and government, providing a brief definition of each term, a description of the principal ideas behind it, its history, development and contemporary relevance, and a detailed bibliography giving the major sources in the field. The Dictionary is prefaced by an introduction outlining (...)
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  7.  76
    Taking Ethical Photos of Children for Medical and Research Purposes in Low-Resource Settings: An Exploratory Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Delan Devakumar, Helen Brotherton, Jay Halbert, Andrew Clarke, Audrey Prost & Jennifer Hall - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):27.
    Photographs are commonly taken of children in medical and research contexts. With the increased availability of photographs through the internet, it is increasingly important to consider their potential for negative consequences and the nature of any consent obtained. In this research we explore the issues around photography in low-resource settings, in particular concentrating on the challenges in gaining informed consent.
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  8.  16
    Comment on Christopher Winch's 'the Economic Aims of Education'.Peter Clarke & Andrew Mearman - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):249–255.
  9. A Collection of Papers, Which Passed Between the Late Learned Mr. Leibnitz and Dr. Clarke in the Years 1715 and 1716 Relating to the Principles of Natural Philosophy and Religion : With an Appendix : To Which Are Added, Letters to Dr. Clarke Concerning Liberty and Necessity, From a Gentleman of the University of Cambridge, with the Doctor's Answers to Them : Also, Remarks Upon a Book, Entituled, a Philosophical Enquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW]Samuel Clarke & Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1717 - Printed for James Knapton.
  10.  7
    Abortion Funding: Legal and Moral Questions.Dolores Dooley Clarke, Sidney Callahan & Andrew Altman - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (2):4.
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  11.  20
    Genome Instability: Does Genetic Diversity Amplification Drive Tumorigenesis?Andrew B. Lane & Duncan J. Clarke - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (11):963-972.
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  12. Comment on Christopher Winch's'the Economic Aims of Education'.Clarke Peter & Mearman Andrew - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2).
  13. The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08.Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
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  14. Leibniz and Clarke: Correspondence.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Samuel Clarke & Roger Ariew - 2000 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    For this new edition, Roger Ariew has adapted Samuel Clarke's edition of 1717, modernizing it to reflect contemporary English usage. Ariew's introduction places the correspondence in historical context and discusses the vibrant philosophical climate of the times. Appendices provide those selections from the works of Newton that Clarke frequently refers to in the correspondence. A bibliography is also included.
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  15.  38
    The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks.Samuel Clarke - 1956 - Barnes & Noble.
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  16. The Universe as Journey, Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S. J.W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.) - 1988 - Fordham University Press.
    W. Norris Clarke's metaphysics of the universe as a journey rests on six major positions: the unrestricted dynamism of the mind, the primacy of the act of existence, the participation structure of reality, and the person, considered as both the starting point of philosophy and the source of the categories needed for a flexible contemporary metaphysics. Reflecting on his conscious life and the universe around him, the finite person mounts by a two-fold path to its Infinite source, who, though (...)
     
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  17. The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Samuel Clarke - 1956 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
  18.  39
    Keston Clarke.Dudley Montague Clarke - 1984 - The Chesterton Review 10 (1):109-110.
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  19.  22
    Islamic Millenarianism in West Africa: A ‘Revolutionary’ Ideology?: P. B. CLARKE.P. B. Clarke - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (3):317-339.
    Social and political scientists, historians and others, have put forward a number of widely differing views concerning the ‘character’ of Islamic millenarian and/or Mahdist movements in Africa. The same is true of course with regard to the opinions ofscholars concerning the transformative capacity of Islam as an ideology. In this paper I want to look at one aspect only of Islamic millenarianism in the West African context, viz. its allegedly revolutionary character.
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  20.  14
    Greek Studies in England 1700–1830. By M. L. Clarke. Pp. 255. Cambridge: University Press. 1945. 18s.A. M. Woodward & M. L. Clarke - 1945 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 65:116-116.
  21.  13
    Acting According to Conscience: Desmond M. Clarke.Desmond M. Clarke - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:135-149.
    We have inherited from the history of moral philosophy two very different proposals about how we ought to behave. According to one view, we are required to do what is morally right; on the alternative formulation, we are required to do what we believe to be morally right. Unless these twin demands on our moral decision-making can be made to coincide by definition, it is inevitable that in some cases our beliefs about what is morally right may be mistaken. In (...)
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  22. The Marriage of John Locke's 'Wife', Elizabeth Clarke.B. Clarke - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:93.
     
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  23. Thomas Stringer, Locke, Shaftesbury, and Edward Clarke: New Archival Discoveries.Bridget Clarke - 2008 - Locke Studies 8:171-199.
     
