95 found
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  1.  67
    Making Sense of Dignity.Richard Ashcroft - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):679-682.
    In this review of Leon Kass’s Life, liberty and the defense of dignity and Deryck Beyleveld and Roger Brownsword’s Human dignity in bioethics and biolaw. I consider the prospects for a theory of dignity as a basis for bioethics research. I argue that dignity theories are worth exploring in more detail, but that research needs to consider both “antitheory” accounts of the language of bioethics, and to give more weight to accounts of dignity as an outcome of holding positive liberties (...)
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  2.  28
    ‘Autism and the Good Life’: A New Approach to the Study of Well-Being.Raffaele Rodogno, Katrine Krause-Jensen & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):401-408.
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  3.  75
    Current Epistemological Problems in Evidence Based Medicine.R. E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):131-135.
    Evidence based medicine has been a topic of considerable controversy in medical and health care circles over its short lifetime, because of the claims made by its exponents about the criteria used to assess the evidence for or against the effectiveness of medical interventions. The central epistemological debates underpinning the debates about evidence based medicine are reviewed by this paper, and some areas are suggested where further work remains to be done. In particular, further work is needed on the theory (...)
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  4. Equipoise, Knowledge and Ethics in Clinical Research and Practice.Richard Ashcroft - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (3-4):314-326.
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  5.  36
    Fair Process and the Redundancy of Bioethics: A Polemic.Richard Ashcroft - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (1):3-9.
    Queen Mary, University of London, School of Law, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK. Tel: +442078825126, Fax: +442089818733, Email: r.ashcroft{at}qmul.ac.uk ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Recent doctrine in both national and international organisations concerned with public health planning and resource allocation has it that direct ethical justification of substantive decisions is so difficult as to be impossible. Instead, we should agree on criteria of procedural justice and reach decisions whose justification lies in how (...)
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  6.  23
    Constructing Empirical Bioethics: Foucauldian Reflections on the Empirical Turn in Bioethics Research. [REVIEW]Richard E. Ashcroft - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (1):3-13.
    The empirical turn in bioethics has been widely discussed by philosophical medical ethicists and social scientists. The focus of this discussion has been almost exclusively on methodological issues in research, on the admissibility of empirical evidence in rational argument, and on the possible superiority of empirical methods for permitting democratic lay involvement in decision-making. In this paper I consider how the collection of qualitative and quantitative social research evidence plays its part in the construction of social order, and how this (...)
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  7.  21
    Research Ethics Committees: Differences and Moral Judgement.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Richard Ashcroft & Simon Kirchin - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (5):408–427.
  8.  13
    Regulation and the Social Licence for Medical Research.Mary Dixon-Woods & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):381-391.
    Regulation and governance of medical research is frequently criticised by researchers. In this paper, we draw on Everett Hughes’ concepts of professional licence and professional mandate, and on contemporary sociological theory on risk regulation, to explain the emergence of research governance and the kinds of criticism it receives. We offer explanations for researcher criticism of the rules and practices of research governance, suggesting that these are perceived as interference in their mandate. We argue that, in spite of their complaints, researchers (...)
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  9. Principles of Health Care Ethics.Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) - 2007 - Wiley.
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to (...)
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  10.  51
    Is 'Inconsistency' in Research Ethics Committee Decision-Making Really a Problem? An Empirical Investigation and Reflection.E. L. Angell, C. J. Jackson, R. E. Ashcroft, A. Bryman, K. Windridge & M. Dixon-Woods - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (2):92-99.
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) are frequently a focus of complaints from researchers, but evidence about the operation and decisions of RECs tends to be anecdotal. We conducted a systematic study to identify and compare the ethical issues raised in 54 letters to researchers about the same 18 applications submitted to three RECs over one year. The most common type of ethical trouble identified in REC letters related to informed consent, followed by scientific design and conduct, care and protection of research (...)
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  11.  41
    Prenatal Diagnosis and Abortion for Congenital Abnormalities: Is It Ethical to Provide One Without the Other?Angela Ballantyne, Ainsley Newson, Florencia Luna & Richard Ashcroft - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):48-56.
    This target article considers the ethical implications of providing prenatal diagnosis (PND) and antenatal screening services to detect fetal abnormalities in jurisdictions that prohibit abortion for these conditions. This unusual health policy context is common in the Latin American region. Congenital conditions are often untreated or under-treated in developing countries due to limited health resources, leading many women/couples to prefer termination of affected pregnancies. Three potential harms derive from the provision of PND in the absence of legal and safe abortion (...)
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  12.  24
    What is Clinical Effectiveness?Richard Ashcroft - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (2):219-233.
