Results for 'David H. Sharp'

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  1.  60
    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox Re-Examined.David H. Sharp - 1961 - Philosophy of Science 28 (3):225-233.
    This paper discusses the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox from a new point of view. In section II, the arguments by which Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen reach their paradoxical conclusions are presented. They are found to rest on two critical assumptions: (a) that before a measurement is made on a system consisting of two non-interacting but correlated sub-systems, the state of the entire system is exactly represented by: ψ a (r̄ 1 ,r̄ 2 )=∑ η a η τ η (r̄ 1 ,r̄ 2 (...)
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  2. Syntax, Semantics, and the Problem of the Identity of Mathematical Objects.Gian-Carlo Rota, David H. Sharp & Robert Sokolowski - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (3):376-386.
    A plurality of axiomatic systems can be interpreted as referring to one and the same mathematical object. In this paper we examine the relationship between axiomatic systems and their models, the relationships among the various axiomatic systems that refer to the same model, and the role of an intelligent user of an axiomatic system. We ask whether these relationships and this role can themselves be formalized.
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  3. Intellectual Property: Moral, Legal, and International Dilemmas.John P. Barlow, David H. Carey, James W. Child, Marci A. Hamilton, Hugh C. Hansen, Edwin C. Hettinger, Justin Hughes, Michael I. Krauss, Charles J. Meyer, Lynn Sharp Paine, Tom C. Palmer, Eugene H. Spafford & Richard Stallman - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As the expansion of the Internet and the digital formatting of all kinds of creative works move us further into the information age, intellectual property issues have become paramount. Computer programs costing thousands of research dollars are now copied in an instant. People who would recoil at the thought of stealing cars, computers, or VCRs regularly steal software or copy their favorite music from a friend's CD. Since the Web has no national boundaries, these issues are international concerns. The contributors-philosophers, (...)
     
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  4.  42
    Vague Numbers.David H. Sanford - 2002 - Acta Analytica 17 (2):63-73.
    If there are vague numbers, it would be easier to use numbers as semantic values in a treatment of vagueness while avoiding precise cut-off points. When we assign a particular statement a range of values there is no precise sharp cut-off point that locates the greatest lower bound or the least upper bound of the interval, I should like to say. Is this possible? “Vague Numbers” stands for awareness of the problem. I do not present a serious theory of (...)
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  5.  30
    The Rawlsian View of Private Ordering: Kevin A. Kordana and David H. Blankfein Tabachnick.Kevin A. Kordana - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):288-307.
    The Rawlsian texts appear not to be consistent with regard to the status of the right of freedom of association. Interestingly, Rawls's early work omits mention of freedom of association as among the basic liberties, but in his later work he explicitly includes freedom of association as among the basic liberties. However, freedom of association would appear to have an economic component as well. If one turns to such “private ordering”, we find a similar ambiguity in the Rawlsian texts, as (...)
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  6.  16
    Causation and Intelligibility: David H. Sanford.David H. Sanford - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (267):55-67.
    I shall venture to affirm, as a general proposition which admits of no exception, that the knowledge of this relation is not, in any instance, attained by reasonings a priori, but arises entirely from experience, when we find that any particular objects are constantly conjoined with each other.
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  7.  57
    Philanthropy as Strategy When Corporate Charity “Begins at Home”.David H. Saiia, Archie B. Carroll & Ann K. Buchholtz - 2003 - Business and Society 42 (2):169-201.
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  8.  30
    Review of R Eal Time.David H. Sanford - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (2):289.
  9.  47
    A Learning Algorithm for Boltzmann Machines.David H. Ackley, Geoffrey E. Hinton & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):147-169.
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  10. The Problem of the Many, Many Composition Questions, and Naive Mereology.David H. Sanford - 1993 - Noûs 27 (2):219-228.
