Results for 'Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus'

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  1.  22
    National Standards for Public Involvement in Research: Missing the Forest for the Trees.Matthew S. McCoy, Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Phoebe Friesen, Michael Dunn, Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus, Leah Rand & Mark Sheehan - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):801-804.
    Biomedical research funding bodies across Europe and North America increasingly encourage—and, in some cases, require—investigators to involve members of the public in funded research. Yet there remains a striking lack of clarity about what ‘good’ or ‘successful’ public involvement looks like. In an effort to provide guidance to investigators and research organisations, representatives of several key research funding bodies in the UK recently came together to develop the National Standards for Public Involvement in Research. The Standards have critical implications for (...)
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  2.  17
    A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Charles H. Norell, Phyllis Illari, Brendan Clarke & Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):35-42.
    As the usual regulatory framework did not fit well during the last Ebola outbreak, innovative thinking still needed. In the absence of an outbreak, randomised controlled trials of clinical efficacy in humans cannot be done, while during an outbreak such trials will continue to face significant practical, philosophical, and ethical challenges. This article argues that researchers should also test the safety and effectiveness of novel vaccines in wild apes by employing a pluralistic approach to evidence. There are three reasons to (...)
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  3.  23
    Selecting the Right Tool For the Job.Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):4-10.
    There are competing ethical concerns when it comes to designing any clinical research study. Clinical trials of possible treatments for Ebola virus are no exception. If anything, the competing ethical concerns are exacerbated in trying to find answers to a deadly, rapidly spreading, infectious disease. The primary goal of current research is to identify experimental therapies that can cure Ebola or cure it with reasonable probability in infected individuals. Pursuit of that goal must be methodologically sound, practical and consistent with (...)
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  4.  18
    The Perfect Must Not Overwhelm the Good: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Selecting the Right Tool For the Job”.Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):W8 - W10.
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  5.  13
    Community Engagement and Field Trials of Genetically Modified Insects and Animals.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):25-36.
    New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally—and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States—of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives. (...)
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  6.  30
    Improving Third-Year Medical Students' Competency in Clinical Moral Reasoning: Two Interventions.Paul J. Cummins, Katherine J. Mendis, Robert Fallar, Amanda Favia, Lily Frank, Carolyn Plunkett, Nada Gligorov & Rosamond Rhodes - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):140-148.
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  7.  13
    Gene Doping—in Animals? Ethical Issues at the Intersection of Animal Use, Gene Editing, and Sports Ethics.Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Brendan Parent - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (1):26-39.
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  8.  10
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals”.Carolyn P. Neuhaus, Brendan Clarke, Phyllis Illari, Charles H. Norell & Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):W8-W9.
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  9.  1
    Reevaluating Benefits in the Moral Justification of Animal Research: A Comment on “Necessary Conditions for Morally Responsible Animal Research”.Matthias Eggel, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Herwig Grimm - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):131-143.
    :In a recent paper in Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics on the necessary conditions for morally responsible animal research David DeGrazia and Jeff Sebo claim that the key requirements for morally responsible animal research are an assertion of sufficient net benefit, a worthwhile-life condition, and a no-unnecessary-harm condition. With regards to the assertion of sufficient net benefit, the authors claim that morally responsible research offers unique benefits to humans that outweigh the costs and harms to humans and animals. In this (...)
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  10.  13
    Ethical Issues When Modelling Brain Disorders Innon-Human Primates.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):323-327.
    Non-human animal models of human diseases advance our knowledge of the genetic underpinnings of disease and lead to the development of novel therapies for humans. While mice are the most common model organisms, their usefulness is limited. Larger animals may provide more accurate and valuable disease models, but it has, until recently, been challenging to create large animal disease models. Genome editors, such as Clustered Randomised Interspersed Palindromic Repeat, meet some of these challenges and bring routine genome engineering of larger (...)
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  11.  6
    Personalized Medicine Is the Postgenomic Condition.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):46-47.
