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Nosology raises philosophical questions about what bases are and should be used for classifying diseases, often focusing on the use of biomedical (etiological/pathogenetic) versus symptomatic bases, and the nature of the ‘boundaries’ between conditions. Much of the existing literature focuses on mental disorder. Literature in applied ethics and related medical humanities examines how nosological systems have been shaped by social and historical factors; shape the practice of medicine at both clinical and policy levels; and raises a range of ethical issues such as access to treatment, labelling, and research practices.

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  1. added 2020-06-18
    2. Typologies of Disease: Nosologies Revisited.H. Tristram Engelhardt - 1985 - In Kenneth F. Schaffner (ed.), Logic of Discovery and Diagnosis in Medicine. University of California Press. pp. 56-71.
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  2. added 2020-06-16
    Philippe Huneman, Gérard Lambert and Marc Silberstein Classification, Disease and Evidence: New Essays in the Philosophy of Medicine: Dordrecht, Heidelberg, New York, London: Springer, 2015, Series: History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences, Vol. 7, 211 Pp, €83,29.Jonathan Sholl - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (3):339-341.
  3. added 2020-05-13
    Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy.Darian Meacham (ed.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
    This volume addresses some of the most prominent questions in contemporary bioethics and philosophy of medicine: ‘liberal’ eugenics, enhancement, the normal and the pathological, the classification of mental illness, the relation between genetics, disease and the political sphere, the experience of illness and disability, and the sense of the subject of bioethical inquiry itself. All of these issues are addressed from a “continental” perspective, drawing on a rich tradition of inquiry into these questions in the fields of phenomenology, philosophical hermeneutics, (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-13
    Syndrome Stabilization in Psychiatry: Pathological Gambling as a Case Study.Don Ross - unknown
    Murphy (2006) criticizes psychiatric nosology from the perspective of the philosophy of science, arguing that the model of pathology as encapsulated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders reflects a folk conception of the mental, and of malfunctioning, that is inadequately integrated with cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. The present paper supports this view through a case study of research on pathological gambling. It argues that recent modeling based on fMRI studies and behavioral genetics suggests a stipulative, non-seamless reduction (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-13
    Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders.Elizabeth H. Flanagan Roger K. Blashfield - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 249-269.
    Using methods from anthropology and cognitive psychology, this study investigated the relationship between clinicians’ folk taxonomies of mental disorder and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Expert and novice psychologists were given sixty-seven DSM-IV diagnoses, asked to discard unfamiliar diagnoses, put the remaining diagnoses into groups that had “similar treatments” using hierarchical (making more inclusive and less inclusive groups) and dimensional (placing groups in a two-dimensional space) methodologies, and give names to the groups in their taxonomies. Clinicians (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-13
    Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry.K. W. M. Fulford - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a series (...)
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  7. added 2020-05-11
    Saving the DSM-5? Descriptive Conceptions and Theoretical Concepts of Mental Disorders. MEDICINA & STORIA, 109-128.Elisabetta Lalumera - 2016 - Medicina E Storia (9-10):109-129.
    Abstract: At present, psychiatric disorders are characterized descriptively, as the standard within the scientific community for communication and, to a cer- tain extent, for diagnosis, is the DSM, now at its fifth edition. The main rea- sons for descriptivism are the aim of achieving reliability of diagnosis and improving communication in a situation of theoretical disagreement, and the Ignorance argument, which starts with acknowledgment of the relative fail- ure of the project of finding biomarkers for most mental disorders. Descrip- tivism (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-11
    Externalist Psychiatry.Will Davies - 2016 - Analysis 76 (3):290-296.
    Psychiatry widely assumes an internalist biomedical model of mental illness. I argue that many of psychiatry’s diagnostic categories involve an implicit commitment to constitutive externalism about mental illness. Some of these categories are socially externalist in nature.
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  9. added 2020-05-11
    Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds.Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - 2014 - In Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (eds.), Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds. MIT Press. pp. 1-10.