    Naive mereology studies ordinary, common-sense beliefs about part and whole. Some of the speculations in this article on naive mereology do not bear directly on Peter van Inwagen's "Material Beings". The other topics, (1) and (2), both do. (1) Here is an example of Peter Unger's "Problem of the Many". How can a table be a collection of atoms when many collections of atoms have equally strong claims to be that table? Van Inwagen invokes fuzzy sets to solve this problem. (...)
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  11. Begging the Question.David H. Sanford - 1972 - Analysis 32 (6):197-199.
    A primary purpose of argument is to increase the degree of reasonable confidence that one has in the truth of the conclusion. A question begging argument fails this purpose because it violates what W. E. Johnson called an epistemic condition of inference. Although an argument of the sort characterized by Robert Hoffman in his response (Analysis 32.2, Dec 71) to Richard Robinson (Analysis 31.4, March 71) begs the question in all circumstances, we usually understand the charge that an argument is (...)
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  12.  82
    Determinates Vs. Determinables.David H. Sanford - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Everything red is colored, and all squares are polygons. A square is distinguished from other polygons by being four-sided, equilateral, and equiangular. What distinguishes red things from other colored things? This has been understood as a conceptual rather than scientific question. Theories of wavelengths and reflectance and sensory processing are not considered. Given just our ordinary understanding of color, it seems that what differentiates red from other colors is only redness itself. The Cambridge logician W. E. Johnson introduced the terms (...)
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  13.  13
    Flow and Structure of Time Experience – Concept, Empirical Validation and Implications for Psychopathology.David H. V. Vogel, Christine M. Falter-Wagner, Theresa Schoofs, Katharina Krämer, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):235-258.
    We present a conceptual framework on the experience of time and provide a coherent basis on which to base further inquiries into qualitative approaches concerning time experience. We propose two Time-Layers and two Time-Formats forming four Time-Domains. Micro-Flow and Micro-Structure represent the implicit phenomenal basis, from which the explicit experiences of Macro-Flow and Macro-Structure emerge. Complementary to this theoretical proposal, we present empirical results from qualitative content analysis obtained from 25 healthy participants. The data essentially corroborate the theoretical proposal. With (...)
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  14.  15
    Disturbed Experience of Time in Depression—Evidence From Content Analysis.David H. V. Vogel, Katharina Krämer, Theresa Schoofs, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  15. The Conscious Self: The Immaterial Center of Subjective States.David H. Lund - 2005 - Humanity Books.
    Self-consciousness and the self -- Diachronic unity, diachronic singularity, and the subject of consciousness -- A modal argument for immateriality -- Intelligibility concerns and causal objections -- Concluding remarks.
     
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  16.  14
    Taboo or Not Taboo: Is That the Question?David H. Spain - 1988 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 16 (3):285-301.
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  17. The Direction of Causation and the Direction of Conditionship.David H. Sanford - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (8):193-207.
    I criticize and emend J L Mackie's account of causal priority by replacing ‘fixity’ in its central clause by 'x is a causal condition of y, but y is not a causal condition of x'. This replacement works only if 'is a causal condition of' is not a symmetric relation. Even apart from our desire to account for causal priority, it is desirable to have an account of nonsymmetric conditionship. Truth, for example, is a condition of knowledge, but knowledge is (...)
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  18.  12
    Flow and structure of time experience – concept, empirical validation and implications for psychopathology.David H. V. Vogel, Christine M. Falter-Wagner, Theresa Schoofs, Katharina Krämer, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-24.
    We present a conceptual framework on the experience of time and provide a coherent basis on which to base further inquiries into qualitative approaches concerning time experience. We propose two Time-Layers and two Time-Formats forming four Time-Domains. Micro-Flow and Micro-Structure represent the implicit phenomenal basis, from which the explicit experiences of Macro-Flow and Macro-Structure emerge. Complementary to this theoretical proposal, we present empirical results from qualitative content analysis obtained from 25 healthy participants. The data essentially corroborate the theoretical proposal. With (...)
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  19.  18
    From Folk Psychology to Cognitive Science: The Case Against Belief.David H. Sanford - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (1):149-154.
