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  1. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  2. R. Lanier Anderson (2008). Review: Comments on Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgment. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 137 (1):91-108.
    Martin offers an intriguing account of nineteenth century challenges to the traditional theory of judgment as a synthesis of subject and predicate (the synthesis theory)--criticisms motivated largely by the problem posed by existential judgments, which need not have two terms at all. Such judgments led to a theory of "thetic" judgments, whose essential feature is to "posit" something, rather than to combine terms (as in synthetic judgment). I argue, however, that Kant's official definition of judgment already implicitly recognizes the importance (...)
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  3. R. Lanier Anderson (2005). The Wolffian Paradigm and its Discontent: Kant's Containment Definition of Analyticity in Historical Context. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (1):22-74.
    I defend Kant’s definition of analyticity in terms of concept “containment”, which has engendered widespread scepticism. Kant deployed a clear, technical notion of containment based on ideas standard within traditional logic, notably genus/species hierarchies formed via logical division. Kant’s analytic/synthetic distinction thereby undermines the logico-metaphysical system of Christian Wolff, showing that the Wolffian paradigm lacks the expressive power even to represent essential knowledge, including elementary mathematics, and so cannot provide an adequate system of philosophy. The results clarify the extent to (...)
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  4. R. Lanier Anderson (2004). It Adds Up After All: Kant's Philosophy of Arithmetic in Light of the Traditional Logic. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):501–540.
    Officially, for Kant, judgments are analytic iff the predicate is "contained in" the subject. I defend the containment definition against the common charge of obscurity, and argue that arithmetic cannot be analytic, in the resulting sense. My account deploys two traditional logical notions: logical division and concept hierarchies. Division separates a genus concept into exclusive, exhaustive species. Repeated divisions generate a hierarchy, in which lower species are derived from their genus, by adding differentia(e). Hierarchies afford a straightforward sense of containment: (...)
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  5. Richard E. Aquila (1988). Self-Consciousness, Self-Determination, and Imagination in Kant. Topoi 7 (1):65-79.
    I argue for a basically Sartrean approach to the idea that one's self-concept, and any form of knowledge of oneself as an individual subject, presupposes concepts and knowledge about other things. The necessity stems from a pre-conceptual structure which assures that original self-consciousness is identical with one's consciousness of objects themselves. It is not a distinct accomplishment merely dependent on the latter. The analysis extends the matter/form distinction to concepts. It also requires a distinction between two notions of consciousness: one (...)
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  6. Richard E. Aquila (1974). Kant's Theory of Concepts. Kant-Studien 65 (1-4):1-19.
  7. Tom Bailey (2008). Review: Ferraris, Goodbye Kant! [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):328-330.
  8. Nathan Bauer (2012). A Peculiar Intuition: Kant's Conceptualist Account of Perception. Inquiry 55 (3):215-237.
    Abstract Both parties in the active philosophical debate concerning the conceptual character of perception trace their roots back to Kant's account of sensible intuition in the Critique of Pure Reason. This striking fact can be attributed to Kant's tendency both to assert and to deny the involvement of our conceptual capacities in sensible intuition. He appears to waver between these two positions in different passages, and can thus seem thoroughly confused on this issue. But this is not, in fact, the (...)
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  9. Steven M. Bayne (2011). Marks, Images, and Rules. In Dennis Schulting & Jacco Verburgt (eds.), Kant's Idealism: New Interpretations of a Controversial Doctrine. Springer. 127-142.
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  10. Steven M. Bayne (2008). Abstract General Ideas and Kant's Schematism. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. vol. 2, 97-105.
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  11. Jocelyn Benoist (2004). « Le mythe du donné » et les avatars du kantisme analytique. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 4 (4):511-529.
  12. Robert J. Benton (1980). Kant's Categories of Practical Reason as Such. Kant-Studien 71 (1-4):181-201.
  13. Henny Blomme (2014). L'être de l'ombre. In Philosophie nach Kant. Neue Wege zum Verständnis von Kant's Transzendental- und Moralphilosophie. 107-126.
