Results for 'Donald R. Brand'

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  1. History of American Political Thought.John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
     
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  2.  45
    Animal Thinking.Donald R. Griffin - 1984 - Harvard University Press.
  3.  22
    The Question of Animal Awareness: Evolutionary Continuity of Mental Experience.Donald R. Griffin - 1981 - William Kaufmann.
  4.  72
    Animal Minds.Donald R. Griffin - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    University of Chicago Press, 2001 Review by Adriano Palma, Ph.D. on Aug 1st 2001 Volume: 5, Number: 31.
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  5.  44
    Prospects for a Cognitive Ethology.Donald R. Griffin - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):527-538.
  6. Historians and Ideologues Essays in Honor of Donald R. Kelley.Donald R. Kelley, Anthony Grafton & J. H. M. Salmon - 2001
     
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  7. Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness.Donald R. Griffin - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Finally, in four chapters greatly expanded for this edition, Griffin considers the latest scientific research on animal consciousness, pro and con, and...
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  8. New Evidence of Animal Consciousness.Donald R. Griffin & G. B. Speck - 2004 - Animal Cognition 7 (1):5-18.
  9.  26
    The Cambridge Companion to Socrates.Donald R. Morrison (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Socrates is a collection of essays providing a comprehensive guide to Socrates, the most famous Greek philosopher. Because Socrates himself wrote nothing, our evidence comes from the writings of his friends (above all Plato), his enemies, and later writers. Socrates is thus a literary figure as well as a historical person. Both aspects of Socrates' legacy are covered in this volume. Socrates' character is full of paradox, and so are his philosophical views. These paradoxes have led (...)
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  10.  15
    Thinking About Animal Thoughts.Donald R. Griffin - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):364.
  11.  12
    Aging, DNA Information, and Authorship: Medawar, Schrödinger, and Samuel Butler.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (1):50-55.
    Eminent scientists are well-placed to bring the novel works of others, even if not in their own areas of expertise, to general attention. In so doing, they may be able to extend original accounts or introduce new terminologies, but they are basically messengers, not innovators. In the 1940s an evolutionary theory of biological aging was explained by Peter Medawar, and informational concepts relating to DNA were explained by Erwin Schrödinger. Both explanations were eventually traced back to the Victorian polymath Samuel (...)
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  12.  57
    Consciousness as Self-Function.Donald R. Perlis - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):509-25.
    I argue that consciousness is an aspect of an agent's intelligence, hence of its ability to deal adaptively with the world. In particular, it allows for the possibility of noting and correcting the agent's errors, as actions performed by itself. This in turn requires a robust self-concept as part of the agent's world model; the appropriate notion of self here is a special one, allowing for a very strong kind of self-reference. It also requires the capability to come to see (...)
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  13.  78
    Null Hypotheses in Ecology.Donald R. Strong - 1980 - Synthese 43 (2):271-285.
  14.  12
    Belief Systems Today.Donald R. Kinder - 2006 - Critical Review 18 (1-3):197-216.
    My purpose is to offer an assessment of the scientific legacy of Converse's ?Belief Systems? by reviewing five productive lines of research stimulated by his authoritative analysis and unsettling conclusions. First I recount the later life history of Converse's notion of ?nonattitudes,? and suggest that as important as nonattitudes are, we should be paying at least as much attention to their opposite: attitudes held with conviction. Second, I argue that the problem of insufficient information that resides at the center of (...)
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  15. The Descent of Ideas the History of Intellectual History.Donald R. Kelley - 2002
  16.  41
    Intellectual History in a Global Age.Donald R. Kelley - 2005 - Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (2):155-167.
  17.  21
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On a statistical basis a (...)
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  18.  26
    What is Happening to the History of Ideas?Donald R. Kelley - 1990 - Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (1):3.
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  19.  13
    Horizons Of Intellectual History: Retrospect, Circumspect, Prospect.Donald R. Kelley - 1987 - Journal of the History of Ideas 48 (January-March):143-169.
  20.  35
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-–Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On a statistical basis a (...)