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  12.  7
    Global Bioethics.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (6):inside front cover-inside front.
    This August, I participated in the conference “Genome Editing: Biomedical and Ethical Perspectives,” hosted by the Center for the Study of Bioethics at the University of Belgrade and cosponsored by the Division of Medical Ethics of NYU Langone Health and The Hastings Center. The prime minister of Serbia, Ana Brnabić, spoke of the significance of bringing together an international community of bioethicists, acknowledging that ethical, social, and legal issues surrounding gene editing technologies transcend national boundaries. Europe's Oviedo Convention prohibits human (...)
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  13.  3
    Can Unwilling Addicts Provide Informed Consent to Ongoing Deep Brain Stimulation of Reward Centers?Carolyn Plunkett - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (2):52-54.
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  14.  44
    Father Neuhaus’s Final Thoughts on Chesterton.Richard John Neuhaus - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):204-206.
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  15.  31
    Richard Neuhaus's Reply to J. M. Purcell.Richard John Neuhaus - 1988 - The Chesterton Review 14 (2):359-360.
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  16. Learning the Arabic Plural: The Case for Minority Default Mappings in Connectionist Networks. Neil Forrester Kim Plunkett.Neil Forrester Kim Plunkett - 1994 - In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum. pp. 319.
  17.  31
    Learning From a Connectionist Model of the Acquisition of the English Past Tense.Kim Plunkett & Virginia A. Marchman - 1996 - Cognition 61 (3):299-308.
    Comments on G. Marcus' criticisms (see record 1996-24670-001) of K. Plunkett's and V. Marcham's (see record 1994-35650-001) connectionist account of the acquisition of the English past tense (verb morphology). The original model is reviewed. Graphing, overregularization, and other criticisms are addressed (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved).
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  18. A Philosophy of the Essay: Scepticism, Experience, and Style.Erin S. Plunkett - 2018 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Erin Plunkett draws from both analytic and continental sources to argue for the philosophical relevance of style, making the case that the essay form is uniquely suited to address the sceptical problem. The authors examined here-Montaigne, Hume, the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard and Stanley Cavell-bring into relief the relationship between scepticism and ordinary life and situate the will to know within a broader frame of meaningful human activity. The formal features of the essay call attention to time, subjectivity, and (...)
     
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  19. Disagreement and the Semantics of Normative and Evaluative Terms.David Plunkett & Timothy Sundell - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13.
    In constructing semantic theories of normative and evaluative terms, philosophers have commonly deployed a certain type of disagreement -based argument. The premise of the argument observes the possibility of genuine disagreement between users of a certain normative or evaluative term, while the conclusion of the argument is that, however differently those speakers employ the term, they must mean the same thing by it. After all, if they did not, then they would not really disagree. We argue that in many of (...)
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  20. Conceptual Ethics I.Alexis Burgess & David Plunkett - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (12):1091-1101.
    Which concepts should we use to think and talk about the world and to do all of the other things that mental and linguistic representation facilitates? This is the guiding question of the field that we call ‘conceptual ethics’. Conceptual ethics is not often discussed as its own systematic branch of normative theory. A case can nevertheless be made that the field is already quite active, with contributions coming in from areas as diverse as fundamental metaphysics and social/political philosophy. In (...)
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  21. Which Concepts Should We Use?: Metalinguistic Negotiations and The Methodology of Philosophy.David Plunkett - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (7-8):828-874.
    This paper is about philosophical disputes where the literal content of what speakers communicate concerns such object-level issues as ground, supervenience, or real definition. It is tempting to think that such disputes straightforwardly express disagreements about these topics. In contrast to this, I suggest that, in many such cases, the disagreement that is expressed is actually one about which concepts should be employed. I make this case as follows. First, I look at non-philosophical, everyday disputes where a speaker employs a (...)