    In this volume, leading philosophers of psychiatry examine psychiatric classification systems, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, asking whether current systems are sufficient for effective diagnosis, treatment, and research. Doing so, they take up the question of whether mental disorders are natural kinds, grounded in something in the outside world. Psychiatric categories based on natural kinds should group phenomena in such a way that they are subject to the same type of causal explanations and respond similarly to (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-11
    Psychiatry's New Manual : Ethical and Conceptual Dimensions: Table 1.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):531-536.
    The introduction of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders in May 2013 is being hailed as the biggest event in psychiatry in the last 10 years. In this paper I examine three important issues that arise from the new manual: Expanding nosology: Psychiatry has again broadened its nosology to include human experiences not previously under its purview . Consequence-based ethical concerns about this expansion are addressed, along with conceptual concerns about a confusion of “construct validity” and “conceptual validity” (...)
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  11. added 2020-05-11
    Classifying Unknowns: The Idiopathic Problem.Thomas Beaney - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):126-130.
    The term, idiopathic, emerged as a key concept in the classification of disease in the 18th century and has become ingrained in our terminology in defining diseases and their aetiologies throughout all fields of medicine. Despite, or perhaps because of this, little has been written about the meaning or meanings of the word itself. Although most medical professionals will be able to offer a definition of idiopathic, different definitions of the word are in use and are often confused or used (...)
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  12. added 2020-05-11
    A Brief Historicity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Issues and Implications for the Future of Psychiatric Canon and Practice. [REVIEW]Shadia Kawa & James Giordano - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-9.
    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its fourth edition and considered the reference for the characterization and diagnosis of mental disorders, has undergone various developments since its inception in the mid-twentieth century. With the fifth edition of the DSM presently in field trials for release in 2013, there is renewed discussion and debate over the extent of its relative successes - and shortcomings - at iteratively incorporating scientific evidence on the often ambiguous nature (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-11
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:8-.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  14. added 2020-05-11
    Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations.Lisa Bortolotti - 2011 - Paradigmi (1):99-112.
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a certain (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-11
    On the Ontological Assumptions of the Medical Model of Psychiatry: Philosophical Considerations and Pragmatic Tasks. [REVIEW]Tejas Patil & James Giordano - 2010 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5:3.
    A common theme in the contemporary medical model of psychiatry is that pathophysiological processes are centrally involved in the explanation, evaluation, and treatment of mental illnesses. Implied in this perspective is that clinical descriptors of these pathophysiological processes are sufficient to distinguish underlying etiologies. Psychiatric classification requires differentiation between what counts as normality (i.e.- order), and what counts as abnormality (i.e.- disorder). The distinction(s) between normality and pathology entail assumptions that are often deeply presupposed, manifesting themselves in statements about what (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-11
    Symptoms as Latent Variables.Dennis J. McFarland & Loretta S. Malta - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):165 - 166.
    In the target article, Cramer et al. suggest that diagnostic classification is improved by modeling the relationship between manifest variables (i.e., symptoms) rather than modeling unobservable latent variables (i.e., diagnostic categories such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder). This commentary discusses whether symptoms represent manifest or latent variables and the implications of this distinction for diagnosis and treatment.
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  17. added 2020-05-11
    Notes on a Few Issues in the Philosophy of Psychiatry.A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh - 2009 - Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):128.
    _The first part called the Preamble tackles: (a) the issues of silence and speech, and life and disease; (b) whether we need to know some or all of the truth, and how are exact science and philosophical reason related; (c) the phenomenon of Why, How, and What; (d) how are mind and brain related; (e) what is robust eclecticism, empirical/scientific enquiry, replicability/refutability, and the role of diagnosis and medical model in psychiatry; (f) bioethics and the four principles of beneficence, non-malfeasance, (...)
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  18. added 2020-05-11
    Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry.Tim Thornton - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry is a concise introduction to the growing field of philosophy of psychiatry. Divided into three main aspects of psychiatric clinical judgement, values, meanings and facts, it examines the key debates about mental health care, and the philosophical ideas and tools needed to assess those debates, in six chapters. In addition to outlining the state of play, Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry presents a coherent and unified approach across the different debates, characterized by a rejection of reductionism and (...)
