Results for 'Catherine England'

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  1.  2
    The Savings and Loan Debacle.Catherine England - 1993 - Critical Review 7 (2-3):307-319.
    The roots of the savings and loan debacle lie in overregulation of the industry resulting from the attempt to promote widespread home ownership. Actions by policymakers unable to admit earlier mistakes compounded the problem throughout the 1980s. Attempts by political decisionmakers to shift blame to the private sector, coupled with a failure to acknowledge the institutional pressures that led congressmen and S & L owners and managers to act as they did, leave taxpayers vulnerable to the repetition of S & (...)
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  2. David Hume on Religion in England.Religion In England - 1991 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 66 (260):51.
     
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  3.  4
    Catherine Nall, Reading and War in Fifteenth-Century England: From Lydgate to Malory. Cambridge, UK, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer, 2012. Pp. Viii, 197. $90. ISBN: 978-1-84384-324-5. [REVIEW]David J. Hay - 2014 - Speculum 89 (4):1180-1181.
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    Catherine A. M. Clarke,Writing Power in Anglo-Saxon England: Texts, Hierarchies, Economies. Cambridge, UK, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer, 2012. Pp. 191. $99. ISBN: 978-1-84384-319-1. [REVIEW]Elaine Treharne - 2016 - Speculum 91 (2):475-477.
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    Catherine AM Clarke, Literary Landscapes and the Idea of England, 700–1400. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2006. Pp. Xi, 160 Plus Unnumbered Pages. $80. [REVIEW]Kathleen Davis - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):971-972.
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  6.  4
    Catherine Eagleton, Monks, Manuscripts and Sundials: The Navicula in Medieval England. (History of Science and Medicine Library, 13; Medieval and Early Modern Science, 11.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xi, 292; 50 Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $147. [REVIEW]David A. King - 2011 - Speculum 86 (4):1066-1068.
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  7.  3
    Catherine Sanok, Her Life Historical: Exemplarity and Female Saints' Lives in Late Medieval England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007. Pp. Xvii, 256; 1 Black-and-White Figure. $55. [REVIEW]Sherry L. Reames - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):1030-1032.
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  8.  3
    Catherine E. Karkov, Text and Picture in Anglo-Saxon England: Narrative Strategies in the Junius 11 Manuscript. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Paper. Pp. Xii, 225 Plus 48 Black-and-White Plates. $69.95. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Russom - 2003 - Speculum 78 (2):541-542.
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  9. Catherine EAGLETON, Monks, Manuscripts and Sundials: The Navicula in Medieval England.Bakhouche Béatrice - 2013 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 66 (1):215-217.
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  10. Catherine Marshall, Bernard Lightman and Richard England , The Papers of the Metaphysical Society, 1869–1880: A Critical Edition. 3 Vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. Xxiv + 1,288. ISBN 978-0-19-964303-5. £320.00. [REVIEW]Gowan Dawson - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Science 48 (4):705-706.
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  11. Catherine Aubertin and Estienne Rodary (Eds.): Protected Areas, Sustainable Land?: IRD Editions Ashgate, Surrey, England, 2011, 177 Pp, ISBN 978-1409412359 (). [REVIEW]Aakash Goyal - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):311-312.
     
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  12. Catherine Eagleton.Monks, Manuscripts, and Sundials: The Navicula in Medieval England. X + 292 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2010. $147. [REVIEW]Darin Hayton - 2012 - Isis 103 (4):778-779.
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  13. Catherine Eagleton, Monks, Manuscripts and Sundials: The Navicula in Medieval England. Leiden: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xi+292. ISBN 978-90-04-27665-2. €99.00. [REVIEW]Michael H. Shank - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (4):580-581.
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  14. St. Catherine, the Papacy, and England.M. F. S. - 1939 - New Blackfriars 20 (229):288-291.
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  15.  7
    Rosemary Cramp, with Contributions by C. Roger Bristow, John Higgitt, R. C. Scrivener, and Bernard C. Worssam, Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, 7: South-West England. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2006. Pp. Xviii, 446; Frontispiece Map, 28 Black-and-White Figures, 565 Black-and-White Illustrations, and Tables. [REVIEW]Catherine E. Karkov - 2007 - Speculum 82 (4):974-976.
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  16.  5
    The Cult of Saint Thecla in Anglo-Saxon England: The Problem of Aldhelm's Sources.Catherine Franc - 2004 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 86 (2):39-53.
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  17.  3
    Jonathan Good, The Cult of Saint George in Medieval England. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2009. Pp. Xv, 198 Plus 18 Black-and-White Figures; 9 Tables. $95. [REVIEW]Catherine Sanok - 2011 - Speculum 86 (1):204-206.