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  22.  10
    U-Shaped Learning and Frequency Effects in a Multi-Layered Perception: Implications for Child Language Acquisition.Kim Plunkett & Virginia Marchman - 1991 - Cognition 38 (1):43-102.
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  23.  49
    Relations in Biomedical Ontologies.Barry Smith, Werner Ceusters, Bert Klagges, Jacob Köhler, Anand Kuma, Jane Lomax, Chris Mungall, , Fabian Neuhaus, Alan Rector & Cornelius Rosse - 2005 - Genome Biology 6 (5):R46.
    To enhance the treatment of relations in biomedical ontologies we advance a methodology for providing consistent and unambiguous formal definitions of the relational expressions used in such ontologies in a way designed to assist developers and users in avoiding errors in coding and annotation. The resulting Relation Ontology can promote interoperability of ontologies and support new types of automated reasoning about the spatial and temporal dimensions of biological and medical phenomena.
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  24. Conceptual Ethics II.Alexis Burgess & David Plunkett - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (12):1102-1110.
    Which concepts should we use to think and talk about the world, and to do all of the other things that mental and linguistic representation facilitates? This is the guiding question of the field that we call ‘conceptual ethics’. Conceptual ethics is not often discussed as its own systematic branch of normative theory. A case can nevertheless be made that the field is already quite active, with contributions coming in from areas as diverse as fundamental metaphysics and social/political philosophy. In (...)
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  25. Depth and Deference: When and Why We Attribute Understanding.Daniel A. Wilkenfeld, Dillon Plunkett & Tania Lombrozo - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):373-393.
    Four experiments investigate the folk concept of “understanding,” in particular when and why it is deployed differently from the concept of knowledge. We argue for the positions that people have higher demands with respect to explanatory depth when it comes to attributing understanding, and that this is true, in part, because understanding attributions play a functional role in identifying experts who should be heeded with respect to the general field in question. These claims are supported by our findings that people (...)
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  26.  30
    Labels Can Override Perceptual Categories in Early Infancy.Kim Plunkett, Jon-Fan Hu & Leslie B. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):665-681.
  27.  81
    Conceptual History, Conceptual Ethics, and the Aims of Inquiry: A Framework for Thinking About the Relevance of the History/Genealogy of Concepts to Normative Inquiry.David Plunkett - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    In this paper, I argue that facts about the history or genealogy of concepts (facts about what I call “conceptual history”) can matter for normative inquiry. I argue that normative and evaluative issues about concepts (such as issues about which concepts an agent should use, in a given context) matter for all forms of inquiry (including normative inquiry) and that conceptual history can help us when we engage in thinking about these normative and evaluative issues (which I call issues in (...)
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  28.  34
    From Rote Learning to System Building: Acquiring Verb Morphology in Children and Connectionist Nets.Kim Plunkett & Virginia Marchman - 1993 - Cognition 48 (1):21-69.
  29.  24
    A Neurocomputational Account of Taxonomic Responding and Fast Mapping in Early Word Learning.Julien Mayor & Kim Plunkett - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (1):1-31.
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  30.  14
    The Shape of Words in the Brain.Vanja Kovic, Kim Plunkett & Gert Westermann - 2010 - Cognition 114 (1):19-28.
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  31. Non-Consequentialism Demystified.Howard Nye, David Plunkett & John Ku - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    Morality seems important, in the sense that there are practical reasons — at least for most of us, most of the time — to be moral. A central theoretical motivation for consequentialism is that it appears clear that there are practical reasons to promote good outcomes, but mysterious why we should care about non-consequentialist moral considerations or how they could be genuine reasons to act. In this paper we argue that this theoretical motivation is mistaken, and that because many arguments (...)
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  32. Legal Positivism and the Moral Aim Thesis.David Plunkett - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (3):563-605.