  20.  69
    Competing Semantics of Vagueness: Many Values Versus Super-Truth.David H. Saford - 1976 - Synthese 33 (2-4):195--210.
    A semantics of vagueness should reject the principle that every statement has a truth-value yet retain the classical tautologies. A many-value, non-truth-functional semantics and a semantics of super-valuations each have this result. According to the super-valuation approach, 'if a man with n hairs on his head is bald, then a man with n plus one hairs on his head is also bald' is false because it comes out false no matter how the vague predicate 'is bald' is appropriately made precise. (...)
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  21. Fusion Confusion.David H. Sanford - 2003 - Analysis 63 (1):1–4.
    Two fusions can be in the same place at the same time. So long as a house made of Tinkertoys is intact, the fusion of all its Tinkertoys parts coincides with the fusion of it walls and its roof. If none of the Tinkertoys is destroyed, their fusion persists through the complete disassembly of the house. (So the house is not a fusion of its Tinkertoy parts.) The fusion of the walls and roof does not persist through the complete disassembly (...)
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  22.  74
    Locke, Leibniz, and Wiggins on Being in the Same Place at the Same Time.David H. Sanford - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (1):75-82.
    Locke thought it was a necessary truth that no two material bodies could be in the same place at the same time. Leibniz wasn't so sure. This paper sides with Leibniz. I examine the arguments of David Wiggins in defense of Locke on this point (Philosophical Review, January 1968). Wiggins’ arguments are ineffective.
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  23.  15
    Threshold Theories of Signal Detection.David H. Krantz - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (3):308-324.
  24.  9
    On a Convenient Property About $${[\Gamma]^{\Aleph_0}}$$.David Asperó - 2009 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 48 (7):653-677.
    Several situations are presented in which there is an ordinal γ such that ${\{ X \in [\gamma]^{\aleph_0} : X \cap \omega_1 \in S\,{\rm and}\, ot(X) \in T \}}$ is a stationary subset of ${[\gamma]^{\aleph_0}}$ for all stationary ${S, T\subseteq \omega_1}$ . A natural strengthening of the existence of an ordinal γ for which the above conclusion holds lies, in terms of consistency strength, between the existence of the sharp of ${H_{\omega_2}}$ and the existence of sharps for all reals. Also, (...)
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  25.  1
    On a Convenient Property About [FORMULA].David Asperó - 2009 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 48 (7):653-677.
    Several situations are presented in which there is an ordinal γ such that \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\{ X \in [\gamma]^{\aleph_0} : X \cap \omega_1 \in S\,{\rm and}\, ot \in T \}}$$\end{document} is a stationary subset of \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${[\gamma]^{\aleph_0}}$$\end{document} for all stationary \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${S, T\subseteq \omega_1}$$\end{document}. A natural strengthening of the existence of an ordinal γ for which the above (...)
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  26.  36
    Dopaminergic-Neuropeptide Interactions in the Social Brain.David H. Skuse & Louise Gallagher - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):27-35.
  27.  15
    Begging the Question as Involving Actual Belief and Inconceivable Without It.David H. Sanford - 1988 - Metaphilosophy 19 (1):32–37.
    This article answers John Biro's "Knowability, Believability, and Begging the Question: a Reply to Sanford" in "Metaphilosophy" 15 (1984). Biro and I agree that of two argument instances with the same form and content, one but not the other can beg the question, depending on other factors. These factors include actual beliefs, or so I maintain (against Biro) with the help of some analysed examples. Brief selections from Archbishop Whatley and J S Mill suggest that they also regard reference to (...)
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  28.  71
    Infinity and Vagueness.David H. Sanford - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (4):520-535.
    Many philosophic arguments concerned with infinite series depend on the mutual inconsistency of statements of the following five forms: (1) something exists which has R to something; (2) R is asymmetric; (3) R is transitive; (4) for any x which has R to something, there is something which has R to x; (5) only finitely many things are related by R. Such arguments are suspect if the two-place relation R in question involves any conceptual vagueness or inexactness. Traditional sorites arguments (...)