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  19. added 2020-05-11
    Human Brain Evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-Depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of Fear-Circuitry-Related Traits in Dsm-V and for Studying Resilience to Warzone-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.Dr H. Stefan Bracha - 2006 - Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 30:827-853.
    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in adult (...)
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  20. added 2020-05-11
    Psychiatry in the Scientific Image.Dominic Murphy - 2005 - MIT Press.
    In _ Psychiatry in the Scientific Image, _Dominic Murphy looks at psychiatry from the viewpoint of analytic philosophy of science, considering three issues: how we should conceive of, classify, and explain mental illness. If someone is said to have a mental illness, what about it is mental? What makes it an illness? How might we explain and classify it? A system of psychiatric classification settles these questions by distinguishing the mental illnesses and showing how they stand in relation to one (...)
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  21. added 2020-05-11
    The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion.Tim Thornton (ed.) - 2004 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive resource of original essays by leading thinkers exploring the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of the philosophy of psychiatry. The contributors aim to define this exciting field and to highlight the philosophical assumptions and issues that underlie psychiatric theory and practice, the category of mental disorder, and rationales for its social, clinical, and legal treatment.
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  22. added 2020-05-11
    The Gap Between Theory and Practice: An Exploration of the Boundaries Between Psychopathology and Normality.Estee Sharon - 1996 - Dissertation, Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
    This theoretical study highlights the silent yet salient impact of politics, culture, science, and power on the constitution of theories and on the definitions and classifications of psychopathology. The paradoxical notion suggested in this study is that the institution of psychotherapy in particular and the "scientific" field of psychology in general may construct and perpetuate the dysfunction, disease, disorder, and the very psychopathology that they attempt to heal or cure. ;The theoretical approach applied in this study represents an inter-disciplinary review (...)
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  23. added 2020-05-07
    A Perspective on Causation of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Considering its Nosology.Peter Denton White - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):991-996.
  24. added 2020-05-07
    In Search of Psychiatric Kinds: Natural Kinds and Natural Classification in Psychiatry.Nicholas Slothouber - unknown
    In recent years both philosophers and scientists have asked whether or not our current kinds of mental disorder—e.g., schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder—are natural kinds; and, moreover, whether or not the search for natural kinds of mental disorder is a realistic desideratum for psychiatry. In this dissertation I clarify the sense in which a kind can be said to be “natural” or “real” and argue that, despite a few notable exceptions, kinds of mental disorder cannot be considered natural kinds. Furthermore, I (...)
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  25. added 2020-05-07
    The Absent Body in Psychiatric Diagnosis, Treatment, and Research.Catherine Stinson - 2019 - Synthese 196 (6).
    Discussions of psychiatric nosology focus on a few popular examples of disorders, and on the validity of diagnostic criteria. Looking at Anorexia Nervosa, an example rarely mentioned in this literature, reveals a new problem: the DSM has a strict taxonomic structure, which assumes that disorders can only be located on one branch. This taxonomic assumption fails to fit the domain of psychopathology, resulting in obfuscation of cross-category connections. Poor outcomes for treatment of Anorexia may be due to it being pigeonholed (...)
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  26. added 2020-05-07
    Phenomenology and Dimensional Approaches to Psychiatric Research and Classification.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):65-75.
    Contemporary psychiatry finds itself in the midst of a crisis of classification. The developments begun in the 1980s—with the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders —successfully increased inter-rater reliability. However, these developments have done little to increase the predictive validity of our categories of disorder. A diagnosis based on DSM categories and criteria often fails to accurately anticipate course of illness or treatment response. In addition, there is little evidence that the DSM categories link up (...)
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  27. added 2020-05-07
    Universal Etiology, Multifactorial Diseases and the Constitutive Model of Disease Classification.Jonathan Fuller - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 67:8-15.
