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E. J. Lowe [300]E. Jonathan Lowe [11]
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Profile: E. J. Lowe (Durham University)
  1. Tuomas E. Tahko & E. J. Lowe, Ontological Dependence. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Ontological dependence is a relation—or, more accurately, a family of relations—between entities or beings. For there are various ways in which one being may be said to depend upon one or more other beings, in a sense of “depend” that is distinctly metaphysical in character and that may be contrasted, thus, with various causal senses of this word. More specifically, a being may be said to depend, in such a sense, upon one or more other beings for its existence or (...)
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  2. Peter Van Inwagen & E. J. Lowe (1996). Why Is There Anything at All? Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 70:95 - 120.
  3. E. J. Lowe (2005). The Four-Category Ontology: A Metaphysical Foundation for Natural Science. Oxford University Press.
    E. J. Lowe, a prominent figure in contemporary metaphysics, sets out and defends his theory of what there is. His four-category ontology is a metaphysical system which recognizes four fundamental categories of beings: substantial and non-substantial particulars and substantial and non-substantial universals. Lowe argues that this system has an explanatory power which is unrivaled by more parsimonious theories and that this counts decisively in its favor. He shows that it provides a powerful explanatory framework for a unified account of causation, (...)
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  4. E. J. Lowe (1998). The Possibility of Metaphysics: Substance, Identity, and Time. Oxford University Press.
    Lowe argues in this fascinating new study that metaphysics should be restored to centrality in philosophy, as the most fundamental form of inquiry, whose findings underpin those of all other disciplines. He portrays metaphysics as charting the possibilities of existence, by identifying the categories of being and the relations between them. He then sets out his own metaphysical system, with which he seeks to answer many of the most vexed questions in philosophy.
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  5.  69
    E. J. Lowe (2008). Personal Agency: The Metaphysics of Mind and Action. Oxford University Press.
    This theory accords to volitions the status of basic mental actions, maintaining that these are spontaneous exercises of the will--a "two-way" power which ...
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  6. E. J. Lowe (2002). A Survey of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    A systematic overview of modern metaphysics, A Survey of Metaphysics covers all of the most important topics in the field. It adopts the fairly traditional conception of metaphysics as a subject that deals with the deepest questions that can be raised concerning the fundamental structure of reality as a whole. The book is divided into six main sections that address the following themes: identity and change, necessity and essence, causation, agency and events, space and time, and universals and particulars. It (...)
     
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  7.  80
    E. J. Lowe (2009). More Kinds of Being: A Further Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Taking into account significant developments in the metaphysical thinking of E. J. Lowe over the past 20 years, More Kinds of Being:A Further Study of ...
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  8. E. J. Lowe (2011). The Rationality of Metaphysics. Synthese 178 (1):99-109.
    In this paper, it is argued that metaphysics, conceived as an inquiry into the ultimate nature of mind-independent reality, is a rationally indispensable intellectual discipline, with the a priori science of formal ontology at its heart. It is maintained that formal ontology, properly understood, is not a mere exercise in conceptual analysis, because its primary objective is a normative one, being nothing less than the attempt to grasp adequately the essences of things, both actual and possible, with a view to (...)
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  9. E. J. Lowe (2006). Non-Cartesian Substance Dualism and the Problem of Mental Causation. Erkenntnis 65 (1):5-23.
    Non-Cartesian substance dualism maintains that persons or selves are distinct from their organic physical bodies and any parts of those bodies. It regards persons as ‘substances’ in their own right, but does not maintain that persons are necessarily separable from their bodies, in the sense of being capable of disembodied existence. In this paper, it is urged that NCSD is better equipped than either Cartesian dualism or standard forms of physicalism to explain the possibility of mental causation. A model of (...)
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  10. E. J. Lowe (2000). Causal Closure Principles and Emergentism. Philosophy 75 (294):571-586.
    Causal closure arguments against interactionist dualism are currently popular amongst physicalists. Such an argument appeals to some principles of the causal closure of the physical, together with certain other premises, to conclude that at least some mental events are identical with physical events. However, it is crucial to the success of any such argument that the physical causal closure principle to which it appeals is neither too strong nor too weak by certain standards. In this paper, it is argued that (...)
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  11.  91
    E. J. Lowe (1988). Reviews : S. G. Shanker (Ed.), Philosophy in Britain Today Beckenham: Croom Helm, 1986; £18.95; 315 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 1 (1):132-134.
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  12. E. J. Lowe (2012). What is the Source of Our Knowledge of Modal Truths? Mind 121 (484):919-950.
    There is currently intense interest in the question of the source of our presumed knowledge of truths concerning what is, or is not, metaphysically possible or necessary. Some philosophers locate this source in our capacities to conceive or imagine various actual or non-actual states of affairs, but this approach is open to certain familiar and seemingly powerful objections. A different and ostensibly more promising approach has been developed by Timothy Williamson, according to which our capacity for modal knowledge is just (...)