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  18.  2
    Colum Hourihane, The Processional Cross in Late Medieval England: The “Dallye Cross.” (Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London, 71.) London: Society of Antiquaries of London, 2005. Pp. Ix, 162; 114 Black-and-White Figures. $65. [REVIEW]Catherine E. Karkov - 2006 - Speculum 81 (4):1211-1212.
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  19. Personal names, identity and family in Benedictine Reform England.Catherine Cubitt - 2014 - In Karl Ubl & Steffen Patzold (eds.), Verwandtschaft, Name Und Soziale Ordnung. De Gruyter. pp. 223-242.
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  20. Doctor and Student: Or Dialogues Between a Doctor of Divinity, and a Student in the Laws of England Containing the Grounds of Those Laws, Together with Questions and Cases Concerning the Equity and Conscience Thereof; Also Comparing the Civil, Canon, Common and Statute Laws, and Shewing Wherein They Vary From One Another..Christopher Saint German, Samuel Richardson, Catherine Lintot & John Worrall - 1761 - Printed by S. Richardson and C. Lintot, Law-Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, for J. Worrall, at the Dove in Bell-Yard, Near Lincoln's Inn.
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  21. The Processional Cross in Late Medieval England: The "Dallye Cross"Colum Hourihane.Catherine E. Karkov - 2006 - Speculum 81 (4):1211-1212.
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  22.  33
    Agronomist–Farmer Knowledge Encounters: An Analysis of Knowledge Exchange in the Context of Best Management Practices in England[REVIEW]Julie Ingram - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):405-418.
    This paper explores how knowledge is exchanged between agricultural advisors and farmers in the context of sustainable farming practices in England. Specifically the paper examines the nature of the knowledge exchange at the encounters between one group of advisors, agronomists, and farmers. The promotion of best management practices, which are central to the implementation of sustainable agricultural policies in England, provide the empirical context for this study. The paper uses the notion of expert and facilitative approaches as a (...)
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  23.  17
    Substitute Decision Making in Medicine: Comparative Analysis of the Ethico-Legal Discourse in England and Germany. [REVIEW]Ralf J. Jox, Sabine Michalowski, Jorn Lorenz & Jan Schildmann - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):153-163.
    Health care decision making for patients without decisional capacity is ethically and legally challenging. Advance directives (living wills) have proved to be of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Therefore, academic attention should focus more on substitute decision making by the next of kin. In this article, we comparatively analyse the legal approaches to substitute medical decision making in England and Germany. Based on the current ethico-legal discourse in both countries, three aspects of substitute decision making will be highlighted: (1) (...)
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  24.  7
    Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling.James Lindemann Nelson - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
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  25.  17
    Apophasis as the Common Root of Radically Secular and Radically Orthodox Theologies.William Franke - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):57-76.
    On the one hand, we find secularized approaches to theology stemming from the Death of God movement of the 1960s, particularly as pursued by North American religious thinkers such as Thomas J.J. Altizer, Mark C. Taylor, Charles Winquist, Carl Raschke, Robert Scharlemann, and others, who stress that the possibilities for theological discourse are fundamentally altered by the new conditions of our contemporary world. Our world today, in their view, is constituted wholly on a plane of immanence, to such an extent (...)
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  26.  6
    Felonia Felonice Facta: Felony and Intentionality in Medieval England.Elizabeth Papp Kamali - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (3):397-421.
    This paper explores the meaning of the word “felony” in thirteenth and fourteenth century England, i.e., during the first two centuries of the English criminal trial jury. To compile a working definition of felony, the paper presents examples of the language of felony drawn from literary and religious sources, in addition to considering the word’s more formulaic appearance in legal records. The paper then analyzes cases ending in acquittal or pardon, highlighting the factors that might take a criminal case (...)
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  27.  16
    Religious Hypotheses and the Apophatic, Relational Theology of Catherine Keller.Kirk Wegter‐McNelly - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):758-764.
    In one of its most urgent folds, Catherine Keller's Cloud of the Impossible juxtaposes negative theology with relational theology for the sake of thinking constructively about today's global climate of religious conflict and ecological upheaval. The tension between these two theological approaches reflects her desire to unsay past harmful theological speech but also to speak into the present silences about the possibility of a future that is not only to be feared. Suffusing Keller's Cloud is the related possibility of (...)
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  28.  13
    Aporetic Possibilities in Catherine Keller's Cloud of the Impossible.Carol Wayne White - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):765-782.