    Clinical trials and other forms of evaluation of medical treatment are held to give an objective assessment of the ‘clinical effectiveness’ of the medical treatments under evaluation. This kind of evaluation is central to the evidence-based medicine movement, as it provides a basis for the rational selection of treatment. The ethical status of randomised clinical trials is widely agreed to depend crucially upon the state of equipoise regarding which of two (or more) treatments is more (or most) effective in a (...)
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  13.  32
    International Research Ethics.Udo Schücklenk & Richard Ashcroft - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):158-172.
  14.  14
    The Ethics and Governance of Medical Research: What Does Regulation Have to Do with Morality?Richard Ashcroft - 2003 - New Review of Bioethics 1 (1):41-58.
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  15.  7
    Law and the Perils of Philosophical Grafts.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):72-72.
    Charles Foster and Jonathan Herring are to be congratulated on their useful presentation of the roles played by concepts of personhood and identity in English medical law.1 However, I fear that the project they have undertaken here is misconceived. It is an interesting and important misconception, which is widely shared in the literature on medical law and ethics; but a misconception it remains. The problem is this. What we call ‘the Law’ is in fact a complex assemblage of institutions, rules, (...)
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  16.  38
    What is Clinical Effectiveness?Richard Ashcroft - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (2):219-233.
    Clinical trials and other forms of evaluation of medical treatment are held to give an objective assessment of the 'clinical effectiveness' of the medical treatments under evaluation. This kind of evaluation is central to the evidence-based medicine movement, as it provides a basis for the rational selection of treatment. The ethical status of randomised clinical trials is widely agreed to depend crucially upon the state of equipoise regarding which of two treatments is more effective in a defined population. However, the (...)
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  17.  24
    Bioethics and Conflicts of Interest.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):155-165.
    Bioethics has been subject to considerable social criticism in recent years. One criticism that has caused particular discomfort in the bioethics community is that bioethicists, because of the way their work is funded, are involved in profound conflicts of interest that undermine their title to be considered independent moral commentators on developments in biomedicine and biotechnology. This criticism draws its force from the assumption that bioethics is, or ought to be, a type of normative social criticism. Versions of this criticism (...)
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  18.  44
    The Psychology of Repugnance and the Duty to Trust.Richard Ashcroft - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):51-52.
  19. The Troubled Relationship Between Bioethics and Human Rights.Richard Ashcroft - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
  20.  6
    Law and the perils of philosophical grafts.R. E. Ashcroft - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1):72-72.
    Charles Foster and Jonathan Herring are to be congratulated on their useful presentation of the roles played by concepts of personhood and identity in English medical law. 1 However, I fear that the project they have undertaken here is misconceived. It is an interesting and important misconception, which is widely shared in the literature on medical law and ethics; but a misconception it remains. The problem is this. What we call ‘the Law’ is in fact a complex assemblage of institutions, (...)
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  21.  23
    Money, Consent, and Exploitation in Research.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):62-63.
  22.  6
    Bioethics and Conflicts of Interest.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):155-165.
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  23.  19
    Face Transplantation: When and for Whom?Peter E. M. Butler, Alex Clarke & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):16 – 17.
  24.  20
    Whither Authenticity?Ainsley J. Newson & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):53 – 55.
  25.  7
    The Declaration of Helsinki.Richard Ashcroft - 2008 - In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 141--148.
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  26. Smoking, Health and Ethics.Richard Ashcroft & A. Dawson - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice:85--99.
     
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  27.  33
    Doing Good by Stealth: Comments on 'Salvaging the Concept of Nudge'.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):494-494.
    In ‘Salvaging the Concept of Nudge’ Yashar Saghai performs an important clarificatory task which certainly advances our philosophical and ethical understanding of nudges in public policy, and in healthcare ethics in particular.1 In this brief commentary I identify some issues which could usefully be taken forward in subsequent discussions.A central difficulty with ethical discussions of nudging is that insufficient care is taken to distinguish two morally important features of nudges. The first, which Saghai very properly concentrates upon, is the mechanism (...)
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  28.  25
    Fair Rationing is Essentially Local: An Argument for Postcode Prescribing.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (3):135-144.
    In this paper I argue that resource allocation in publicly funded medical systems cannot be done using a purely substantive theory of justice, but must also involve procedural justice. I argue further that procedural justice requires institutions and that these must be “local” in a specific sense which I define. The argument rests on the informational constraints on any non-market method for allocating scarce resources among competing claims of need. However, I resist the identification of this normative account of local (...)
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  29.  5
    International Research Ethics.Udo SchÜcklenk & Richard Ashcroft - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):158-172.
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  30.  14
    American Biofutures: Ideology and Utopia in the Fukuyama/Stock Debate.R. E. Ashcroft - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):59-62.