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  13.  11
    E. J. Lowe & Stephen P. Stich (1992). The Fragmentation of Reason: Preface to a Pragmatic Theory of Cognitive Evaluation. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (166):98.
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  14. E. J. Lowe (1989). Kinds of Being: A Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms. Blackwell.
     
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  15. E. J. Lowe (1987). The Indexical Fallacy in Mctaggart's Proof of the Unreality of Time. Mind 96 (381):62-70.
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  16. E. J. Lowe (1996). Subjects of Experience. Cambridge University Press.
    In this innovative study of the relationship between persons and their bodies, E. J. Lowe demonstrates the inadequacy of physicalism, even in its mildest, non-reductionist guises, as a basis for a scientifically and philosophically acceptable account of human beings as subjects of experience, thought and action. He defends a substantival theory of the self as an enduring and irreducible entity - a theory which is unashamedly committed to a distinctly non-Cartesian dualism of self and body. Taking up the physicalist challenge (...)
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  17. E. J. Lowe (1995). The Truth About Counterfactuals. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):41-59.
  18. E. J. Lowe (2002). Properties, Modes, and Universals. Modern Schoolman 79 (2-3):137-150.
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  19. E. J. Lowe (2007). A Problem for a Posteriori Essentialism Concerning Natural Kinds. Analysis 67 (296):286–292.
  20. E. J. Lowe (1987). Lewis on Perdurance Versus Endurance. Analysis 47 (3):152 - 154.
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  21. E. J. Lowe (2008). Two Notions of Being: Entity and Essence. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (62):23-48.
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  22. E. J. Lowe (1989). What is a Criterion of Identity? Philosophical Quarterly 39 (154):1-21.
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  23. E. J. Lowe (1995). The Metaphysics of Abstract Objects. Journal of Philosophy 92 (10):509-524.
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  24.  88
    E. J. Lowe & A. Rami (2009). Truth and Truth-Making. Acumen.
    Truth depends in some sense on reality. But it is a rather delicate matter to spell this intuition out in a plausible and precise way. According to the theory of truth-making this intuition implies that either every truth or at least every truth of a certain class of truths has a so-called truth-maker, an entity whose existence accounts for truth. This book aims to provide several ways of assessing the correctness of this controversial claim. The book presents a detailed introduction (...)
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  25. E. J. Lowe (2002). Properties, Modes, and Universals. Modern Schoolman 79 (2-3):137-150.
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  26. E. J. Lowe (1988). The Problems of Intrinsic Change: Rejoinder to Lewis. Analysis 48 (2):72-77.
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  27. E. J. Lowe (2005). Vagueness and Endurance. Analysis 65 (286):104–112.
  28. E. J. Lowe (2003). Individuation. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press
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  29. E. J. Lowe (2007). Sortals and the Individuation of Objects. Mind and Language 22 (5):514–533.
    It has long been debated whether objects are ‘sortally’ individuated. This paper begins by clarifying some of the key terms in play—in particular, ‘sortal’, ‘individuation’, and ‘object’. The term ‘individuation’ is taken to have both a cognitive and a metaphysical sense, in the former denoting the singling out of an object in thought and in the latter a determination relation between entities. ‘Sortalism’ is defined as the doctrine that only as falling under some specific sortal concept can an object be (...)
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  30. E. J. Lowe (2002). Material Coincidence and the Cinematographic Fallacy: A Response to Olson. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (208):369-372.
    Eric T. Olson has argued that those who hold that two material objects can exactly coincide at a moment of time, with one of these objects constituting the other, face an insuperable difficulty in accounting for the alleged differences between the objects, such as their being of different kinds and possessing different persistence-conditions. The differences, he suggests, are inexplicable, given that the objects in question are composed of the same particles related in precisely the same way. In response, I show (...)
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  31. E. J. Lowe (2012). Mumford and Anjum on Causal Necessitarianism and Antecedent Strengthening. Analysis 72 (4):731-735.
    Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum have recently attacked causal necessitarianism – the doctrine that causes necessitate their effects – on the grounds that causation does not survive what they describe as the test of antecedent strengthening. This article shows that there are credible conditional logics which do not sanction this test, thereby providing an escape route for proponents of causal necessitarianism from Mumford and Anjum's argument.
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  32.  99
    E. J. Lowe (2013). Ontological Vagueness, Existence Monism and Metaphysical Realism. Metaphysica 14 (2):265-274.
    Recently, Terry Horgan and Matjaž Potrč have defended the thesis of ‘existence monism’, according to which the whole cosmos is the only concrete object. Their arguments appeal largely to considerations concerning vagueness. Crucially, they claim that ontological vagueness is impossible, and one key assumption in their defence of this claim is that vagueness always involves ‘sorites-susceptibility’. I aim to challenge both the claim and this assumption. As a consequence, I seek to undermine their defence of existence monism and support a (...)
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  33. Storrs McCall & E. J. Lowe (2003). 3d/4d Equivalence, the Twins Paradox and Absolute Time. Analysis 63 (278):114–123.
