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  1. H. B. Acton (1970). Kant's Moral Philosophy. New York,St. Martin's Press.
  2. Henry E. Allison (1982). Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):271-290.
  3. Diana E. Axelsen (1982). Kant's Theory of Morals. Teaching Philosophy 5 (1):66-69.
  4. Stefano Bacin & Dieter Schönecker (2011). Gründlich zerstört oder gründlich gelesen? Eine Replik auf Brandts alternative Lesart des § 9 der Tugendlehre. Kant-Studien 102 (1):113-119.
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  5. Stefano Bacin & Dieter Schönecker (2010). Zwei Konjekturvorschläge zur Tugendlehre, § 9. Kant-Studien 101 (2):247-252.
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  6. Gary Banham (2007). Practical Schematism, Teleology and the Unity of the Metaphysics of Morals. In Kyriaki Goudeli, Pavlos Kontos & Iolis Patellis (eds.), Kant: Making Reason Intuitive. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this piece I address the question of how the two parts of the *Metaphysics of Morals* are to be related to each other through invocation of the notion of practical schematism. In the process I argue that understanding the notion of moral teleology will help us address the relationship between Kant's principles of right, virtue and the categorical imperative.
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  7. Gary Banham (2003). Kant's Practical Philosophy: From Critique to Doctrine. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The discussion of Kant's Practical Philosophy has been marred by viewing it as purely formalist and centered only on the categorical imperative. This important new study sets out a much more vivid account of the nature and range of Kant's concerns demonstrating his commitment to the notion of rational religion and including extensive discussion of his treatment of evil. Culminating with accounts of property, the nature of right and virtue, this work presents Kant as a vital revolutionary thinker.
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  8. G. Baum, Wg Bayerer & R. Malter (1986). A Newly Discovered Fair-Copy of Kant with Incipits of His 'Zum Ewigen Frieden'. Kant-Studien 77 (3):316-337.
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  9. F. Behrend-Halle (1906). Der Begriff des reinen Wollens bei Kant. Kant-Studien 11 (1-3):109-117.
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  10. Robert J. Benton (1980). Kant's Categories of Practical Reason as Such. Kant-Studien 71 (1-4):181-201.
  11. Robert J. Benton (1978). The Transcendental Argument in Kant's Groundwork. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (3).
  12. Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  13. Gisbert Beyerhaus (1921). Kants ‚Programm' der Aufklärung: aus dem Jahre 1784. Kant-Studien 26 (1-2):1-16.
  14. Daniel Breazeale (2003). Two Cheers for Post-Kantianism: A Response to Karl Ameriks. Inquiry 46 (2):239 – 259.
    Karl Ameriks has recently devoted an entire volume to defending what he calls "orthodox" Kantianism against what he judges to be the "errors" of such post-Kantian idealists as K. L. Reinhold and J. G. Fichte and to exposing what he claims is the frequently unnoticed but always deleterious influence of post-Kantianism upon certain prominent strands of contemporary philosophy. In response, this paper challenges Ameriks' interpretation of Kantianism itself and of the "post-Kantian project", as well as his construal of transcendental idealism. (...)
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  15. Jason Brennan (2008). What If Kant Had Had a Cognitive Theory of the Emotions? In Valerio Hrsg v. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. Walter de Gruyter. 1--219.
    Emotional cognitivists, such as the Stoics and Aristotle, hold that emotions have cognitive content, whereas noncognitivists, like Plato and Kant, believe the emotions to be nonrational bodily movements. I ask, taking Martha Nussbaum's account of cognitivism, what if Kant had become convinced of a cognitive theory of the emotions, what changes would this require in his moral philosophy. Surprisingly, since this represents a radical shift in his psychology, it changes almost nothing. I show that Kant's account of continence, virtue, the (...)
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  16. Malcolm Budd (1998). Delight in the Natural World: Kant on the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Part II: Natural Beauty and Morality. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (2):117-126.
  17. Katerina Deligiorgi (2006). The Role of the 'Plan of Nature' in Kant's Account of History From a Philosophical Perspective. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (3):451 – 468.
  18. Lara Denis (2006). Kant's Conception of Virtue. In Paul Guyer (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this paper, I explicate Kant’s theory of virtue and situate it within the context of theories of virtue before Kant (such as Aristotle, Hobbes, and Hume) and after Kant (such as Schiller and Schopenhauer). I explore Kant’s notions of virtue as a disposition to do one’s duty out of respect for the moral law, as moral strength in non-holy wills, as the moral disposition in conflict, and as moral self-constraint based on inner freedom. I distinguish between Kant’s notions of (...)