    Francis Fukuyama, in his Our Posthuman Future, and Gregory Stock, in his Redesigning Humans, present competing versions of the biomedical future of human beings, and debate the merits of more or less stringent regimes of regulation for biomedical innovation. In this article, these positions are shown to depend on a shared discourse of market liberalism, which limits both the range of ends for such innovation discussed by the authors, and the scope of their policy analyses and proposals. A proper evaluation (...)
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  31.  15
    Futures for Bioethics?Richard Ashcroft - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):ii-ii.
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  32.  35
    Children's Consent to Research Participation: Social Context and Personal Experience Invalidate Fixed Cutoff Rules.Richard Ashcroft, Trudy Goodenough, Emma Williamson & Julie Kent - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):16 – 18.
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  33.  19
    From Public Interest to Political Justice.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (1):20-27.
    In this paper I examine the ways in which the concept of “public interest” is used in biomedical policymaking to justify the preemption or overruling of decisions made by individuals about their own, their family's, or group interests in the field of healthcare. I discuss six variants of public-interest justification, before going on to consider a concrete example, the use of personal health data in health services management and medical research. I distinguish between the global public interest and particular public (...)
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  34.  42
    Standing Up for the Medical Rights of Asylum Seekers.R. E. Ashcroft - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3):125-126.
    When denial of medical treatment is being used as a lever to move people out of the country, ethicists and healthcare professionals should speak out.An ugly feature of political life throughout the Western world, and beyond, is the suspicion towards, and maltreatment of, migrants from poor to rich countries. People who would otherwise be horrified at being labelled racist nevertheless find it acceptable to support practices which can range from stigmatisation to confinement in brutalising conditions in “reception” and “removal” centres.1–5An (...)
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  35.  44
    Acceptability of Offering Financial Incentives to Achieve Medication Adherence in Patients with Severe Mental Illness: A Focus Group Study.S. Priebe, J. Sinclair, A. Burton, S. Marougka, J. Larsen, M. Firn & R. Ashcroft - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):463-468.
    Background Offering financial incentives to achieve medication adherence in patients with severe mental illness is controversial. Aims To explore the views of different stakeholders on the ethical acceptability of the practice. Method Focus group study consisting of 25 groups with different stakeholders. Results Eleven themes dominated the discussions and fell into four categories: (1) ‘wider concerns’, including the value of medication, source of funding, how patients would use the money, and a presumed government agenda behind the idea; (2) ‘problems requiring (...)
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  36.  15
    Regulating Biomedical Enhancements in the Military.Richard Edmund Ashcroft - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):47 – 49.
  37.  30
    Further Ethical and Social Issues in Using a Cocaine Vaccine: Response to Hall and Carter.R. E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):341-343.
    Evaluation of the potential of a cocaine vaccine requires a detailed understanding of the intended and unintended social consequences of its use. Prospective technology assessment is always difficult, but in the case of treatment and prevention of cocaine addiction we need to understand not only the neuroscience and pharmacology of cocaine addiction, but also social attitudes to drug use and addiction, the social context of drug use, and the factors which make drug use a rational strategy for an addict and (...)
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  38.  69
    Ethics, Philosophy, and Evidence Based Medicine.R. Ashcroft - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):119-119.
    The editors of the symposium hope it will provide a balanced appraisal of evidence based medicine.This symposium is devoted to evidence based medicine and the ethical issues it raises. Since Sir Archie Cochrane’s seminal Nuffield Provincial Hospitals Trust lectures in 1972 and their publication as the Rock Carling monograph for that year, Effectiveness and Efficiency: Random Reflections on Health Services, the idea that medical interventions and health services should be evaluated and selected on the basis of the most reliable evidence (...)
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  39.  9
    Ethics and Health Technology Assessment.Richard Ashcroft - 1999 - Monash Bioethics Review 18 (2):15-24.
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  40.  26
    Solidarity, Society and the Welfare State in the United Kingdom.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (4):377-394.
    Political argument and institutions in the UnitedKingdom have frequently been represented as the products of ablend of nationalistic conservatism, liberal individualism andsocialism, in which consensus has been prized over ideology. This situation changed, as the standard story has it, with therise of Thatcherism in the late 1970s, and again with the arrivalof Tony Blair's ``New Labour'' pragmatism in the late 1990s. Solidarity as an element of political discourse makes itsappearance in the UK late in the day. It has been most (...)
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  41.  28
    Hiv Vaccine Trials: Reconsidering the Therapeutic Misconception and the Question of What Constitutes Trial Related Injuries.Udo Schüklenk & Richard Ashcroft - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (3):ii–iv.
    The ethical challenge is squarely focused on the question of what is owed to participants of vaccine trials who happen to become infected during the course of the trial. Not surprisingly, given the prominence of HIV/AIDS in many parts of the developing world, HIV vaccine trials have become the focal point of this debate. It is worth noting from the outset, however, that the same arguments that apply to HIV vaccines would apply to any number of microbicide trials aimed at (...)
