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  1. Brenda Almond (2010). The Ethics of Care and Empathy – Michael Slote. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):211-213.
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  2. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
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  3. Chrisoula Andreou (2005). Review of Phillipa Foot's Natural Goodness (Oxford: Clarendon Press 2001). [REVIEW] Utilitas 17 (3):359-361.
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  4. Chrisoula Andreou (2005). Phillipa Foot, Natural Goodness (Oxford: Clarendon Press 2001), Pp. 125. Utilitas 17 (3):359-361.
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  5. Aristotle (2009). The Nicomachean Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    'Happiness, then, is the best, noblest, and most pleasant thing in the world.' -/- In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle's guiding question is: what is the best thing for a human being? His answer is happiness, but he means, not something we feel, but rather a specially good kind of life. Happiness is made up of activities in which we use the best human capacities, both ones that contribute to our flourishing as members of a community, and ones that allow us (...)
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  6. Nafsika Athanassoulis, Virtue Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7. Brian Barry (2010). David Hume as a Social Theorist. Utilitas 22 (4):369-392.
    This article examines Russell Hardin's interpretation of Hume's argument that great social order depends on coordination convention. The main argument shows that despite an apparent move in that direction Hume's main argument is that justice and the other convention-based virtues rest on a cooperative convention which solves a prisoner's dilemma problem and that states are required when a society exceeds some small size because only states can solve the large number prisoner's dilemma problems that constitute the . In this Hume's (...)
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  8. Sandrine Berges (2013). The Impossibility of Perfection. Aristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics. By Michael Slote. (New York: Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. Ix + 167. Price £30.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):624-626.
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  9. Philip Cafaro (2010). Environmental Virtue Ethics Special Issue: Introduction. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):3-7.
  10. Philip Cafaro (2001). Dirty Virtues: Emergence of Ecological Virtue Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (2):211-214.
  11. Philip Cafaro & Ronald L. Sandler (eds.) (2004). Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  12. Cheshire Calhoun (2008). Symposium on Lisa Tessman's Burdened Virtues. Hypatia 23 (3-4):182.
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  13. Shaoming Chen (2008). Endurance and Non-Endurance: From the Perspective of Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):335-351.
    By analysing the two relevant psychological phenomena of “endurance” and “non-endurance,” this essay aims to reveal the ethical implications of a Confucian approach, namely regarding non-endurance as an impulse of primary virtue. Based on this case study, the author then explores the significance of moral cultivation or psychological training in establishing moral personality and the complexities of such a process. Meanwhile, “love” in Confucian ethics means sympathy for the inferior rather than affection for the revered. Hopefully, this study may deepen (...)
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  14. Christopher Miles Coope (2006). Modern Virtue Ethics. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  15. Roger Crisp & Michael A. Slote (eds.) (1997). Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together much of the most influential work undertaken in the field of virtue ethics over the last four decades. The ethics of virtue predominated in the ancient world, and recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in virtue ethics as a rival to Kantian and utilitarian approaches to morality. Divided into four sections, the collection includes articles critical of other traditions; early attempts to offer a positive vision of virtue ethics; some later criticisms of the (...)
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  16. Christine Daigle (2006). Nietzsche: Virtue Ethics. . . Virtue Politics? Journal of Nietzsche Studies 32 (1):1-21.
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  17. Stephen L. Darwall (ed.) (2003). Virtue Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    "Virtue Ethics" is a major approach to normative ethical theory that takes the consideration of character as fundamental to ethical reflection.
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  18. R. Das (2003). Virtue Ethics and Right Action. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):324 – 339.
    In this paper I evaluate some recent virtue-ethical accounts of right action [Hursthouse 1999; Slote 2001; Swanton 2001]. I argue that all are vulnerable to what I call the insularity objection : evaluating action requires attention to worldly consequences external to the agent, whereas virtue ethics is primarily concerned with evaluating an agent's inner states. More specifically, I argue that insofar as these accounts are successful in meeting the insularity objection they invite the circularity objection : they end up relying (...)
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  19. S. F. (2003). Christine Swanton Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003). Pp. XI+312. £35.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 119 9253888. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (4):502-503.
  20. Nicolito Gianan (2011). Delving Into the Ethical Dimension Of. Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology 8 (1):63-82.
  21. Robert Guay (2006). Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31 (1):75-77.
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  22. John Hacker-Wright (2010). Virtue Ethics Without Right Action: Anscombe, Foot, and Contemporary Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (2):209-224.