  28. added 2020-05-07
    Ontological Assumptions, a Biopsychosocial Approach, and Patient Participation: Moving Toward an Ethically Legitimate Science of Psychiatric Nosology.Porter Douglas - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):223-226.
    Important philosophical work has gone into debunking thoroughly entrenched positivist notions that objective science proceeds in a value neutral manner. Dr. Tamara Kayali Browne's article "A Role for Philosophers, Sociologists, and Bioethicists in Revising the DSM" admirably takes the next step. Given the evaluative elements that permeate, in this case, the science of nosology—how do we deal responsibly with those evaluative elements? She correctly, in my opinion, concludes that dealing with evaluative issues responsibly is tantamount to dealing with them ethically. (...)
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  29. added 2020-05-07
    Vagueness in Psychiatry.Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of ‘subthreshold disorders’ and of the ‘prodromal stages’ of diseases are notoriously contentious. -/- Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, ‘vague’. Although blurred boundaries between the normal and the pathological are a recurrent theme in (...)
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  30. added 2020-05-07
    Values and DSM-5: Looking at the Debate on Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome.Arthur Maciel Nunes Gonçalves, Clarissa de Rosalmeida Dantas & Claudio E. M. Banzato - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundAlthough values have increasingly received attention in psychiatric literature over the last three decades, their role has been only partially acknowledged in psychiatric classification endeavors. The review process of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders received harsh criticism, and was even considered secretive by some authors. Also, it lacked an official discussion of values at play. In this perspective paper we briefly discuss the interplay of some values in the scientific and non-scientific debate around (...)
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  31. added 2020-05-07
    A New Classification of Mental Illness Based on Brain Functions.G. Miraglia Biagio - 2014 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 7 (2):63-67.
    The classification of mental disorders based on their phenomenal picture is in crisis and we need a new revolutionary classification primarily based on brain functions: mental disorders shall be derived from dysfunctions of brain circuits performing specific mental functions. This sentence could be taken from a today’s paper discussing the crisis of the DSM-5 and the RDoC Project as a possible revolutionary model based on brain/cognitive dysfunctions. But this same sentence applies very well to the proposal of a new classification (...)
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  32. added 2020-05-07
    Psychiatric Taxonomy: At the Crossroads of Science and Ethics.Şerife Tekin - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):513-514.
    The scientific investigation of mental disorders is an invigorating area of inquiry for philosophers of mind and science who are interested in exploring the nature of typical and atypical cognition as well as the overarching scientific project of ‘carving nature at its joints’. It is also important for philosophers of medicine and bioethicists who are concerned with concepts of disease and with the development of effective and ethical treatments of mental disorders and the just distribution of mental health services. Philosophical (...)
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  33. added 2020-05-07
    A Note on the Dynamics of Psychiatric Classification.José Eduardo Porcher - 2014 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):27-47.
    The question of how psychiatric classifications are made up and to what they refer has attracted the attention of philosophers in recent years. In this paper, I review the claims of authors who discuss psychiatric classification in terms referring both to the philosophical tradition of natural kinds and to the sociological tradition of social constructionism — especially those of Ian Hacking and his critics. I examine both the ontological and the social aspects of what it means for something to be (...)
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  34. added 2020-05-07
    Stabilizing Autism: A Fleckian Account of the Rise of a Neurodevelopmental Spectrum Disorder.Berend Verhoeff - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46 (1):65-78.
    Using the conceptual tools of philosopher of science Ludwik Fleck, I argue that the reframing of autism as a neurodevelopmental spectrum disorder is constrained by two governing ‘styles of thought’ of contemporary psychiatry. The first is the historically conditioned ‘readiness for directed perception’ of, and thinking in terms of, ontologically distinct diseases. The clinical gaze of mental health professionals, the bureaucratic needs of health administration, the clinical and scientific utility of disease categories, and the practices of autism-oriented advocacy groups all (...)
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  35. added 2020-05-07
    Sauvages’ Paperwork: How Disease Classification Arose From Scholarly Note-Taking.J. Andrew Mendelsohn & Volker Hess - 2014 - Early Science and Medicine 19 (5):471-503.