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  29.  17
    Do Infants Possess an Evolved Spider-Detection Mechanism?David H. Rakison & Jaime Derringer - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):381-393.
  30. Causal Necessity and Logical Necessity.David H. Sanford - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 28 (2):185 - 194.
    Myles Brand and Marshall Swain advocate the principle that if A is the set of conditions individually necessary and jointly sufficient for the occurrence of B, then if C is a set of conditions individually necessary for the occurrence of B, every member of C is a member of A. I agree with John Barker and Risto Hilpinen who each argue that this principle is not true for causal necessity and sufficiency, but I disagree with their claim that it is (...)
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  31.  13
    Conjoint-Measurement Analysis of Composition Rules in Psychology.David H. Krantz & Amos Tversky - 1971 - Psychological Review 78 (2):151-169.
  32.  18
    Improvements in Human Reasoning and an Error in L. J. Cohen's.David H. Krantz - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):340-340.
  33. The Primary Objects of Perception.David H. Sanford - 1976 - Mind 85 (April):189-208.
    The primary objects of hearing are sounds: everything we hear we hear by hearing a sound. (This claim differs from Berkeley’s that we hear only sounds and from Aristotle’s that we only hear sounds.) Colored regions are primary objects of sight, and pressure resistant regions are primary objects of perception by touch. By definition, the primary objects of perception are physical. The properties of the primary objects of perception are exactly the properties sense-datum theories attribute to sense-data. Indirect Realism holds (...)
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  34. Inference to the Best Explanation: Does It Track Truth?David H. Glass - 2012 - Synthese 185 (3):411-427.
    In the form of inference known as inference to the best explanation there are various ways to characterise what is meant by the best explanation. This paper considers a number of such characterisations including several based on confirmation measures and several based on coherence measures. The goal is to find a measure which adequately captures what is meant by 'best' and which also yields the truth with a high degree of probability. Computer simulations are used to show that the overlap (...)
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  35.  37
    Borderline Logic.David H. Sanford - 1975 - American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (1):29-39.
    To accommodate vague statements and predicates, I propose an infinite-valued, non-truth-functional interpretation of logic on which the tautologies are exactly the tautologies of classical two-valued logic. iI introduce a determinacy operator, analogous to the necessity operator in alethic modal logic, to allow the definition of first-order and higher-order borderline cases. On the interpretation proposed for determinacy, every statement corresponding to a theorem of modal system T is a logical truth, and I conjecture that every logical truth on the interpretation corresponds (...)
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  36.  83
    A Plea for Pragmatism in Clinical Research Ethics.David H. Brendel & Franklin G. Miller - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):24 – 31.
    Pragmatism is a distinctive approach to clinical research ethics that can guide bioethicists and members of institutional review boards (IRBs) as they struggle to balance the competing values of promoting medical research and protecting human subjects participating in it. After defining our understanding of pragmatism in the setting of clinical research ethics, we show how a pragmatic approach can provide guidance not only for the day-to-day functioning of the IRB, but also for evaluation of policy standards, such as the one (...)
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  37.  7
    Causal Asymmetries.David H. Sanford - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.
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  38. Causal Necessity and Logical Necessity.David H. Sanford - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 33 (2):185 - 194.
    Hume's arguments for the contention that causal necessity precludes logical necessity depend on the questionable principle that a cause must precede its effect. Hobbes' definition of entire cause, although it fails to account for causal priority, is not refuted by Hume. The objections of Myles Brand and Marshall Swain (Philosophical Studies, 1976) to my counterexample against Hume (Philosophical Studies, 1975) are ineffective. Their other objections to my criticisms of their argument against defining causation in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions (...)
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  39. Contraries and Subcontraries.David H. Sanford - 1968 - Noûs 2 (1):95-96.
    If two statements are contraries if and only if they cannot both be true, but can both be false, then some corresponding A and E categorical statements are not contraries, even on the presupposition that something exists which satisfies the subject term. For some such statements are necessarily true and thus cannot be false. There is a similar problem with subcontraries.