  23. Pamela M. Hall (2008). Virtue Ethics Old and New (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 332-332.
  24. Pamela M. Hall (2008). ≪span Xmlns:Xlink="Http://Www.W3.Org/1999/Xlink" Xmlns:Mml="Http://Www.W3.Org/1998/Math/MathML" Xmlns:M="Http://Www.W3.Org/1998/Math/MathML" Style="Font-Style:Italic;"≫Virtue Ethics Old and New≪/Span≫ (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):332-332.
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  25. Rosalind Hursthouse (1999/2001). On Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Virtue ethics is perhaps the most important development within late twentieth-century moral philosophy. Rosalind Hursthouse, who has made notable contributions to this development, here presents a full exposition and defense of her neo-Aristotelian version of virtue ethics. She shows how virtue ethics can provide guidance for action, illuminate moral dilemmas, and bring out the moral significance of the emotions.
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  26. John Kultgen (1998). Slote's Free-Standing Virtue Ethics and its Props. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):103-110.
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  27. John Kultgen (1998). The Vicissitudes of Common-Sense Virtue Ethics, Part I: From Aristotle to Slote. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):325-341.
  28. John Kultgen (1998). The Vicissitudes of Common-Sense Virtue Ethics, Part II: The Heuristic Use of Common Sense. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):465-478.
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  29. Robert B. Louden (1994). On Pincoffs' Conception of Ethics. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:9-22.
    This essay focuses on Edmund Pincoffs’ arguments in defense of virtue ehtics and against ethical theory. His advocacy of virtue ethics hinges on the claims that: 1) the virtues are central to ancient ethics, modern ethics representing an unjustifiable change in orientation; 2) modern ethics is overly legalistic, construing morality merely as a set of universalistic action-guiding rules; 3) modern ethics is objectionably reductivistic, reducing morality to conscientiousness. Pincoffs’ opposition to ethical theory is based on the claims that: 4) ethical (...)
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  30. Elinor Mason (2005). Christine Swanton, Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2003), Pp. XI + 312. Utilitas 17 (2):231-233.
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  31. Elinor Mason (2003). Rosalind Hursthouse, On Virtue Ethics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999, Pp. X + 275. Utilitas 15 (02):250-.
  32. Michelle Mason (2005). Christine Swanton, Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View. [REVIEW] Ethics 115 (2):430-434.
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  33. Bernard Mayo (2009). Virtue Ethics. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  34. Thaddeus Metz (2013). The Virtues of African Ethics. In Stan van Hooft (ed.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing. 276-84.
    Since its inception as a professional field in the 1960s or so, African ethics has been neglected not only by virtue ethicists, but also by international scholars in moral philosophy generally. This is unfortunate, since sub-Saharan normative perspectives are characteristically virtue-centred, and, furthermore, are both different from traditional Western forms and just as worth taking seriously as they are. In my contribution, I spell out the two major respects in which virtue is a salient theme in African ethics, and critically (...)
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  35. William Simkulet (2013). Essays on the History of Ethics by Michael Slote (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):500-501.
    In this book Michael Slote discusses the history of ethics from a sentimentalist perspective. It can be read in two ways: first, as a tribute to great thinkers whose contributions have helped shape contemporary ethics, and second, as a defense of a sentimentalist virtue theory. This review centers on the two chapters most relevant to sentimentalist virtue theory: chapter 1, in which Slote defines and defends elevationism, and chapter 5, in which he offers a defense of sentimentalism. The first essay (...)
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  36. D. A. Lloyd Thomas (1995). Thomas Hurka, Perfectionism, New York, Oxford University Press, 1993, Pp. Xi + 222. Utilitas 7 (02):327-.
  37. John R. Williams (2012). Virtue as Social Intelligence: An Empirically Grounded Theory. By Nancy E. Snow. Pp. X, 134, New York, Routledge, 2010, $19.99. The Lost Art of Happiness. By Arthur Dobrin. Pp. 239, Amherst, NY, Prometheus Books, 2011, $17.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):699-700.
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Agent-Based Virtue Ethics
  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (2006). A Theory of Virtue: Excellence in Being for the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The distinguished philosopher Robert M. Adams presents a major work on virtue, which is once again a central topic in ethical thought. A Theory of Virtue is a systematic, comprehensive framework for thinking about the moral evaluation of character. Many recent attempts to stake out a place in moral philosophy for this concern define virtue in terms of its benefits for the virtuous person or for human society more generally. In Part One of this book Adams presents and defends a (...)