    In stressing the beauty of ignorance, of not knowing in the usual manner, Catherine Keller's Cloud of the Impossible evokes the death of a metaphysical uthorial presence and the dissolution of closed systems of meaning. In this article, I view her text as part of a crisis of modernity that challenges dominant theological pathways, on which certain problematic views of the human have been constructed. In my reading, Keller's Cloud enriches humanistic thinking in the West and I explore the (...)
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  29.  23
    The Light of Freedom in the Age of Enlightenment : England and France.Aleksandar Molnar - 2011 - Filozofija I Društvo 22 (2):129-155.
    Although the philosophy of Enlightenment was born in the Netherlands and England in the late 17th and early 18th century, there were considerable problems in defying the freedom. By the mid 18th century, under the influence of „national mercantilism“ , the freedom was perceived in more and more collective terms, giving bith to the political option of national liberalism. That is why in the second half of 18th century this two countries have been progresively loosing importance for the movement (...)
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  30.  19
    Philosophy, Science, and Religion in England, 1640-1700.Richard W. F. Kroll, Richard Ashcraft & Perez Zagorin (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays looks at the distinctively English intellectual, social and political phenomenon of Latitudinarianism, which emerged during the Civil War and Interregnum and came into its own after the Restoration, becoming a virtual orthodoxy after 1688. Dividing into two parts, it first examines the importance of the Cambridge Platonists, who sought to embrace the newest philosophical and scientific movements within Church of England orthodoxy, and then moves into the later seventeenth century, from the Restoration onwards, culminating in (...)
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  31.  8
    Catherine of Siena and the New Evangelization1.J. Cahall - 2016 - New Blackfriars 97 (1067).
    This article shows the relevance of past ages to the current project of the new evangelization. In particular, it presents St. Catherine of Siena as an example of the intuition that saints throughout the history of the Church have had regarding how to undertake the process of evangelization. The concept of the “new evangelization” is outlined by referring to the writings and speeches of Pope St. John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI, and Pope Francis. While covering the basic features (...)
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  32.  6
    Researching Resistance: Campaigns Against Academies in England.Richard Hatcher & Ken Jones - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):329-351.
    This article uses social movement theory to analyse campaigns against a new type of government-sponsored school - the Academy - in four areas of England. It seeks to identify the social composition of anti-Academy campaigns, to track their encounters with proponents of the new schools and to describe the characteristic forms of their campaigning strategies. In doing so, the article aims to help place research into educational opposition and contestation closer to the centre of researchers' agendas.
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  33.  3
    Catherine of Siena and the New Evangelization.Perry J. Cahall - 2016 - New Blackfriars 97 (1069):325-344.
    This article shows the relevance of past ages to the current project of the new evangelization. In particular, it presents St. Catherine of Siena as an example of the intuition that saints throughout the history of the Church have had regarding how to undertake the process of evangelization. The concept of the “new evangelization” is outlined by referring to the writings and speeches of Pope St. John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI, and Pope Francis. While covering the basic features (...)
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  34.  17
    A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England.R. Todd Felton - 2006 - Roaring Forties Press.
    The New England towns and villages that inspired the major figures of the Transcendentalism movement are presented by region in this travel guide that devotes a chapter to each town or village famous for its relationship to one or more of the Transcendentalists. Cambridge, where Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered his powerful speeches is highlighted, as is Walden, where Henry David Thoreau spent two years attuning himself to the rhythms of nature. Other chapters retrace the paths of major writers and (...)
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  35.  21
    Richard Kroll, Richard Ashcraft and Perez Zagorin (eds.), Philosophy, Science and Religion in England, 1640-1700 (Cambridge-New York-Port Chester : Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). [REVIEW]Francoise Monnoyeur - 1993 - Revue D Histoire des Sciences 47 (1):149-150.
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  36.  15
    He Formation of Liberal Education in England and Scotland.Heinz Rhyn - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):5-14.
    The concept of the artes liberales originates in antiquity and was, especially in the Anglo-Saxon area and during the 17th and 18th centuries, remodelled into a socially, educationally, and politically modern educational concept. In this process, the progress within the empirical sciences and the formation of an early civil public are of the utmost importance. In the course of these transformations, the absolute force of church and state is called into question; educational concepts which have to be called modern emerge (...)
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  37. New England Transcendentalism and St. Louis Hegelianism.Henry A. Pochmann - 1948 - New York: Haskell House.
  38.  3
    Land and Power From Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England?John Moreland - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (1):175-193.
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  39. Transcendentalism in New England.Octavius Brooks Frothingham - 1959 - Gloucester, Mass., P. Smith.
  40. Emerson: A Statement of New England Transcendentalism as Expressed in the Philosophy of its Chief Exponent.Henry David Gray - 1917 - Norwood Editions.