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  24. Colloquiorum ... Familiarium Opus Aureum, Cum Scholiis Quibusdam Antehac Non Editis. Ed. Omnium Absolutissima [by J. Clarke]. [REVIEW]Desiderius Erasmus & John Clarke - 1699
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  25. Erasmi Colloquia Selecta; or, the Select Colloquies of Erasmus, with an Engl. Tr. By J. Clarke. 15th Ed.Desiderius Erasmus & John Clarke - 1759
     
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  26. Inquiries Into Medieval Philosophy a Collection in Honor of Francis P. Clarke. --.James F. Ross & Francis Palmer Clarke - 1971 - Greenwood Pub. Co.
  27. Philosophical Essays in Honor of Edgar Arthur Singer, Jr. Edited by F.P. Clarke and M.C. Nahm.Edgar Arthur Singer, Francis Palmer Clarke & Milton Charles Nahm - 1962 - Books for Libraries Press.
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  28.  21
    Religions Traditional and New in the Encyclopedia of Religion: PETER B. CLARKE.Peter B. Clarke - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (1):19-27.
    A comedy, unlike a tragedy which the experts maintain has to succeed greatly if it is to succeed at all, can be evaluated on a more or less basis. The former can likewise be great, but it can also be quite funny or only mildly amusing and remain a worthwhile comedy and it is this kind of relativist assessment that this writer believes is appropriate with regard to the sections of this encyclopaedia dealing with ‘traditional’ and ‘new’ religions. The former (...)
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  29.  9
    Nature and Grace: A New Approach to Thomistic Ressourcement. By Andrew Dean Swafford. Pp. Xiv, 205, Cambridge, James Clarke, 2015, $23.56. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (6):1010-1011.
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  30.  10
    Nature and Grace: A New Approach to Thomistic Ressourcement. By Andrew Dean Swafford. Pp. Xiv, 205, Cambridge, James Clarke, 2015, $25.00. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (6):1089-1090.
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  31.  7
    Animal Rights: A Historical Anthology , Ed. Andrew Linzey and Paul Barry Clarke.David Corner - 2007 - Between the Species 13 (7):10.
  32.  1
    Anthony Clarke and Andrew Moore, Eds., Within the Love of God: Essays on the Doctrine of God in Honour of Paul S. Fiddes. Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Wm Curtis Holtzen - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):189-192.
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  33.  68
    David S. Clarke, Some Pragmatist Themes. [REVIEW]Andrew Howat - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):143-149.
    David S. Clarke is clearly passionate about pragmatism. In this short, compelling book he explores what he calls “two fundamental claims” of pragmatism. He does this, he explains, with the “conviction that if pragmatism is to continue as a viable force in contemporary philosophy it must incorporate advances in philosophical method introduced by the linguistic philosophers of the past century” (xi). -/- The two fundamental claims that interest Clarke are as follows: -/- that cognitive inquiry and belief are (...)
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  34.  71
    The Justification of Religious Violence, by Steve Clarke: Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell, 2014, Pp. Xii + 259, US$29.95.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):206-206.
  35. Isaac Newton: Philosophical Writings.Andrew Janiak (ed.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Sir Isaac Newton left a voluminous legacy of writings. Despite his influence on the early modern period, his correspondence, manuscripts, and publications in natural philosophy remain scattered throughout many disparate editions. In this volume, Newton's principal philosophical writings are for the first time collected in a single place. They include excerpts from the Principia and the Opticks, his famous correspondence with Boyle and with Bentley, and his equally significant correspondence with Leibniz, which is often ignored in favor of Leibniz's later (...)
     
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  36. Philosophical Writings.Isaac Newton - 2004 - Cambridge: Uk ;Cambridge University Press.
    Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) left a voluminous legacy of writings. Despite his influence on the early modern period, his correspondence, manuscripts, and publications in natural philosophy remain scattered throughout many disparate editions. In this volume, Newton's principal philosophical writings are for the first time collected in a single place. They include excerpts from the Principia and the Opticks, his famous correspondence with Boyle and with Bentley, and his equally significant correspondence with Leibniz, which is often ignored in favor of Leibniz's (...)
     
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  37.  15
    Clarke's Rejection of Superadded Gravity in the Clarke-Collins Correspondence.L. B. Wolf - 2019 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 36 (3):237-255.
    In the past, experts have disagreed about whether Samuel Clarke accepted the idea that gravity is a power superadded to matter by God. Most scholars now agree that Clarke did not support superaddition. But the argumentation employed by Clarke to reject superaddition has not been studied before in detail. In this paper, I explicate Clarke's argumentation by relating it to an important discussion about the possibility of superadded gravity in the Clarke-Collins correspondence. I examine (...)'s responses to Collins and draw on his other works to reconstruct Clarke's reasons for rejecting superadded gravity. (shrink)
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  38. From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality.Frédéric Bouchard & Philippe Huneman (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature’s paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together—as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis—new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
     