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  19. Lara Denis (1997). Kant's Ethics and Duties to Oneself. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321–348.
    This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them-selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant's moral theory is overly demanding or produces agents who are preoccupied with their own virtue. (...)
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  20. David Evans (2008). The Conflict of the Faculties and the Knowledge Industry: Kant's Diagnosis, in His Time and Ours. Philosophy 83 (4):483-495.
    Kant's short essay is a reflection on the contemporary structure of academic studies; he examines this structure in terms of the functions of the State and of the Universities which form part of it. His analysis links the empirical facts with conceptual distinctions, in ways that are familiar from his more general and abstract philosophy. His main aim is to ground a distinction between legitimate and illegitimate ways in which different Faculties of the University may approach intellectual issues that are (...)
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  21. Georg Geismann (1998). Rezension: Immanuel Kant: Die Metaphysik der Sitten. Mit einer Einleitung herausgegeben von Hans Ebeling. Stuttgart: Reclam 1990, 408 Seiten. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 89:90-92.
  22. Pablo Gilabert (2006). Considerations on the Notion of Moral Validity in the Moral Theories of Kant and Habermas. Kant-Studien 97 (2):210-227.
    In what follows I will consider Kant's and Habermas's conceptions of moral validity in a comparative and critical way. First, I will reconstruct Habermas's discursive or deliberative reformulation of Kant's moral theory (sec.1). And, second, I will introduce some comparative critical considerations (2). I will contend that, though much is gained with Habermas's intersubjectivist reformulation of Kant's moral philosophy, some problems emerge that could be treated with the help of certain Kantian insights. I will focus on Kant's and Habermas's strictly (...)
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  23. Patrick Kain (forthcoming). The Development of Kant's Conception of Divine Freedom. In Brandon Look (ed.), Leibniz and Kant. Oxford University Press.
    In his lectures, Kant suggested to his students that the freedom of a divine holy will is “easier to comprehend than that of the human will,”(28:609) but this suggestion has remained neglected. After a review of some of Kant’s familiar claims about the will (in general), and about the divine holy will in particular, I consider how these claims give rise to some initial objections to that conception. Then I defend an interpretation of Kant’s conception of the divine will, and (...)
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  24. Immanuel Kant (1996). Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first English translation of all of Kant's writings on moral and political philosophy collected in a single volume. No other collection competes with the comprehensiveness of this one. As well as Kant's most famous moral and political writings, the Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals, the Critique of Practical Reason, the Metaphysics of Morals, and Toward Perpetual Peace, the volume includes shorter essays and reviews, some of which have never been translated before. The volume has been furnished (...)
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  25. Immanuel Kant (1996). The Metaphysics of Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    The Metaphysics of Morals is Kant's major work in applied moral philosophy in which he deals with the basic principles of rights and of virtues. It comprises two parts: the 'Doctrine of Right', which deals with the rights which people have or can acquire, and the 'Doctrine of Virtue', which deals with the virtues they ought to acquire. Mary Gregor's translation, revised for publication in the Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy series, is the only complete translation of the (...)
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  26. Immanuel Kant (1949/1993). The Philosophy of Kant: Immanuel Kant's Moral and Political Writings. Modern Library.
    Many contemporaries criticized him for smashing the Age of Reason. Goethe, however, remarked that reading a page of Immanuel Kant was like entering a bright and well-lighted room: The great eighteenth-century philosopher illuminated everything he ever pondered. The twelve essays in this volume reveal Kant's towering importance as an ethical and social thinker as well as his enduring influence on the shape of philosophy. Included are excerpts from Dreams of a Visionary, Prolegomena to Every Future Metaphysics, Metaphysical Foundations of Morals, (...)
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  27. Pauline Kleingeld (1998). Kant on the Unity of Theoretical and Practical Reason. Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):500-528.
    In his critical works of the 1780's, Kant claims, seemingly inconsistently, that (1) theoretical and practical reason are one and the same reason, applied differently, (2) that he still needs to show that they are, and (3) that theoretical and practical reason are united. I first argue that current interpretations of Kant's doctrine of the unity of reason are insufficient. But rather than concluding that Kant’s doctrine becomes coherent only in the Critique of Judgment, I show that the three statements (...)
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  28. Heiner Klemme, Manfred Kuehn & Dieter Schönecker (eds.) (2006). Moralische Motivation. Kant Und Die Alternativen. (Kant-Forschungen 16). Meiner Verlag.