    According to Scott Shapiro’s Moral Aim Thesis, it is an essential feature of the law that it has a moral aim. In short, for Shapiro, this means that the law has the constitutive aim of providing morally good solutions to morally significant social problems in cases where other, less formal ways of guiding the activity of agents won’t work. In this article, I argue that legal positivists should reject the Moral Aim Thesis. In short, I argue that although there are (...)
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  33.  34
    A Positivist Route for Explaining How Facts Make Law.David Plunkett - 2012 - Legal Theory 18 (2):139-207.
    In “How Facts Make Law” and other recent work, Mark Greenberg argues that legal positivists cannot develop a viable constitutive account of law that meets what he calls the “the rational-relation requirement.” He argues that this gives us reason to reject positivism in favor of antipositivism. In this paper, I argue that Greenberg is wrong: positivists can in fact develop a viable constitutive account of law that meets the rational-relation requirement. I make this argument in two stages. First, I offer (...)
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  34.  25
    The Role of Novelty in Early Word Learning.Emily Mather & Kim Plunkett - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1157-1177.
    What mechanism implements the mutual exclusivity bias to map novel labels to objects without names? Prominent theoretical accounts of mutual exclusivity (e.g., Markman, 1989, 1990) propose that infants are guided by their knowledge of object names. However, the mutual exclusivity constraint could be implemented via monitoring of object novelty (see Merriman, Marazita, & Jarvis, 1995). We sought to discriminate between these contrasting explanations across two preferential looking experiments with 22-month-olds. In Experiment 1, infants viewed three objects: one name-known, two name-unknown. (...)
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  35.  19
    A Connectionist Model of English Past Tense and Plural Morphology.Kim Plunkett & Patrick Juola - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):463-490.
    The acquisition of English noun and verb morphology is modeled using a single-system connectionist network. The network is trained to produce the plurals and past tense forms of a large corpus of monosyllabic English nouns and verbs. The developmental trajectory of network performance is analyzed in detail and is shown to mimic a number of important features of the acquisition of English noun and verb morphology in young children. These include an initial error-free period of performance on both nouns and (...)
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  36. Constructing Protagorean Objectivity.Errnanno Bencivenga, Nadeem Hussein, Christine Korsgaard, James Lenman, Peter de Mameffe, James Nickel, David Plunkett, James Pryor, Andrews Reath & Michael Ridge - 2012 - In Jimmy Lenman & Yonatan Shemmer (eds.), Constructivism in Practical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    At least since the late Early Modern period, the Holy Grail of ethics, for many philosophers, has been to say how ethical values could have a kind of protagorean objectivity: values are to be both fully objective as values and yet depend on us by their very nature. More than any other contemporary foundational approach it is “constructivist” theories, such as those due to Rawls, Scanlon, and Korsgaard, which have consciously sought to explain how protagorean objectivity is a real possibility. (...)
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  37.  50
    Citation Counts for Research Evaluation: Standards of Good Practice for Analyzing Bibliometric Data and Presenting and Interpreting Results.L. Bornmann, R. Mutz, C. Neuhaus & HD Daniel - 2008 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 8 (1):93-102.
  38.  64
    Theories of Early Language Acquisition.Kim Plunkett - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):146-153.
  39.  59
    Dworkin's Interpretivism and the Pragmatics of Legal Disputes.David Plunkett & Timothy Sundell - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (3):242-281.
    One of Ronald Dworkin's most distinctive claims in legal philosophy is that law is an interpretative concept, a special kind of concept whose correct application depends neither on fixed criteria nor on an instance-identifying decision procedure but rather on the normative or evaluative facts that best justify the total set of practices in which that concept is used. The main argument that Dworkin gives for interpretivism about some conceptis a disagreement-based argument. We argue here that Dworkin's disagreement-based argument relies on (...)
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  40.  11
    Timing Matters: The Impact of Label Synchrony on Infant Categorisation.Nadja Althaus & Kim Plunkett - 2015 - Cognition 139:1-9.