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  39. John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism.John J. Tilley - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):69-89.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition (...)
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  40. Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence, Brain in a Vat, Five-Minute Hypothesis, McTaggart’s Paradox, Etc. Are Clarified in Quantum Language [Revised Version].Shiro Ishikawa - 2018 - Open Journal of Philosophy 8 (5):466-480.
    Recently we proposed "quantum language" (or, the linguistic Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics"), which was not only characterized as the metaphysical and linguistic turn of quantum mechanics but also the linguistic turn of Descartes=Kant epistemology. We believe that quantum language is the language to describe science, which is the final goal of dualistic idealism. Hence there is a reason to want to clarify, from the quantum linguistic point of view, the following problems: "brain in a vat argument", "the Cogito proposition", (...)
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  41. Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke on Desire and Self-Interest.John J. Tilley - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (1): 1-24.
    Among the most animating debates in eighteenth-century British ethics was the debate over psychological egoism, the view that our most basic desires are self-interested. An important episode in that debate, less well known than it should be, was the exchange between Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke of Hull. In the early editions of his Inquiry into Virtue, Hutcheson argued ingeniously against psychological egoism; in his Foundation of Morality, Clarke argued ingeniously against Hutcheson’s arguments. Later, Hutcheson attempted new arguments (...)
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  42. On Free Will, Responsibility and Indeterminism: Responses to Clarke, Haji, and Mele.Robert Kane - 1999 - Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):105-121.
    This paper responds to three critical essays on my book, The Significance of Free Will(Oxford, 1996) by Randolph Clarke, Istiyaque Haji and Alfred Mele (which essays appear in this issue and an earlier issue of this journal). This response first explains crucial features of the theory of free will of the book, including the notion of ultimate responsibility.The paper then answers objections of Haji and Mele that the occurrence of undetermined choices would be matters of luck or chance, and (...)
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  43. Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke: Self-Interest, Desire, and Divine Impassibility.John J. Tilley - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (3):315-330.
    In this article I address a puzzle about one of Francis Hutcheson’s objections to psychological egoism. The puzzle concerns his premise that God receives no benefit from rewarding the virtuous. Why, in the early editions of his Inquiry Concerning Virtue, does Hutcheson leave this premise undefended? And why, in the later editions, does he continue to do so, knowing that in 1726 John Clarke of Hull had subjected the premise to plausible criticism, geared to the very audience for whom (...)
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  44.  43
    Clarke Against Spinoza on the Manifest Diversity of the World.Timothy Yenter - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):260-280.
    Samuel Clarke was one of Spinoza's earliest and fiercest opponents in England. I uncover three related Clarkean arguments against Spinoza's metaphysic that deserve more attention from readers today. Collectively, these arguments draw out a tension at the very heart of Spinoza's rationalist system. From the conjunction of a necessary being who acts necessarily and the principle of sufficient reason, Clarke reasons that there could be none of the diversity we find in the universe. In doing so, Clarke (...)
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  45. Hume’s Treatise and the Clarke-Collins Controversy.Paul Russell - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (1):95-115.
    The philosophy of Samuel Clarke is of central importance to Hume’s Treatise. Hume’s overall attitude to Clarke’s philosophy may be characterized as one of systematic scepticism. The general significance of this is that it sheds considerable light on Hume’s fundamental “atheistic” or anti-Christian intentions in the Treatise. These are all claims that I have argued for elsewhere.’ In this paper I am concerned to focus on a narrower aspect of this relationship between the philosophies of Clarke and (...)
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  46. The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke-Collins Correspondenc.Marleen Rozemond - 2008 - In Tom Lennon & Robert Stainton (eds.), The Achilles of Rational Psychology.
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think, or be conscious. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the subject of the mental against Anthony Collins’ materialism. This paper examines important assumptions about the nature of body that play a role in their debate. Clarke argued that consciousness requires an “individual being”, an entity with some sort of significant unity as its subject. They (...)
     
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  47.  31
    Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter & Ezio Vailati - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First published Sat Apr 5, 2003; most recent substantive revision Wed Aug 22, 2018. -/- Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) was the most influential British philosopher in the generation between Locke and Berkeley. His philosophical interests were mostly in metaphysics, theology, and ethics.
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  48.  34
    Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'.David Saunders & Ian Hunter - 2003 - History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core (...)
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  49.  21
    The Unboundedness of the Plain; or the Ubiquity of Lilliput? How to Do Things with Thompson Clarke?Kelly Dean Jolley & Keren Gorodeisky - 2014 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 4 (3-4):225-262.
    In this essay, we focus primarily on Moore’s “Proof of an External World” and Kant’s “Refutation of Idealism.” We are not exactly commenting on Clarke’s “The Legacy of Skepticism,” interpreting it, although what we do involves us in (some of) that. Instead of directly commenting on it, we do things with Legacy; we read Moore’s Proof and Kant’s Refutation with Clarke in mind. And by way of doing this, we bring onto the stage a post-Legacy Moore, and a (...)
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  50. Friends Over the Ocean Andrew Lang's American Correspondents 1881-1912.Andrew Lang & Marysa Demoor - 1989 - Rijksuniversiteit Te Gent.
     
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