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  21.  14
    Developing a Learning Community Approach to Business Ethics Education.Donald R. Nelson & Dennis P. Wittmer - 2001 - Teaching Business Ethics 5 (3):267-281.
  22. Levinas and Twentieth-Century Literature: Ethics and the Reconstitution of Subjectivity.Donald R. Wehrs - 2013 - University of Delaware Press.
    Levinas and Twentieth-Century Literature considers how the work of the century’s most original ethical thinker may reshape understandings of modernism, postmodernism, postcolonialism, feminism, gender studies, and globalism. Tracing how modernist technique and anti-totalizing ethics enter into relations that, by the turn of the twenty-first century, not only revitalize diverse national literatures but also produce post-national, migrant, or hybrid literatures, the collection illuminates the ethical within literature while disclosing the literary contexts of Levinasian ethics.
     
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  23.  5
    Heredity as Transmission of Information: Butlerian 'Intelligent Design'.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2006 - Centaurus 48 (3):133-148.
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  24.  4
    Creep of Polycrystalline Lithium Fluoride.Donald R. Cropper & Terence G. Langdon - 1968 - Philosophical Magazine 18 (156):1181-1192.
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  25.  22
    Eclecticism and the History of Ideas.Donald R. Kelley - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):577-592.
  26.  3
    Timing of Skilled Motor Performance: Tests of the Proportional Duration Model.Donald R. Gentner - 1987 - Psychological Review 94 (2):255-276.
  27.  64
    Significant Uncertainty is Common in Nature.Donald R. Griffin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):346-346.
    In animals' natural lives, uncertainty is normal; and certainty, exceptional. Evaluating ambiguous information is essential for survival: Does what is seen, heard, or smelled mean danger? Does that gesture mean aggression or fear? Is he confident or uncertain? If they are conscious of anything, the content of animals' awareness probably includes crucial uncertainties, both their own and those of others.
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  28.  57
    Regressive Tax Rates and the Unethical Taxation of Salaried Income.Donald R. Nichols & William F. Wempe - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):553-566.
    In a regressive tax system, lower-income taxpayers pay larger percentages of their incomes in taxes compared to higher-income taxpayers. Although most policymakers and citizens view regressive taxation as generally unfair and unethical, the U.S. tax system taxes wage, salary, and self-employment income in a manner that deliberately subjects lower-income taxpayers to marginal tax rates that are greater than those imposed on higher-income taxpayers. As a result, some lower-income taxpayers pay a larger percentage of their income in taxes than higher-income taxpayers. (...)
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  29.  7
    Phenomenal Awareness and Self-Presentation.Donald R. Gorassini - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):519-520.
  30.  30
    Dharma In Practice: Ācāra And Authority In Medieval Dharmaśāstra. [REVIEW]Donald R. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (5-6):813-830.
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  31.  14
    Immunology : The Natural Selection Theory, the Two Signal Hypothesis and Positive Repertoire Selection.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):139-161.
    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne’s later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: 1–9), (...)
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  32.  10
    Introns First.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):196-203.
    Knowing how introns originated should greatly enhance our understanding of the information we carry in our DNA. Gilbert’s suggestion that introns initially arose to facilitate recombination still stands, though not for the reason he gave. Reanney’s alternative, that evolution, from the early “RNA world” to today’s DNA-based world, would require the ability to detect and correct errors by recombination, now seems more likely. Consistent with this, introns are richer than exons in the potential to extrude the stem-loop structures needed for (...)
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  33.  13
    Immunology (1955-1975): The Natural Selection Theory, the Two Signal Hypothesis and Positive Repertoire Selection. [REVIEW]Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):139 - 161.
    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne's later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: 1-9), (...)
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  34.  10
    Ohno's Hypothesis and Muller's Paradox: Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation May Serve Collective Gene Functions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (11):930-933.
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  35.  2
    Creep of Lithium Fluoride Single Crystals at Elevated Temperatures.Donald R. Cropper & Joseph A. Pask - 1973 - Philosophical Magazine 27 (5):1105-1124.