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  41.  26
    What’s in a Link: Associative and Taxonomic Priming Effects in the Infant Lexicon.Natalia Arias-Trejo & Kim Plunkett - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):214-227.
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  42.  29
    Labels as Features (Not Names) for Infant Categorization: A Neurocomputational Approach.Valentina Gliozzi, Julien Mayor, Jon-Fan Hu & Kim Plunkett - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):709-738.
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  43.  21
    Phonological Priming and Cohort Effects in Toddlers.Nivedita Mani & Kim Plunkett - 2011 - Cognition 121 (2):196-206.
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  44.  26
    On the Relation of Irony, Understatement, and Litotes.Laura Neuhaus - 2016 - Pragmatics Cognition 23 (1):117-149.
    The aim of this paper is to clarify the distinctive and the shared features of the three phenomena: irony, understatement, and litotes. These rhetorical figures have been defined as synonymous, distinct or overlapping in various accounts. This indicates an interrelation but also a need for clearer definitions. Here, each of these rhetorical figures is defined via two jointly necessary conditions. This approach sharpens the categories, enables clear-cut distinctions and helps to explain cases of overlap. German corpus data and examples from (...)
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  45.  58
    A Formal Theory of Substances, Qualities, and Universals.Fabian Neuhaus, Pierre Grenon & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Achille Varzi & Laure Vieu (eds.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Proceedings of the Third International Conference. IOS Press.
    One of the tasks of ontology in information science is to support the classification of entities according to their kinds and qualities. We hold that to realize this task as far as entities such as material objects are concerned we need to distinguish four kinds of entities: substance particulars, quality particulars, substance universals, and quality universals. These form, so to speak, an ontological square. We present a formal theory of classification based on this idea, including both a semantics for the (...)
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  46.  71
    Creating the Ontologists of the Future.Fabian Neuhaus, Elizabeth Florescu, Antony Galton, Michael Gruninger, Nicola Guarino, Leo Obrst, Arturo Sanchez, Amanda Vizedom, Peter Yim & Barry Smith - 2011 - Applied Ontology 6 (1):91-98.
    The goal of the 2010 Ontology Summit was to address the current shortage of persons with ontology expertise by developing a strategy for the education of ontologists. To achieve this goal we studied how ontologists are currently trained, the requirements identified by organizations that hire ontologists, and developments that might impact the training of ontologists in the future. We developed recommendations for the body of knowledge that should be taught and the skills that should be developed by future ontologists; these (...)
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  47. Commentary On the Desire Ofthe Nations.R. J. Neuhaus - 1998 - Studies in Christian Ethics 11 (2):56-61.
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  48. CARO: The Common Anatomy Reference Ontology.Melissa Haendel, Fabian Neuhaus, David Osumi-Sutherland, Paula M. Mabee, José L. V. Mejino Jr, Chris J. Mungall & Barry Smith - 2008 - In Anatomy Ontologies for Bioinformatics: Principles and Practice. Springer. pp. 327-349.
    The Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO) is being developed to facilitate interoperability between existing anatomy ontologies for different species, and will provide a template for building new anatomy ontologies. CARO has a structural axis of classification based on the top-level nodes of the Foundational Model of Anatomy. CARO will complement the developmental process sub-ontology of the GO Biological Process ontology, using it to ensure the coherent treatment of developmental stages, and to provide a common framework for the model organism communities (...)
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  49.  45
    The Planning Theory of Law I: The Nature of Legal Institutions1.David Plunkett - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (2):149-158.
    This paper and its companion provide a general introduction to Scott Shapiro’s Planning Theory of Law as developed in his recent book Legality. The Planning Theory encompasses both an account of the nature of legal institutions and an account of the nature of legal norms. This first paper concerns the account of legal institutions. The second concerns the account of legal norms.
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  50. Expressivism, Representation, and the Nature of Conceptual Analysis.David Plunkett - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 156 (1):15-31.
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