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  42.  48
    Access to Essential Medicines: A Hobbesian Social Contract Approach.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (2):121–141.
    ABSTRACTMedicines that are vital for the saving and preserving of life in conditions of public health emergency or endemic serious disease are known as essential medicines. In many developing world settings such medicines may be unavailable, or unaffordably expensive for the majority of those in need of them. Furthermore, for many serious diseases these essential medicines are protected by patents that permit the patent‐holder to operate a monopoly on their manufacture and supply, and to price these medicines well above marginal (...)
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  43.  14
    The Double Helix 50 Years On: Models, Metaphors, and Reductionism.R. E. Ashcroft - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):63-64.
    Bioethics should update its conception of the geneThe 25th of April marks the 50th anniversary of the publication in Nature of the letter by James Watson and Francis Crick announcing their solution to the structure of deoxyribose nucleic acid .1 By that time, much was known about the role of chromosomes in inheritance, the contribution of DNA to chromosome structure, and the chemistry of DNA.2 The gene concept itself was also well established by then; the principal scientific problem became to (...)
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  44.  21
    Teaching for Patient-Centred Ethics.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):285-293.
    In this paper three models of teaching and learning medical ethics are discussed critically, the traditional and revised vocational models, and the patient-centred model. The autonomy-oriented patient-centred ethics of Beauchamp and Childress is rejected in favour of a hermeneutic practical ethics. A performative conception of ethics teaching is recommended as the most appropriate model for use in the theory and practice of ethics pedagogy.
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  45.  19
    Acceptability of Financial Incentives to Improve Health Outcomes in UK and US Samples.M. Promberger, R. C. H. Brown, R. E. Ashcroft & T. M. Marteau - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):682-687.
    Next SectionIn an online study conducted separately in the UK and the US, participants rated the acceptability and fairness of four interventions: two types of financial incentives and two types of medical interventions. These were stated to be equally effective in improving outcomes in five contexts: weight loss and smoking cessation programmes, and adherence in treatment programmes for drug addiction, serious mental illness and physiotherapy after surgery. Financial incentives were judged less acceptable and to be less fair than medical interventions (...)
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  46.  16
    Some Popular Versions of Uninformed Consent.Jane L. Hutton & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (1):41-53.
    A patient's informed consent is required by the Nuremberg code, and its successors, before she can be entered into a clinical trial. However, concern has been expressed by both patients and professionals about the beneficial or detrimental effect on the patient of asking for her consent. We examine advantages and drawbacks of popular variations on consent, which might reduce the stress on patients at the point of illness. Both informed and uninformed responses to particular trials, and trials in general, are (...)
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  47.  16
    Case Analysis in Clinical Ethics.Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Case Analysis in Clinical Ethics is an eclectic review from a team of leading ethicists covering the main methods for analysing ethical problems in modern medicine. Anneke Lucassen, a clinician, begins by presenting an ethically challenging genetics case drawn from her clinical experience. It is then analysed from different theoretical points of view. Each ethicist takes a particular approach, illustrating it in action and giving the reader a basic grounding in its central elements. Each chapter can be read on its (...)
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  48.  19
    Genotyping the Future: Scientists' Expectations About Race/ Ethnicity After BiDil.Richard Tutton, Andrew Smart, Paul A. Martin, Richard Ashcroft & George T. H. Ellison - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):464-470.
    The ongoing debate about the FDA approval of BiDil in 2005 demonstrates how the first racially/ethnically licensed drug is entangled in both Utopian and dystopian future visions about the continued saliency of race/ethnicity in science and medicine. Drawing on the sociology of expectations, this paper analyzes how scientists in the field of pharmacogenetics are constructing certain visions of the future with respect to the use of social categories of race/ethnicity and the impact of high-throughput genotyping technologies that promise to transform (...)
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  49.  9
    Genotyping the Future: Scientists' Expectations About Race/Ethnicity After BiDil.Richard Tutton, Andrew Smart, Paul A. Martin, Richard Ashcroft & George T. H. Ellison - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):464-470.
    In a recent discussion about how scientific knowledge might potentially change our understanding of the nature and extent of human genetic, cultural, or biological variation, the sociologist David Skinner identified two competing visions of the future: one that was decidedly dystopian, which conjured up a “re-racialized” future, and an opposing utopian future in which the potential for racialized thinking might be finally overcome. We can situate the ongoing debates about the congestive heart failure drug BiDil, approved by the Food and (...)
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  50.  54
    Kant, Mill, Durkheim? Trust and Autonomy in Bioethics and Politics.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (2):359-366.
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