    Kant und die Alternativen Heiner F. Klemme Manfred Kühn, Dieter Schönecker. H . Klemme / M. Kühn / D. Schönecker (Hg.) Moralische Motivation Kant und die Alternativen Meiner KANT-FORSCHUNGEN Begründet von Reinhard Brandt und ...
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  29. Stephen Mulhall (1998). Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part II: Kant on Human Nature. Angelaki 3 (1):49 – 58.
  30. Susan Neiman (1994). The Unity of Reason: Rereading Kant. Oxford University Press.
    The Unity of Reason is the first major study of Kant's account of reason. It argues that Kant's wide-ranging interests and goals can only be understood by redirecting attention from epistemological questions of his work to those concerning the nature of reason. Rather than accepting a notion of reason given by his predecessors, a fundamental aim of Kant's philosophy is to reconceive the nature of reason. This enables us to understand Kant's insistence on the unity of theoretical and practical reason (...)
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  31. Onora O'Neill (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature: Onora O'Neill. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):211–228.
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for (...)
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  32. Onora O'Neill (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature: Onora O'Neill. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):211-228.
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for (...)
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  33. Stephen Palmquist (2008). Kant's Moral Panentheism. Philosophia 36 (1):17-28.
    Although Kant is often interpreted as an Enlightenment Deist, Kant scholars are increasingly recognizing aspects of his philosophy that are more amenable to theism. If Kant regarded himself as a theist, what kind of theist was he? The theological approach that best fits Kant’s model of God is panentheism, whereby God is viewed as a living being pervading the entire natural world, present ‘in’ every part of nature, yet going beyond the physical world. The purpose of Kant’s restrictions on our (...)
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  34. John Protevi, The Organism as the Judgment of God: Aristotle, Kant and Deleuze on Nature (That is, on Biology, Theology and Politics).
    God has been called many things, but perhaps nothing so strange as the name of “lobster” which he receives in A Thousand Plateaus.1 Is this simple profanation a pendant to the gleeful anti-clericalism of Deleuze2, for whom there is no insult so wretched as that of “priest”?3 Certainly, on one level. But it is also a clue to Deleuze’s ability to use a traditional concern of theology, the name of God, to intervene in the most basic questions of Western philosophy, (...)
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  35. Shyam Ranganathan (2010). Does Kant Hold That Ought Implies Can? In J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.), Grounding Morality. Routledge. 60.
    Undergraduate students of philosophy are often told that Kant is famous for teaching us that “ought implies can,” and furthermore that this principle implies that it makes no sense to tell someone that they ought to do something if they do not have the ability to execute the action in question. It is thus surprising to find that the words “ought implies can” do not appear conspicuously in popular English translations of Kant’s main moral philosophical texts (such as the Groundwork, (...)
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  36. Claudia M. Schmidt (2005). The Anthropological Dimension of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals. Kant-Studien 96 (1):66-84.
    One of the persistently controversial issues in the discussion of Kant’s moral philosophy is his view of the relation between the metaphysics of morals and human nature.
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  37. Rudolf Schüssler (2012). Kant und die Kasuistik: Fragen zur Tugendlehre. Kant-Studien 103 (1):70-95.
  38. Oliver Sensen (2009). Kant's Conception of Human Dignity. Kant-Studien 100 (3):309-331.
    In this article I argue that Kant's conception of dignity is commonly misunderstood. On the basis of a few passages in the Grundlegung scholars often attribute to Kant a view of dignity as an absolute inner value all human beings possess. However, a different picture emerges if one takes into account all the passages in which Kant uses ‘dignity’. I shall argue that Kant's conception of dignity is a more Stoic one: He conceives of dignity as sublimity ( Erhabenheit ) (...)
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  39. Susan Meld Shell (2009). Kant and the Limits of Autonomy. Harvard University Press.
    Carazan's dream : Kant's early theory of freedom -- Kant's archimedean moment : remarks in observation concerning the feeling of the beautiful and the sublime -- Rousseau, Count Verri, and the true economy of human nature : lectures on anthropology, 1772-1781 -- The paradox of autonomy -- Moral hesitation in religion within the boundaries of bare reason -- Kant's true politics : Völkerrecht in toward perpetual peace and the metaphysics of morals -- Kant as educator : conflict of the faculties, (...)
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  40. Thomas Sturm (2004). Manfred Kuehn: Kant - A Biography. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 54:476-479.