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  14. William F. Bristow (2001). Review: Keller, Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 110 (2):272-275.
  15. Stefanie Buchenau (2011). Notions directrices et architectonique de la métaphysique. La critique kantienne de Wolff en 1763. Astérion 9.
    Cet article cherche à reconstituer la thèse de Christian Wolff sur l’évidence (Deutlichkeit) des principes métaphysiques, dans un article de 1729 sur les « Notions directrices et le véritable usage de la première science », qui offre une référence centrale (et méconnue aujourd’hui) aux répondants du concours de 1762-1763, dont Kant. Wolff affirme en effet que la métaphysique est susceptible d’une certitude égale voire supérieure à celle des mathématiques et qu’elle diffuse cette certitude à travers toutes les autres disciplines ; (...)
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  16. Tyler Burge (2003). Logic and Analyticity. Grazer Philosophische Studien 66 (1):199-249.
    The view that logic is true independently of a subject matter is criticized—enlarging on Quine's criticisms and adding further ones. It is then argued apriori that full reflective understanding of logic and deductive reasoning requires substantial commitment to mathematical entities. It is emphasized that the objectively apriori connections between deductive reasoning and commitment to mathematics need not be accepted by or even comprehensible to a given deductive reasoner. The relevant connections emerged only slowly in the history of logic. But they (...)
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  17. Meir Buzaglo (2002). The Logic of Concept Expansion. Cambridge University Press.
    The operation of developing a concept is a common procedure in mathematics and in natural science, but has traditionally seemed much less possible to philosophers and, especially, logicians. Meir Buzaglo's innovative study proposes a way of expanding logic to include the stretching of concepts, while modifying the principles which block this possibility. He offers stimulating discussions of the idea of conceptual expansion as a normative process, and of the relation of conceptual expansion to truth, meaning, reference, ontology and paradox, and (...)
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  18. Mario Caimi (2005). Gedanken ohne Inhalt sind leer. Kant-Studien 96 (2):135-146.
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  19. John J. Callanan (2011). Normativity and the Acquisition of the Categories. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 63:1-26.
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  20. Kristian Camilleri (2005). Heisenberg and the Transformation of Kantian Philosophy. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):271 – 287.
    In this paper, I argue that Heisenberg's mature philosophy of quantum mechanics must be understood in the context of his epistemological project to reinterpret and redefine Kant's notion of the a priori. After discussions with Weizsäcker and Hermann in Leipzig in the 1930s, Heisenberg attempted to ground his interpretation of quantum mechanics on what might be termed a 'practical' transformation of Kantian philosophy. Taking as his starting point, Bohr's doctrine of the indispensability of classical concepts, Heisenberg argued that concepts such (...)
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  21. Andrew Carpenter (1995). Kant's (Problematic) Account of Empirical Concepts. In Robinson Hoke (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighth Inernational Kant Congress: Memphis, 1995. Marquette University Press. vol. 2, 227-234.
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  22. Patricio Lepe Carrión (2009). La construcción esquemática en Kant, y la imaginación como facultad determinante a priori de la sensibilidad. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 61:3.
  23. Quassim Cassam (2003). A Priori Concepts. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Clarendon Press.
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  24. Ernst Cassirer (1928). Zur Theorie des Begriffs. Kant-Studien 33 (1-2):129-136.
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  25. Predrag Cicovacki (1997). Anamorphosis: Kant and Knowledge and Ignorance. University Press of America.
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  26. Predrag Cicovacki (1991). An Aporia of A Priori Knowledge. On Carl's and Beck's Interpretation of Kant's Letter to Markus Herz. Kant-Studien 82 (3):349-360.
  27. Luciano Codato (2002). Dedução dos Conhecimentos puros a priori (Reflexão 5923), de Kant. Cadernos de Filosofia Alemã 8:119-127.
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  28. Alberto Coffa (1982). Kant, Bolzano, and the Emergence of Logicism. Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):679-689.
