Results for 'Mental Process'

998 found
Order:
See also
  1. Is Attending a Mental Process?Yair Levy - 2019 - Mind and Language 34 (3):283-298.
    The nature of attention has been the topic of a lively research programme in psychology for over a century. But there is widespread agreement that none of the theories on offer manage to fully capture the nature of attention. Recently, philosophers have become interested in the debate again after a prolonged period of neglect. This paper contributes to the project of explaining the nature of attention. It starts off by critically examining Christopher Mole’s prominent “adverbial” account of attention, which traces (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  9
    An Archetypal Mental Coding Process.Robert Langs - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (2):299-307.
    This paper presents evidence for a psychological coding process that meets the criteria that define such processes in organic nature and culture. The recognition of these previously unknown encoding sequences is derived from the recent formulation of an adaptive mental module of the mind—the emotion processing mind—that has evolved to cope with traumatic events and the unique, language derived, explicit human awareness of personal mortality. The emergent awareness of death has served as a selection factor for the evolution (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  23
    Multi-Stage Mental Process for Economic Choice in Capuchins.Camillo Padoa-Schioppa, Lucia Jandolo & Elisabetta Visalberghi - 2006 - Cognition 99 (1):B1-B13.
  4. The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (I).A. M. Bodkin - 1907 - Mind 16 (62):209-228.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Mental Process.J. W. Scott - 1929 - Mind 38 (152):534-536.
  6. Mental Process and the Conscious Quality.John Laird - 1923 - Mind 32 (127):273-288.
  7. Time, Will, and Mental Process.Jason W. Brown - 1996
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  48
    The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (II).A. M. Bodkin - 1907 - Mind 16 (63):362-382.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  25
    Mental Process.Hugh A. Reyburn - 1919 - Mind 28 (109):19-40.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  9
    Are the Origins of Any Mental Process Available to Introspection?Michael D. Rugg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):552-552.
  11. The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought.A. M. Bodkin - 1908 - Philosophical Review 17:105.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. "Meaning" and "Mental Process": Some Demurrals to Wittgenstein.Kenneth T. Gallagher - 1984 - The Thomist 48 (2):249.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Mental Process.H. A. Reyburn - 1919 - Philosophical Review 28:339.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  58
    Mental Capacity, Good Practice and the Cyclical Consent Process in Research Involving Vulnerable People.R. Norman, D. Sellman & C. Warner - 2006 - Clinical Ethics 1 (4):228-233.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 gives statutory force to the common law principle that all adults are assumed to have capacity to make decisions unless proven otherwise. In accord with best practice, this principle places the evidential burden on researchers rather than participants and requires researchers to take account of short-term and transient understandings common among some research populations. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the implications of the MCA 2005 for researchers working with 'vulnerable' (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  14
    Health mental services within educational process.Ximena Cecilia Macaya Sandoval, Claudio Enrique Bustos Navarrete, Silverio Segundo Torres Pérez, Pablo Andrés Vergara-Barra & Benjamín de la Cruz Vicente Parada - 2019 - Humanidades Médicas 19 (1):47-64.
    RESUMEN Introducción: Son escasos los servicios en salud mental dentro del contexto escolar que permitan una integración intersectorial para superar la brecha de falta de asistencia en salud mental en la población infanto - juvenil, aun cuando, es en la escuela donde se detectan mayoritariamente los problemas de salud mental. Objetivo: Comentar el uso de servicios de salud mental en el ambiente escolar en relación con los trastornos mentales y trastornos subumbrales. Método: El presente resultado se (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  12
    Mental Models: Rationality, Representation and Process.D. W. Green - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):352-353.
  17.  14
    Mental Development in the Child and the Race. Methods and Process.James Mark Baldwin - 1895 - Philosophical Review 4 (2):232.
  18.  31
    Mental Competence, Caregivers, and the Process of Consent: Research Involving Alzheimer's Patients or Others with Decreasing Mental Capacity.David E. Guinn - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (3):230-245.
    Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are among the fastest growing health problems in America. Dementia incidence tends to increase with age, and the elderly are the fastest growing segment of the population. Medical and social sciences research on dementia involving demented patients is both ongoing and necessary. However, as noted in a report of the Office for Human Subjects Research, “while research with intellectually impaired people generates valuable … data, it also provides significant ethical challenges.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  4
    A Parallel‐Process Model of Mental Rotation.Brian V. Funt - 1983 - Cognitive Science 7 (1):67-93.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  26
    Protecting or Empowering the Vulnerable? Mental Illness, Communication and the Research Process.Jacqueline M. Atkinson - 2007 - Research Ethics 3 (4):134-138.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  14
    Un Soutien Dans le Processus D’Accompagnement Citoyen : Une Nécessité Pour la Santé Mentale des Accompagnateurs-citoyensProvide Support in the Citizen Accompaniment Process: A Necessity for the Accompanying Citizen Mental Health.Pierre-Yves Therriault & Jacinthe Samuelson - 2015 - Revue Phronesis 4 (1):28.
  22.  10
    Routine Outcome Monitoring and Process Quality in Mental Health Care: A Descriptive Study in Daily Practice.Wim Siebum, Ysbrand J. Pijl & G. Sander de Wolf - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (4):620-625.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  12
    ‘Single’ V. ‘Panel’ Appointed Forensic Mental Observations: Is the Referral Process Ethically Justifiable?Tiaan Schutte & Ugasvaree Subramaney - 2013 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (2):64.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  7
    “The Proof Is in the Pudding”: How Mental Health Practitioners View the Power of “Sex Hormones” in the Process of Transition. Whitehead, Bassett, Franchini & Iacolucci - 2015 - Feminist Studies 41 (3):623.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  4
    Psychophysics and Mental Test Theory. II. The Constant Process.C. Mosier - 1941 - Psychological Review 48 (3):235-249.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  63
    Making It Mental: In Search for the Golden Mean of the Extended Cognition Controversy.Itay Shani - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):1-26.
    This paper engages the extended cognition controversy by advancing a theory which fits nicely into an attractive and surprisingly unoccupied conceptual niche situated comfortably between traditional individualism and the radical externalism espoused by the majority of supporters of the extended mind hypothesis. I call this theory moderate active externalism, or MAE. In alliance with other externalist theories of cognition, MAE is committed to the view that certain cognitive processes extend across brain, body, and world—a conclusion which follows from a theory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  27.  12
    The Spatial Anticipation of the Future in the Homes of Mental Health Service Users.Ian Tucker - 2013 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 14 (1):26 - 40.
    This paper develops an approach to analysing the importance of anticipations of the future on present actions in the lives of mental health service users, for whom sensing stability in the future is important as part of the recovery process. The work of Henri Bergson and Alfred North Whitehead is drawn upon to argue that temporality is understood spatially, and that past and future experience only exist in relation to their shaping of present activity. This process is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  78
    Mental Misrepresentation.J. Christopher Maloney - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (September):445-58.
    An account of the contents of the propositional attitudes is fundamental to the success of the cognitive sciences if, as seems correct, the cognitive sciences do presuppose propositional attitudes. Fodor has recently pointed the way towards a naturalistic explication of mental content in his Psychosemantics (1987). Fodor's theory is a version of the causal theory of meaning and thus inherits many of its virtues, including its intrinsic plausibility. Nevertheless, the proposal may suffer from two deficiencies: (1) It seems not (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  97
    Styles of Mental Representation.Daniel C. Dennett - 1983 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 83:213-226.
  30.  78
    Post-hypnotic suggestion and the existence of unconscious mental activity.Donald Levy - 1983 - Analysis 43 (4):184.
  31.  36
    What Makes a Conscious Process Conscious?Max Velmans - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):43-44.
    This is an open-peer commentary on Newell, B.R. & Shanks, D.R. (2014) Unconscious influences on decision making, BBS, 37:1, pp. 1-61. Newell and Shanks’ critical review considers only a very limited sense in which mental processes can be thought of as either conscious or unconscious and consequently gives a misleading analysis of the role of consciousness in human information processing. This commentary provides an expanded analysis of conscious processing that also reveals the various ways in which mental processes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Concept of Mind.Gilbert Ryle - 1949 - Hutchinson & Co.