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  36.  23
    Animal Consciousness.Donald R. Griffin - 1985 - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 9:615-22.
  37.  17
    Jurisconsultus Perfectus: The Lawyer as Renaissance Man.Donald R. Kelley - 1988 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 51:84-102.
  38.  11
    Commentary Upon 'Should Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations Be Less Adversarial?'.Donald R. Koehn - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):293 - 295.
    My commentary calls attention to what makes Mr. Bowie's paper well worth intensive consideration. In my brief evaluation, however, I only lay out three incoherent elements of his proposed family model of labor-management relations.I argue that complete job security is not compatible with complete freedom to change firms; that, in practice, such security for all employees is not compatible with the shifting demand of our economic system, and that the model includes two kinds of spouse relationships — one affectional and (...)
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  39.  16
    On the Behavioural Interpretation of Neurophysiological Observation.Donald R. J. Laming - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):209-209.
    Examples of terror generated by an aircraft disaster, of human courtship behaviour, and of the application of laboratory techniques to the commercial training of animals suggest (1) that emotion is simply the subjective counterpart of (objective) motivation (so that separate brain mechanisms would be an embarrassment) and (2) the apparent involvement of reward and punishment is a consequence of the excessively narrow range of experimental procedures used and has no foundation in the design of the brain.
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  40. The Old Cultural History.Donald R. Kelley - 1996 - History of the Human Sciences 9 (3):101-126.
  41. Gusdorfiad.Donald R. Kelley - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (1):123-140.
  42.  23
    A Realist View of Hindu Law.Donald R. Davis - 2006 - Ratio Juris 19 (3):287-313.
    . Hindu law represents one of the least known, yet most sophisticated traditions of legal theory and jurisprudence in world history. Hindu jurisprudential texts contain elaborate and careful philosophical reflections on the nature of law and religion. The nature of Hindu law as a tradition has been subject to some debate and some misunderstanding both within and especially outside of specialist circles. The present essay utilizes the familiar framework of legal realism to describe the fundamental concepts of law and legal (...)
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  43.  42
    Intellectual History and Cultural History: The Inside and the Outside.Donald R. Kelley - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (2):1-19.
    What is the relationship between intellectual and cultural history? An answer to this question may be found in the area between the two poles of inquiry commonly known as internalist and externalist methods. The first of these deals with old-fashioned `ideas' (in Lovejoy's sense) and the second with social and political context and the sociology and anthropology of knowledge. This article reviews this question in the light of the earlier historiography of philosophy, literature and science, and debates over the role (...)
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  44.  22
    An Analysis of Bowles's and Gintis's Thesis That Schools Reproduce Economic Inequality1.Donald R. Tunnell - 1978 - Educational Theory 28 (4):334-342.
  45.  16
    From the Executive Editor.Donald R. Kelley - 2005 - Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (4):475-476.
  46.  17
    Al-Bīrūnī's Mechanical Calendar.Donald R. Hill - 1985 - Annals of Science 42 (2):139-163.
    Summary This paper is concerned with a mechanical calendar described by the great scientist al-B?r?n?, who died in 440/1048. The description occurs in a book devoted to the construction of various types of astrolabe and related instruments. The Arabic text presented in this paper was prepared from three manuscripts. This is preceded by a brief introduction which gives a sketch of the life and works of al-B?r?n? together with information about the provenance and contents of the three manuscripts. The text (...)
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  47.  16
    A Past for the Present: History, Education, and Public Policy.Donald R. Warren - 1978 - Educational Theory 28 (4):253-265.
  48.  9
    Paradoxical Consequences of Conflict: Interference and Facilitation.Donald R. Yelen - 1979 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 14 (2):121-123.
  49. The Cosmological Arguments.Donald R. Burrill - 1967 - Garden City, N.Y., Anchor Books.
  50.  23
    Familiarization (N) as a Stimulus Factor in Paired-Associate Verbal Learning.Donald R. Gannon & Clyde E. Noble - 1961 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (1):14.
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