  29. Nathan Colaner (2007). Re-Thinking the Conflict Concerning the Argument Structure of the 'Analytic of Concepts' in Kant's First Critique. Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):147-154.
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  30. Kevin Connolly (2014). Which Kantian Conceptualism (or Nonconceptualism)? Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):316-337.
    A recent debate in Kant scholarship concerns the role of concepts in Kant's theory of perception. Roughly, proponents of a conceptualist interpretation argue that for Kant, the possession of concepts is a prior condition for perception, while nonconceptualist interpreters deny this. The debate has two parts. One part concerns whether possessing empirical concepts is a prior condition for having empirical intuitions. A second part concerns whether Kant allows empirical intuitions without a priori concepts. Outside of Kant interpretation, the contemporary debate (...)
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  31. Antonopoulos Constantin (2011). Passive Knowledge: How to Make Sense of Kant's A Priori - Or How Not to Be “Too Busily Subsuming”. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):39.
    Subjectivists, taking the “collapse” of the observation-interpretation contrast much too seriously, are led to imagine that even perceptual knowledge is active. And therefore subject dependent. Turning the tables on this popular trend, I argue that even conceptual knowledge is passive. Kant’s epistemology is conceptual. But if also active, then incoherent. If synthetic a priori truths are to follow upon our mental activity, they were neither true nor, far less, a priori before that activity. “A priori” and “active” are contradictory attributes (...)
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  32. Michael E. Cuffaro (2012). Kant and Frege on Existence and the Ontological Argument. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):337-354.
    I argue that Kant's and Frege's refutations of the ontological argument are more similar than has generally been acknowledged. As I clarify, for both Kant and Frege, to say that something exists is to assert of a concept that it is instantiated. With such an assertion one expresses that there is a particular relation between the instantiating object and a rational subject - a particular mode of presentation for the object in question. By its very nature such a relation cannot (...)
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  33. Karin de Boer (2010). Pure Reason's Enlightenment: Transcendental Reflection in Kant's First Critique. Kant Yearbook 2:53-73.
    In this article I aim to clarify the nature of Kant’s transformation of rationalist metaphysics into a science by focusing on his conception of transcendental reflection. The aim of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, it is argued, consists primarily in liberating the productive strand of former general metaphysics – its reflection on the a priori elements of all knowledge – from the uncritical application of these elements to all things (within general metaphysics itself) and to things that can only be (...)
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  34. Willem R. de Jong (2010). The Analytic-Synthetic Distinction and the Classical Model of Science: Kant, Bolzano and Frege. Synthese 174 (2):237-261.
    This paper concentrates on some aspects of the history of the analytic-synthetic distinction from Kant to Bolzano and Frege. This history evinces considerable continuity but also some important discontinuities. The analytic-synthetic distinction has to be seen in the first place in relation to a science, i.e. an ordered system of cognition. Looking especially to the place and role of logic it will be argued that Kant, Bolzano and Frege each developed the analytic-synthetic distinction within the same conception of scientific rationality, (...)
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  35. Willem R. de Jong (1995). Kant's Analytic Judgments and the Traditional Theory of Concepts. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (4):613-641.
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  36. Georges Dicker (2004). Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Analytical Introduction. OUP USA.
    The Critique of Pure Reason is Kant's acknowledged masterpiece, in which he tackles the question of how we can possibly have knowledge that does not rest on experience (a priori knowledge). The first half of the Critique advances a constructive theory of human cognition and defends the possibility of human knowledge against the skeptical empiricism of Hume. These sections of the Critique are difficult for beginners and for advanced students alike. While there exist many scholarly works discussing the Critique on (...)
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  37. Katherine Dunlop (2012). Kant and Strawson on the Content of Geometrical Concepts. Noûs 46 (1):86-126.
    This paper considers Kant's understanding of conceptual representation in light of his view of geometry.
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  38. Theodor Ebert (2009). Michael Wolff über Syllogismen bei Aristoteles und Vernunftschlüsse bei Kant. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):357 - 372.