    Review of Manfred Kuehn's outstanding biography on Immanuel Kant. A critical point I raise concerns Kuehn's discussion of Kant's relation to Hume. Scholars are divided over the questions of (a) whether Hume was an actual inspiration for Kant’s Critical philosophy, (b) whether Kant’s defense really addresses Hume’s problem of causality, and, of course, (c) whether Kant’s arguments provide a satisfactory solution to the problem. Sometimes these questions are not clearly distinguished by interpreters, part of the reason Kant scholarship appears so (...)
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  41. Thomas Sturm (1999). Zustand Und Zukunft der Akademie-Ausgabe von Kants Gesammelten Schriften. Kant-Studien 90 (1):100-106.
    The article reports discussions at an international conference of leading Kant scholars held at the University of Marburg (Germany) in 1998. The conference was concerned with both the current state and the need for revisions of the Academy edition of Kant's Gesammelte Schriften as well. As became clear, a complete revision is necessary in the case of Vols. XX-XXIV and XXVII-XXIX, since these can hardly be used for research. Improvements of various extent and content should be attempted in other volumes (...)
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  42. Roger J. Sullivan (1994). An Introduction to Kant's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the most up-to-date, brief and accessible introduction to Kant's ethics available. It approaches the moral theory via the political philosophy, thus allowing the reader to appreciate why Kant argued that the legal structure for any civil society must have a moral basis. This approach also explains why Kant thought that our basic moral norms should serve as laws of conduct for everyone. The volume includes a detailed commentary on Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant's most widely studied (...)
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  43. David Sussman (2008). Shame and Punishment in Kant's Doctrine of Right. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):299–317.
    In the Doctrine of Right, Kant claims that killings motivated by the fear of disgrace should be punished less severely than other murders. I consider how Kant understands the mitigating force of such motives, and argue that Kant takes agents to have a moral right to defend their honour. Unlike other rights, however, this right of honour can only be defended personally, so that individuals remain in a 'state of nature' with regard to any such rights, regardless of their political (...)
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  44. Kevin Thompson (2001). Kant's Transcendental Deduction of Political Authority. Kant-Studien 92 (1):62-78.
    The concept of political authority is the guiding problematic of Kant's mature political philosophy. The proper foundation of state authority lies, according to him, in the idea of an “original contract” and it is only in terms of this regulative principle that the sovereign nature of the state can even be conceived. By placing this doctrine at the core of his political thought Kant appears to affirm the fundamental tenet of the contractarian tradition: legitimate political authority arises only from the (...)
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  45. Jennifer K. Uleman (2000). On Kant, Infanticide, and Finding Oneself in a State of Nature. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 54 (2):173 - 195.
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  46. Helga Varden (2008). Kant's Non-Voluntarist Conception of Political Obligations: Why Justice is Impossible in the State of Nature. Kantian Review 13 (2):1-45.
    This paper presents and defends Kant’s non-voluntarist conception of political obligations. I argue that civil society is not primarily a prudential requirement for justice; it is not merely a necessary evil or moral response to combat our corrupting nature or our tendency to act viciously, thoughtlessly or in a biased manner. Rather, civil society is constitutive of rightful relations because only in civil society can we interact in ways reconcilable with each person’s innate right to freedom. Civil society is the (...)
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  47. Benjamin Vilhauer (2004). Can We Interpret Kant as a Compatibilist About Determinism and Moral Responsibility? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):719 – 730.
    In this paper, I discuss Hud Hudson's compatibilistic interpretation of Kant's theory of free will, which is based on Davidson's anomalous monism. I sketch an alternative interpretation of my own, an incompatibilistic interpretation according to which agents qua noumena are responsible for the particular causal laws which determine the actions of agents qua phenomena. Hudson's interpretation should be attractive to philosophers who value Kant's epistemology and ethics, but insist on a deflationary reading of things in themselves. It is in an (...)
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  48. Burleigh T. Wilkins (2007). Kant on International Relations. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):147 - 159.
    This paper explores some of the problems which arise from Immanuel Kant’s commitment to both human rights and the rights of states. Michael Doyle believed it was contradictory for Kant to defend both human rights and non-intervention by states in the affairs of other states, but I argue that for Kant there was no such contradiction, and I explore Kant’s claim that the state is “a moral personality.” I also discuss Kant’s belief that “Nature guarantees” that perpetual peace will obtain, (...)
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  49. Holly L. Wilson (2006). Kant's Pragmatic Anthropology: Its Origin, Meaning, and Critical Significance. State University of New York Press.
    Kant's theory of human nature is explicated in detail. First book with systematic interpretation of Kant's pragmatic anthropology.
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  50. Holly L. Wilson (1997). Kant and Ecofeminism. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature.
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