    This now-classic work challenges what Ryle calls philosophy's "official theory," the Cartesians "myth" of the separation of mind and matter. Ryle's linguistic analysis remaps the conceptual geography of mind, not so much solving traditional philosophical problems as dissolving them into the mere consequences of misguided language. His plain language and esstentially simple purpose place him in the traditioin of Locke, Berkeley, Mill, and Russell.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1408 citations  
  33. Foundation for a Realist Ontology of Cognitive Processes.David Kasmier, David Limbaugh & Barry Smith - 2019 - In Proceedings of the International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (ICBO), University at Buffalo, NY.
    What follows is a first step towards an ontology of conscious mental processes. We provide a theoretical foundation and characterization of conscious mental processes based on a realist theory of intentionality and using BFO as our top-level ontology. We distinguish three components of intentional mental process: character, directedness, and objective referent, and describe several features of the process character and directedness significant to defining and classifying mental processes. We arrive at the definition of representational (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Mental Reality.Galen Strawson - 1994 - MIT Press.
    Introduction -- A default position -- Experience -- The character of experience -- Understanding-experience -- A note about dispositional mental states -- Purely experiential content -- An account of four seconds of thought -- Questions -- The mental and the nonmental -- The mental and the publicly observable -- The mental and the behavioral -- Neobehaviorism and reductionism -- Naturalism in the philosophy of mind -- Conclusion: The three questions -- Agnostic materialism, part 1 -- Monism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   250 citations  
  35. Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach is that there is a natural domain of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   620 citations  
  36.  70
    Mental Images: A Defence.Alastair Hannay - 1971 - Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  37. Mental Acts.Alfred C. Ewing - 1948 - Mind 57 (April):201-220.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Making Sense of the Mental Universe.Bernardo Kastrup - 2017 - Philosophy and Cosmology 19 (1):33-49.
    In 2005, an essay was published in Nature asserting that the universe is mental and that we must abandon our tendency to conceptualize observations as things. Since then, experiments have confirmed that — as predicted by quantum mechanics — reality is contextual, which contradicts at least intuitive formulations of realism and corroborates the hypothesis of a mental universe. Yet, to give this hypothesis a coherent rendering, one must explain how a mental universe can — at least in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  39. You, Robot.Brian Fiala, Adam Arico & Shaun Nichols - 2014 - In Edouard Machery (ed.), Current Controversies in Experimental Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 31-47.
    How do people think about the mental states of robots? Experimental philosophers have developed various models aiming to specify the factors that drive people's attributions of mental states to robots. Here we report on a new experiment involving robots, the results of which tell against competing models. We advocate a view on which attributions of mental states to robots are driven by the same dual-process architecture that subserves attributions of mental states more generally. In support (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  40.  4
    Decision-Making Capacity to Consent to Medical Assistance in Dying for Persons with Mental Disorders.Louis C. Charland, Trudo Lemmens & Kyoko Wada - 2016 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health:1-14.
    Following a Canadian Supreme Court ruling invalidating an absolute prohibition on physician assisted dying, two reports and several commentators have recommended that the Canadian criminal law allow medical assistance in dying (MAID) for persons with a diagnosis of mental disorder. A key element in this process is that the person requesting MAID be deemed to have the ‘mental capacity’ or ‘mental competence’ to consent to that option. In this context, mental capacity and mental competence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  4
    Decision-Making Capacity to Consent to Medical Assistance in Dying for Persons with Mental Disorders.Louis C. Charland - 2016 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health:1-14.
    Following a Canadian Supreme Court ruling invalidating an absolute prohibition on physician assisted dying, two reports and several commentators have recommended that the Canadian criminal law allow medical assistance in dying (MAID) for persons with a diagnosis of mental disorder. A key element in this process is that the person requesting MAID be deemed to have the ‘mental capacity’ or ‘mental competence’ to consent to that option. In this context, mental capacity and mental competence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Individualism and Psychology.Tyler Burge - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (January):3-45.
  43. The Myth of Cognitive Agency: Subpersonal Thinking as a Cyclically Recurring Loss of Mental Autonomy.Thomas Metzinger - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4:931.