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  2. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Socio-Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
  3. Mark Alfano (2013). Virtues, Intelligences, and Situations. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16:671-673.
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  4. Mark Alfano & Abrol Fairweather, Situationism and Virtue Theory. Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
    Virtues are dispositions to see, think, desire, deliberate, or act well, with different philosophers emphasizing different permutations of these activities. Virtue has been an object of philosophical concern for thousands of years whereas situationism—the psychological theory according to which a great deal of human perception, thought, motivation, deliberation, and behavior are explained not by character or personality dispositions but by seemingly trivial and normatively irrelevant situational influences—was a development of the 20th century. Some philosophers, especially John Doris and Gilbert Harman (...)
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  5. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2005). Common-Sense Virtue Ethics and Moral Luck. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (3):265 - 276.
    Moral luck poses a problem for out conception of responsibility because it highlights a tension between morality and lack of control. Michael Slote’s common-sense virtue ethics claims to avoid this problem. However there are a number of objections to this claim. Firstly, it is not clear that Slote fully appreciates the problem posed by moral luck. Secondly, Slote’s move from the moral to the ethical is problematic. Thirdly it is not clear why we should want to abandon judgements of moral (...)
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  6. Michelle Ciurria (2012). A New Mixed View of Virtue Ethics, Based on Daniel Doviak's New Virtue Calculus. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):259-269.
    In A New Form of Agent-Based Virtue Ethics , Daniel Doviak develops a novel agent-based theory of right action that treats the rightness (or deontic status) of an action as a matter of the action’s net intrinsic virtue value (net-IVV)—that is, its balance of virtue over vice. This view is designed to accommodate three basic tenets of commonsense morality: (i) the maxim that “ought” implies “can,” (ii) the idea that a person can do the right thing for the wrong reason, (...)
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  7. David Copp & David Sobel (2004). Morality and Virtue: An Assessment of Some Recent Work in Virtue Ethics. Ethics 114 (3):514-554.
    This essay focuses on three recent books on morality and virtue, Michael Slote's 'Morals from Motives', Rosalind Hursthouse's 'On Virtue Ethics', and Philippa Foot's 'Natural Goodness'. Slote proposes an "agent-based" ethical theory according to which the ethical status of acts is derivative from assessments of virtue. Following Foot's lead, Hursthouse aims to vindicate an ethical naturalism that explains human goodness on the basis of views about human nature. Both Hursthouse and Slote take virtue to be morally basic in a way (...)
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  8. Daniel Doviak (2011). A New Form of Agent-Based Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (3):259-272.
    In Morals From Motives, Michael Slote defends an agent-based theory of right action according to which right acts are those that express virtuous motives like benevolence or care. Critics have claimed that Slote’s view— and agent-based views more generally— cannot account for several basic tenets of commonsense morality. In particular, the critics maintain that agent-based theories: (i) violate the deontic axiom that ought implies can , (ii) cannot allow for a person’s doing the right thing for the wrong reason, and (...)
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  9. Scott Gelfand (2000). Hypothetical Agent-Based Virtue Ethics. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):85-94.
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  10. Daniel Jacobson (2002). An Unsolved Problem for Slote's Agent-Based Virtue Ethics. Philosophical Studies 111 (1):53 - 67.
    According to Slote's ``agent-based'' virtue ethics, the rightness orwrongness of an act is determined by the motive it expresses. Thistheory has a problem with cases where an agent can do her duty onlyby expressing some vicious motive and thereby acting wrongly. In sucha situation, an agent can only act wrongly; hence, the theory seemsincompatible with the maxim that `ought' implies `can'. I argue thatSlote's attempt to circumvent this problem by appealing to compatibilism is inadequate. In a wide range of psychologically (...)
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  11. Craig Paterson (2000). Renewing the Moral Life: Some Recent Work in Virtue Theory. New Blackfriars 81 (952):238-44.
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  12. Liezl van Zyl (2011). Rightness and Goodness in Agent-Based Virtue Ethics. Journal of Philosophical Research 36:103-114.
    In Morals from Motives (2001) Michael Slote puts forward an agent-based virtue ethics that purports to derive an account of deontic terms from aretaic evaluations of motives or character traits. In this view, an action is right if and only if it proceeds from a good or virtuous motive or at least does not come from a bad motive, and wrong if it comes from a bad motive. I argue that Slote does not provide an account of right action at (...)
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  13. Liezl van Zyl (2009). Agent-Based Virtue Ethics and the Problem of Action Guidance. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (1):50-69.
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