    The thesis of 3D/4D equivalence states that every three-dimensional description of the world is translatable without remainder into a four-dimensional description, and vice versa. In representing an object in 3D or in 4D terms we are giving alternative descriptions of one and the same thing, and debates over whether the ontology of the physical world is "really" 3D or 4D are pointless. The twins paradox is shown to rest, in relativistic 4D geometry, on a reversed law of triangle inequality. But (...)
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  34.  48
    E. J. Lowe (2012). A Neo-Aristotelian Substance Ontology: Neither Relational nor Constituent. In Tuomas E. Tahko (ed.), Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press 229-248.
    Following the lead of Gustav Bergmann ( 1967 ), if not his precise terminology, ontologies are sometimes divided into those that are ‘relational’ and those that are ‘constituent’ (Wolterstorff 1970 ). Substance ontologies in the Aristotelian tradition are commonly thought of as being constituent ontologies, because they typically espouse the hylemorphic dualism of Aristotle ’s Metaphysics – a doctrine according to which an individual substance is always a combination of matter and form. But an alternative approach drawing more on the (...)
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  35.  95
    Storrs McCall & E. J. Lowe (2006). The 3d/4d Controversy: A Storm in a Teacup. Noûs 40 (3):570–578.
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  36. E. J. Lowe (2010). Real Essentialism – David S. Oderberg. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):648-652.
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  37. E. J. Lowe (2002). Metaphysical Nihilism and the Subtraction Argument. Analysis 62 (273):62–73.
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  38. E. J. Lowe (2000). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Jonathan Lowe offers a lucid and wide-ranging introduction to the philosophy of mind. Using a problem-centred approach designed to stimulate as well as instruct, he begins with a general examination of the mind-body problem and moves on to detailed examination of more specific philosophical issues concerning sensation, perception, thought and language, rationality, artificial intelligence, action, personal identity and self-knowledge. His discussion is notably broad in scope, and distinctive in giving equal attention to deep metaphysical questions concerning the (...)
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  39.  66
    E. J. Lowe (1980). Peacocke and Kraemer on Butler's Problem. Analysis 40 (3):113 - 118.
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  40. Storrs McCall & E. J. Lowe (2009). The Definition of Endurance. Analysis 69 (2):277-280.
    David Lewis, following in the tradition of Broad, Quine and Goodman, says that change in an object X consists in X's being temporally extended and having qualitatively different temporal parts. Analogously, change in a spatially extended object such as a road consists in its having different spatial parts . The alternative to this view is that ordinary objects undergo temporal change in virtue of having different intrinsic non-relational properties at different times. They endure, remaining the same object throughout change, whereas (...)
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  41. E. J. Lowe (2011). Locke on Real Essence and Water as a Natural Kind: A Qualified Defence. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):1-19.
    ‘Water is H2O’ is one of the most frequently cited sentences in analytic philosophy, thanks to the seminal work of Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam in the 1970s on the semantics of natural kind terms. Both of these philosophers owe an intellectual debt to the empiricist metaphysics of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, while disagreeing profoundly with Locke about the reality of natural kinds. Locke employs an intriguing example involving water to support his view that kinds (or ‘species’), such (...)
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  42.  97
    E. J. Lowe (1986). On a Supposed Temporal/Modal Parallel. Analysis 46 (4):195 - 197.
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  43. E. J. Lowe (1987). Reply to le Poidevin and Mellor. Mind 96 (384):539-542.
    In ‘Time, Change and the “Indexical Fallacy”’,1 Robin Le Poidevin and D. H. Mellor criticize an earlier paper of mine2 both for failing to rebut an argument of McTaggart's and for failing to explain why time is the dimension of change. I consider that their criticisms miss the mark on both scores, partly through misrepresentation of my views and partly through defective argumentation.
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  44. E. J. Lowe (2003). Recent Advances in Metaphysics. Facta Philosophica 5:3-24.
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  45. E. J. Lowe (2010). On the Individuation of Powers. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge
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  46.  82
    E. J. Lowe (1995). Coinciding Objects: In Defence of the 'Standard Account'. Analysis 55 (3):171 - 178.
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  47.  98
    E. J. Lowe (1994). Ontological Dependency. Philosophical Papers 23 (1):31-48.
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  48.  60
    E. J. Lowe (1987). Reply to Noonan. Analysis 47 (4):201 - 203.
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  49. E. J. Lowe (2008). New Directions in Metaphysics and Ontology. Axiomathes 18 (3):273-288.
    A personal view is presented of how metaphysics and ontology stand at the beginning of the twenty-first century, in the light of developments during the twentieth. It is argued that realist metaphysics, with serious ontology at its heart, has a promising future, provided that its adherents devote some time and effort to countering the influences of both its critics and its false friends.
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  50.  71
    E. J. Lowe (1994). Vague Identity and Quantum Indeterminacy. Analysis 54 (2):110 - 114.
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