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that, on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that, given empirical constraints, most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analyzed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition - (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  44. Towards a Dual Process Epistemology of Imagination.Michael T. Stuart - 2019 - Synthese:1-22.
    Sometimes we learn through the use of imagination. The epistemology of imagination asks how this is possible. One barrier to progress on this question has been a lack of agreement on how to characterize imagination; for example, is imagination a mental state, ability, character trait, or cognitive process? This paper argues that we should characterize imagination as a cognitive ability, exercises of which are cognitive processes. Following dual process theories of cognition developed in cognitive science, the set (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Mental Time-Travel, Semantic Flexibility, and A.I. Ethics.Marcus Arvan - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-20.
    This article argues that existing approaches to programming ethical AI fail to resolve a serious moral-semantic trilemma, generating interpretations of ethical requirements that are either too semantically strict, too semantically flexible, or overly unpredictable. This paper then illustrates the trilemma utilizing a recently proposed ‘general ethical dilemma analyzer,’ _GenEth_. Finally, it uses empirical evidence to argue that human beings resolve the semantic trilemma using general cognitive and motivational processes involving ‘mental time-travel,’ whereby we simulate different possible pasts and futures. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. Direct Social Perception and Dual Process Theories of Mindreading.Mitchell Herschbach - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:483-497.
    The direct social perception thesis claims that we can directly perceive some mental states of other people. The direct perception of mental states has been formulated phenomenologically and psychologically, and typically restricted to the mental state types of intentions and emotions. I will compare DSP to another account of mindreading: dual process accounts that posit a fast, automatic “Type 1” form of mindreading and a slow, effortful “Type 2” form. I will here analyze whether dual (...) accounts’ Type 1 mindreading serves as a rival to DSP or whether some Type 1 mindreading can be perceptual. I will focus on Apperly and Butterfill’s dual process account of mindreading epistemic states such as perception, knowledge, and belief. This account posits a minimal form of Type 1 mindreading of belief-like states called registrations. I will argue that general dual process theories fit well with a modular view of perception that is considered a kind of Type 1 process. I will show that this modular view of perception challenges and has significant advantages over DSP’s phenomenological and psychological theses. Finally, I will argue that if such a modular view of perception is accepted, there is significant reason for thinking Type 1 mindreading of belief-like states is perceptual in nature. This would mean extending the scope of DSP to at least one type of epistemic state. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea.John Haugeland - 1985 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    The idea that human thinking and machine computing are "radically the same" provides the central theme for this marvelously lucid and witty book on...
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   191 citations  
  48. Mental Time Travel, Somatic Markers and "Myopia for the Future".Philip Gerrans - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):459 - 474.
    Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) are often described as having impaired ability for planning and decision making despite retaining intact capacities for explicit reasoning. The somatic marker hypothesis is that the VMPFC associates implicitly represented affective information with explicit representations of actions or outcomes. Consequently, when the VMPFC is damaged explicit reasoning is no longer scaffolded by affective information, leading to characteristic deficits. These deficits are exemplified in performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49. Can We Perceive Mental States?Eleonore Neufeld - 2020 - Synthese 197 (5):2245-2269.
    In this paper, I defend Non-Inferentialism about mental states, the view that we can perceive some mental states in a direct, non-inferential way. First, I discuss how the question of mental state perception is to be understood in light of recent debates in the philosophy of perception, and reconstruct Non-Inferentialism in a way that makes the question at hand—whether we can perceive mental states or not—scientifically tractable. Next, I motivate Non-Inferentialism by showing that under the assumption (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  3
    Pre-Cueing Effects: Attention or Mental Imagery?Peter Fazekas & Bence Nanay - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    We argue that pre-cueing studies show that perception is cognitively penetrated via mental imagery. It is important to be clear about the relation between attention and mental imagery here. We do not want to question the role of attention in pre-cueing studies. After all, it is attention that is being pre-cued. The pre-cue draws attention to certain features, which via top-down connections induces mental imagery for the pre-cued properties, which, then, after stimulus-presentation, interacts with and influences the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 998