  36. added 2020-05-07
    Fallgeschichte, Historia, Klassifikation: François Boissier de Sauvages Bei der Schreibarbeit.Volker Hess & J. Andrew Mendelsohn - 2013 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 21 (1):61-92.
    What was classification as it first took modern form in the eighteenth century, how did it work, and how did it relate to earlier describing and ordering? We offer new answers to these questions by considering an example less well known than that of botany or zoology, namely medicine, and by reconstructing practice on paper. The first and best-known disease classification is the “nosology” of the Montpellier physician François Boissier de Sauvages de Lacroix. Its several editions, we show, were less (...)
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  37. added 2020-05-07
    Classification, Disease, and Diagnosis.Annemarie Jutel - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):189-205.
    Classification shapes medicine and guides its practice. As clinicians classify symptoms and illnesses, they trigger a range of actions and consequences. The assignment of particular disease labels is linked to both therapeutic and social responses. However, the classifications of medicine, natural though they may seem, contain significant social content, and are arrived at via a number of cultural framing devices (Aronowitz 2008). This article will explore the social intent and construction of classification and their embodiment in medical diagnosis.Effective classification recognizes (...)
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  38. added 2020-05-07
    In Quest of 'Good' Medical Classification Systems.Lara K. Kutschenko - 2011 - Medicine Studies 3 (1):53-70.
    Medical classification systems aim to provide a manageable taxonomy for sorting diagnoses into their proper classes. The question, this paper wants to critically examine, is how to correctly systematise diseases within classification systems that are applied in a variety of different settings. ICD and DSM , the two major classification systems in medicine and psychiatry, will be the main subjects of this paper; however, the arguments are not restricted to these classification systems but point out general methodological and epistemological challenges (...)
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  39. added 2020-05-07
    Biological Psychiatry and Normative Problems: From Nosology to Destigmatization Campaigns.Romain Schneckenburger - 2011 - Medicine Studies 3 (1):9-17.
    Psychiatry is becoming a cognitive neuroscience. This new paradigm not only aims to give new ways for explaining mental diseases by naturalizing them, but also to have an influence on different levels of psychiatric norms. We tried here to verify whether a biological paradigm is able to fulfill this normative goal. We analyzed three main normative assumptions that is to say the will of giving psychiatry a valid nosology, a rigorous definition of what is a mental disease, and new tools (...)
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  40. added 2020-05-07
    Whose Disorder?: A Constructive MacIntyrean Critique of Psychiatric Nosology.W. A. Kinghorn - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):187-205.
    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has for decades been a locus of dispute between ardent defenders of its scientific validity and vociferous critics who charge that it covertly cloaks disputed moral and political judgments in scientific language. This essay explores Alasdair MacIntyre's tripartite typology of moral reasoning—"encyclopedia," "genealogy," and "tradition"—as an analytic lens for appreciation and critique of these debates. The DSM opens itself to corrosive neo-Nietzschean "genealogical" critique, such an analysis holds, only (...)
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  41. added 2020-05-07
    Foundations for a Realist Ontology of Mental Disease.Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2010 - Journal of Biomedical Semantics 1 (10):1-23.
    While classifications of mental disorders have existed for over one hundred years, it still remains unspecified what terms such as 'mental disorder', 'disease' and 'illness' might actually denote. While ontologies have been called in aid to address this shortfall since the GALEN project of the early 1990s, most attempts thus far have sought to provide a formal description of the structure of some pre-existing terminology or classification, rather than of the corresponding structures and processes on the side of the patient. (...)
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  42. added 2020-05-07
    What Makes “a Mental Illness?” What Makes “a New Mental Illness”?: The Cases of Solastalgia and Hubris Syndrome.Seamus P. MacSuibhne - 2009 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 5 (2):210-225.