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  40. Does Colour Constancy Exist?David H. Foster - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):439-443.
    For a stable visual world, the colours of objects should appear the same under different lights. This property of colour constancy has been assumed to be fundamental to vision, and many experimental attempts have been made to quantify it. I contend here, however, that the usual methods of measurement are either too coarse or concentrate not on colour constancy itself, but on other, complementary aspects of scene perception. Whether colour constancy exists other than in nominal terms remains unclear.
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  41.  70
    Nostalgia for the Ordinary: Comments on Papers by Unger and Wheeler.David H. Sanford - 1979 - Synthese 41 (2):175 - 184.
    Unger claims that we can block sorites arguments for the conclusion that there are no ordinary things only by invoking some kind of miracle, but no such miracle is needed if we reject the principle that every statement has a truth value. Wheeler's argument for the nonexistence of ordinary things depends on the assumptions that if ordinary things exist, they comprise real kinds, and that if ordinary predicates really apply to things, the predicates refer to real properties. If we accept (...)
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  42.  13
    Developing Knowledge of Objects' Motion Properties in Infancy.David H. Rakison - 2005 - Cognition 96 (3):183-214.
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  43. Distinctness and Non-Identity.David H. Sanford - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):269–274.
    The following statement (A) is usually abbreviated with symbols: (A) There are items X and Y, each is F, X is not identical to Y, and everything F is identical to X or is identical to Y. (A) is neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of exactly two distinct things that are F. Some things are neither identical nor distinct. The difference between distinctness and nonidentity makes a difference in asking questions about counting, constitution, and persistence.
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  44.  27
    The Fallacy of Begging the Question: A Reply to Barker.David H. Sanford - 1977 - Dialogue 16 (3):485-498.
    According to John A Barker, whether an argument begs the question is purely a matter of logical form. According to me, it is also a matter of epistemic conditions; some arguments which beg the question in some contexts need not beg the question in every context. I point out difficulties in Barker's treatment and defend my own views against some of his criticisms. In the concluding section, "Alleged difficulties with disjunctive syllogism," I defend the validity of disjunctive syllogism against the (...)
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  45.  15
    The Evidence Suggests We Should Care About Social Inequalities in Health.David H. Rehkopf & Laust H. Mortensen - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):56-58.
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  46. For Facts as Causes and Effects.David H. Mellor - 2004 - In Ned Hall, L. A. Paul & John Collins (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. Cambridge: Mass.: Mit Press. pp. 309--23.
     
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  47.  54
    Problems with Priors in Probabilistic Measures of Coherence.David H. Glass - 2005 - Erkenntnis 63 (3):375-385.
    Two of the probabilistic measures of coherence discussed in this paper take probabilistic dependence into account and so depend on prior probabilities in a fundamental way. An example is given which suggests that this prior-dependence can lead to potential problems. Another coherence measure is shown to be independent of prior probabilities in a clearly defined sense and consequently is able to avoid such problems. The issue of prior-dependence is linked to the fact that the first two measures can be understood (...)
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  48. On the Distinction Between Conscious and Unconscious States of Mind.David H. Finkelstein - 1999 - American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):79-100.
  49.  5
    Truth, Love and Immortality: An Introduction to McTaggart's Philosophy.David H. Sanford - 1982 - Philosophical Review 91 (3):445.
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  50. Chisholm on Brentano's Thesis.David H. Sanford - 1997 - In Lewis Edwin Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of Roderick M. Chisholm. Chicago: Open Court. pp. 25--201.
    Roderick Chisholm provides, in different places, two formulations of Brentano's thesis about the relation between the psychological and the intentional: (1) all and only psychological sentences are intentional; (2) no psychological intentional sentence is equivalent to a nonintentional sentence. Chisholm also presents several definitions of intentionality. Some of these allow that a sentence is intentional while its negation is nonintentional, which ruins the prospects of defending the more plausible and interesting thesis (2). A generalization of the notion of logical independence (...)
     
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