  39. Fiona Ellis (2005). Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. Routledge.
    This book traces a deep misunderstanding about the relation of concepts and reality in the history of philosophy. It exposes the influence of the mistake in the thought of Locke, Berkeley, Kant, Nietzche and Bradley, and suggests that the solution can be found in Hegelian thought. Ellis argues that the treatment proposed exemplifies Hegel's dialectical method. This is an important contribution to this area of philosophy.
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  40. Stephen Engstrom (2006). Understanding and Sensibility. Inquiry 49 (1):2 – 25.
    Kant holds that the human cognitive power is divided into two "stems", understanding and sensibility. This doctrine has seemed objectionably dualistic to many critics, who see these stems as distinct parts, each able on its own to produce representations, which must somehow interact, determining or constraining one another, in order to secure the fit, requisite for cognition, between concept and intuition. This reading cannot be squared, however, with what Kant actually says about theoretical cognition and the way understanding and sensibility (...)
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  41. Alfredo Ferrarin (1995). Construction and Mathematical Schematism: Kant on the Exhibition of a Concept in Intuition. Kant-Studien 86 (2):131-174.
  42. Renato Duarte Fonseca (2012). Predicação E Extensão Conceitual Em Kant: Problemas. Manuscrito 35 (1):115-157.
    O artigo examina a noção de extensão conceitual em Kant, a fim de determinar uma visão de predicação que possa integrar, de forma coerente, compromissos teóricos básicos da lógica geral como ele a concebia e os fundamentos de sua lógica transcendental. Após um breve panorama das diversas caracterizações da noção no corpus kantiano, distingo três modelos interpretativos acerca da mesma na literatura. Tais modelos são criticados e suas perspectivas de integrar os compromissos de Kant de modo inteiramente satisfatório são rejeitadas. (...)
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  43. Michael Friedman (1990). Kant on Concepts and Intuitions in the Mathematical Sciences. Synthese 84 (2):213 - 257.
  44. Christopher Gauker (2011). Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas. Oxford University Press.
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to show (...)
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  45. Ido Geiger (2003). Is the Assumption of a Systematic Whole of Empirical Concepts a Necessary Condition of Knowledge? Kant-Studien 94 (3):273-298.
  46. Hannah Ginsborg (2006). Kant and the Problem of Experience. Philosophical Topics 34 (1/2):59-106.
    As most of its readers are aware, the Critique of Pure Reason is primarily concerned not with empirical, but with a priori knowledge. For the most part, the Kant of the first Critique tends to assume that experience, and the knowledge that is based on it, is unproblematic. The problem with which he is concerned is that of how we can be capable of substantive knowledge independently of experience. At the same time, however, the notion of experience plays a crucial (...)
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  47. Hannah Ginsborg (2006). Thinking the Particular as Contained Under the Universal. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In a well-known passage from the Introduction to Kant’s Critique of Judgment, Kant defines the power or faculty of judgment [Urteilskraft] as "the capacity to think the particular as contained under the universal" (Introduction IV, 5:179).1 He then distinguishes two ways in which this faculty can be exercised, namely as determining or as reflecting. These two ways are defined as follows: "If the universal (the rule, the principle, the law) is given, then judgment, which subsumes the particular under it... is (...)
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  48. Hans-Johann Glock (1997). Kant and Wittgenstein: Philosophy, Necessity and Representation. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (2):285 – 305.
    Several authors have detected profound analogies between Kant and Wittgenstein. Their claims have been contradicted by scholars, such being the agreed penalty for attributions to authorities. Many of the alleged similarities have either been left unsubstantiated at a detailed exegetical level, or have been confined to highly general points. At the same time, the 'scholarly' backlash has tended to ignore the importance of some of these general points, or has focused on very specific issues or purely terminological matters. To advance (...)
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  49. M. Glouberman (2009). Conceptuality: An Essay in Retrieval. Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):383-408.
  50. Karen Gloy (1984). Die Kantische Differenz von Begriff und Anschauung und ihre Begründung. Kant-Studien 75 (1-4):1-37.
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