    What is a “mental illness”? What is an “illness”? What does the description and classification of “mental illnesses” actually involve, and is the description of “new” mental illnesses description of actually existing entities, or the creation of them? “Solastalgia” is a neologism, invented by the Australian environmental philosopher Glenn Albrecht, to give greater meaning and clarity to psychological distres s caused by environmental change The concept received some coverage in the international mass media in late 2007 Much of this described (...)
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  43. added 2020-05-07
    Is Disorder X in Category or Spectrum Y? General Considerations and Application to the Relationship Between Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Anxiety Disorders.Dj Stein - 2008 - Depression and Anxiety 25:330-335.
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  44. added 2020-05-07
    The Reality and Classification of Mental Disorders.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2008 - Dissertation, University of Chicago
    This dissertation examines psychiatry from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing on issues of realism and classification. Questions addressed in the dissertation include: What evidence is there for the reality of mental disorders? Are any mental disorders natural kinds? When are disease explanations of abnormality warranted? How should mental disorders be classified? -/- In addressing issues concerning the reality of mental disorders, I draw on the accounts of realism defended by Ian Hacking and William Wimsatt, arguing that biological research on (...)
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  45. added 2020-05-07
    Vice and the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Disorders: A Philosophical Case Conference.John Z. - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (1):1-17.
    This main article for a Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology philosophical case conference is intended to raise philosophical, psychiatric, and public policy issues concerning the relationship between concepts of criminality, mental disorder, and the classification of mental disorders. After introducing the basic problem of the confounding of “vice” and mental disorder concepts in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition—Text Revision, the author summarizes three different cases from the literature that illustrate the problem of the vice–mental disorder relationship. (...)
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  46. added 2020-05-07
    The Validity of Psychiatric Nosology.Claire Louise Pouncey - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    This dissertation has three tasks: to analyze the philosophy behind our current psychiatric nosology, to analyze and refute the myriad criticisms of that nosology, and to provide a more sophisticated understanding of what it is to have nosologic validity in general. Whereas most disease classifications do not generate much controversy, the current psychiatric nosology, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders constitutes a nearly universal focus for criticism, usually on philosophical grounds. However, neither critics not proponents of the DSM (...)
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  47. added 2020-05-07
    A Disease by Any Other Name: Musings on the Concept of a Genetic Disease.Kelly C. Smith - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):19-30.
    What exactly is a genetic disease? For a phrase one hears on a daily basis, there has been surprisingly little analysis of the underlying concept. Medical doctors seem perfectly willing to admit that the etiology of disease is typically complex, with a great many factors interacting to bring about a given condition. On such a view, descriptions of diseases like cancer as geneticseem at best highly simplistic, and at worst philosophically indefensible. On the other hand, there is clearly some practical (...)
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  48. added 2020-05-07
    The Controversy Over the Classification of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome, 1800-1995.Howard I. Kushner & L. S. Kiessling - 1996 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 39 (3):409-435.
  49. added 2020-05-07
    Foundations of the New Nosology.Mark J. Sedler - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (3):219-238.
    DSM-III and its revisions have provided little in the way of explicit historical or philosophical foundations. The logical empiricism embedded in its operational criteria and its external approach to validation are inadequate to account for the presumption of nosological regularities or the specific categories endorsed by the taxonomy. The nosologic operation that Jaspers referred to as the "synthesis of disease entities" is explored in connection with the central distinction in DSM-IV between mood disorders and schizophrenic disorders. This synthetic operation is (...)
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  50. added 2020-05-07
    Molecular Genetics, Reductionism, and Disease Concepts in Psychiatry.Herbert W. Harris & Kenneth F. Schaffner - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):127-153.
    The study of mental illness by the methods of molecular genetics is still in its infancy, but the use of genetic markers in psychiatry may potentially lead to a Virchowian revolution in the conception of mental illness. Genetic markers may define novel clusters of patients having diverse clinical presentations but sharing a common genetic and mechanistic basis. Such clusters may differ radically from the conventional classification schemes of psychiatric illness. However, the reduction of even relatively simple Mendelian phenomena to molecular (...)
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