     
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  41. Re-Thinking Atonement in Jonathan Edwards and New England Theology.S. Mark Hamilton - 2017 - Perichoresis 15 (1):85-99.
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  42. French Philosophers and New-England Transcendentalism.Walter Leatherbee Leighton - 1908 - New York: Greenwood Press.
  43.  2
    The Development of an Animal Welfare Impact Assessment Tool and Its Application to Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Control in England.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):485-510.
    Bovine tuberculosis is a controversial animal health policy issue in England, which impacts farmers, the public, cattle and badgers. Badgers act as a wildlife reservoir of disease. Policy options for badger control include do nothing, badger culling, and badger vaccination. This paper argues for mandatory Animal Welfare Impact Assessment for all policy that significantly affects sentient animals. AWIA includes species description, and AWIA analysis stages. In this paper, AWIA is applied to impacts of bovine TB policy options on cattle (...)
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  44.  1
    Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Culling in England: A Utilitarian Analysis of Policy Options.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):511-533.
    Bovine tuberculosis is an important animal health policy issue in Britain, which impacts farmers, the public, domestic farmed cattle and the wild badger population. The Westminster government’s badger culling policy in England, which began in 2013, has caused considerable controversy. This is in part because the Independent Scientific Group advised against culling, based on the Randomised Badger Culling Trial. Those opposed to badger culling support more stringent cattle-based measures and the vaccination of badgers. This paper argues for ethical analysis (...)
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  45.  1
    Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Culling in England: An Animal Rights-Based Analysis of Policy Options.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):535-550.
    Bovine tuberculosis is an important and controversial animal health policy issue in England, which impacts humans, cattle and badgers. The government policy of badger culling has led to widespread opposition, in part due to the conclusions of a large field trial recommending against culling, and in part because badgers are a cherished wildlife species. Animal rights theorists argue that sentient nonhumans should be accorded fundamental rights against killing and suffering. In bovine TB policy, however, pro-culling actors claim that badgers (...)
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  46. The Locals Love to Jig: A Baggee's Guide to New England Climbing.Mark Colyvan - unknown
    The recent publication of a couple of guidebooks to some of the many crags around Armidale (in the New England area of northern New South Wales) has resulted in a bit of interest from outof-towners. (So far guides have been published on Dome Wall and Moonbi, arguably the best two crags in the district.) This article aims to give a bit of inside information on some of the climbs and, hopefully, entice some new blood (and splintered bone) to the (...)
     
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  47.  5
    Curriculum Knowledge, Justice, Relations: The Schools White Paper (2010) in England.Christine Winter - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):276-292.
    In this article I begin by discussing the persistent problem of relations between educational inequality and the attainment gap in schools. Because benefits accruing from an education are substantial, the ‘gap’ leads to large disparities in the quality of life many young people can expect to experience in the future. Curriculum knowledge has been a focus for debate in England in relation to educational equality for over 40 years. Given the contestation surrounding views about curriculum knowledge and equality I (...)
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  48.  36
    August in England.Keith Tester - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 109 (1):4-10.
    In early August 2011, disturbances broke out in a number of English cities. What happened was broadcast globally, and all of a sudden it seemed as if all of the country was about to burst into flames. This short paper is offered by way of a ‘letter’ from England. It was written in late August 2011 and is an initial attempt to develop an understanding of why the disturbances broke out, what motivated the people who were involved and, indeed, (...)
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  49.  26
    'Equal Though Different': Laboratories, Museums and the Institutional Development of Biology in Late-Victorian Northern England.Alison Kraft & Samuel J. M. M. Alberti - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):203-236.
    Traditional accounts of the emergence of professional biology have privileged not only metropolis over province, but research over teaching and laboratory over museum. This paper seeks to supplement earlier studies of the ‘transformation of biology’ in the late nineteenth century by exploring in detail the developments within three biology departments in Northern English civic colleges. By outlining changes in the teaching practices, research topics and the accommodation of the departments, the authors demonstrate both locally contingent factors in their development and (...)
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  50.  2
    Variation in University Research Ethics Review: Reflections Following an Inter-University Study in England.Claudia Vadeboncoeur, Nick Townsend, Charlie Foster & Mark Sheehan - 2016 - Research Ethics 12 (4):217-233.
    Conducting large multi-site research within universities highlights inconsistencies between universities in approaches, requirements and responses of research ethics committees. Within the context of a social science research study, we attempted to obtain ethical approval from 101 universities across England to recruit students for a short online survey. We received varied responses from research ethics committees of different universities with the steps to obtaining ethics approval ranging from those that only required proof of approval from our home institution, to universities (...)
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