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  1. Philip E. Devine. Human Diversity and the Culture Wars: Philosophical Perspectives on Contemporary Cultural Conflict. (Wesport, Connecticut: Praeger.) Pp. 192. £43.95. [REVIEW]B. A. - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (2):231-234.
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  2. Dzieje Filozofii Europejskiej XV Wieku, Vol. IV.N. W. A. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):204-206.
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  3. The Cosmological Argument.Robert Merrihew Adams & William L. Rowe - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (3):445.
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  4. Speculations on the Cosmological Argument.Roy Ahmed-Jackson - 1998 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (3):32-33.
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  5. The Recent Revival of Cosmological Arguments.David Alexander - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (3):541–550.
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  6. Cosmological and Civilized Harmonies.George Allan - 2008 - In Michel Weber (ed.), Handbook of Whiteheadian Process Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 41-54.
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  7. A Thirteenth Century Cosmological Argument.Thomas Aquinas - 2000 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Howard College Campus.Deane Baker - unknown
    1. General. Explain briefly why the question, Do you believe in God? is ambiguous. (6) 2. The premodern period: (i) Set out as clearly as possible the cosmological argument for the existence of God. (ii) Explain why this does not entail infinite regress. (5) 3. The early modern period: Has the argument from the orderliness of nature (design) something new to add to the approach of the cosmological argument, by focussing on “natural” religion? Explain briefly. (5) 4. The later modern (...)
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  9. The Cosmological Argument: A Current Bibliographical Appraisal.W. Beck - 2000 - Philosophia Christi 2 (2):283-306.
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  10. A Note on Religious Experience Arguments: LAWRENCE C. BECKER.Lawrence C. Becker - 1971 - Religious Studies 7 (1):63-68.
    When philosophers speak of the inconclusiveness of arguments for the existence of God, they often do so as if they were talking about a matter of principle—as if it were in principle impossible to prove God's existence, that every proof was in principle inconclusive. Of course, rebutals of the cosmological, ontological, and teleological arguments are usually designed to show that these types of arguments are in principle inconclusive. But one supposes that religious experience arguments are not all in such difficulties. (...)
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  11. The Cosmological Argument—Revisited and Revised.Peter A. Bertocci - 1967 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 41:149-159.
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  12. The Cosmological Argument.Lionel Blain - 1967 - World Futures 5 (4):82-83.
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  13. God, Time and the Kalām Cosmological Argument.Christopher Alan Bobier - 2013 - Sophia 52 (4):593-600.
    The Kalām cosmological argument deploys the following causal principle: whatever begins to exist has a cause. Yet, under what conditions does something ‘begin to exist’? What does it mean to say that ‘X begins to exist at t’? William Lane Craig has offered and defended various accounts that seek to establish the necessary and sufficient conditions for when something ‘begins to exist.’ I argue that all of the accounts that William Lane Craig has offered fail on the following grounds: either (...)
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  14. Cosmological Arguments and the Actual Infinity.Mašan Bogdanovski - 2001 - Theoria 44 (1-4):95-108.
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  15. The Kalam Cosmological Argument. By Wilham Lane Craig.Vernon J. Bourke - 1980 - Modern Schoolman 57 (4):371-371.
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  16. Cosmological Arguments.Raymond D. Bradley - unknown
    Although most cogently formulated by philosophers such as St Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), al Ghazali (1058-1111), and Gottfried Leibniz (1646- 1716), cosmological arguments have a powerful appeal also to those nonphilosophers who feel that the "ultimate" explanation for the existence of the natural universe is that it was created by some sort of supernatural entity, viz., God.
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  17. Van Inwagen on the Cosmological Argument.Anthony Brueckner - 2001 - Philosophical Papers 30 (1):31-40.
    Abstract In his book Metaphysics, Peter van Inwagen constructs a version of the Cosmological Argument which does not depend on the Principle of Sufficient Reason. He goes on to reject the argument. In this paper, I construct an alternative version of the Cosmological Argument that uses some of van Inwagen's insights and yet is immune to his criticisms. If we suppose that for each contingent truth, there is some at least partial explanation, then it follows that there is some necessary (...)
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  18. A Study of Ilm Ul Kalam with Special Reference to Sir Syed Ahmed Khan.Shafqat Bukhari - unknown
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  19. God? A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist. By William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong.Stephen Bullivant - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):538-539.
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  20. The Cosmological Arguments.Donald R. Burrill - 1967 - Garden City, N.Y., Anchor Books.
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  21. The Kaläm Cosmological Argument.E. B. C. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):376-378.
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  22. The Hume-Edwards Principle.James Cain - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (3):323 - 328.
    The Leibniz-Clarke version of the cosmological argument allows for the possibility that there might be a beginningless succession of objects, each produced by earlier objects in the succession, but it is held that a causal question would then arise as to what brought this whole succession of objects into being. This line of thought is commonly said to be confused and an appeal is made to a principle that if a causal explanation has been provided for each member of a (...)
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  23. A Concise Cosmological Argument From the Eleventh Century.Anselm of Canterbury - 2000 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  24. Cosmology and Creation: From Hawking to Aquinas.William E. Carroll - 2012 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 15 (1):134-149.
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  25. Craig B. Matarrese.Chandana Chakrabarti & Joel Wilcox - forthcoming - Philosophy.
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  26. Cosmological Forecast and Its Practical Significance.Milan M. Ćirković - 2002 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 12.
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  27. Driving Towards the Infinite.W. Norris Clarke - 1985 - Renascence 37 (3):171-172.
  28. Notes on Cosmological Speculation.Brian Coffey - 1952 - Modern Schoolman 29 (3):183-196.
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  29. Objections to Smith's Cosmological Argument (2008).Robin Collins - unknown
    In his opening case , Quentin Smith has presented an ingenious argument for the claim that the universe is self caused, and hence its existence is self explanatory. He then goes on to claim that the fact that the universe is self caused, and hence self explanatory, is inconsistent with theism. His main argument is based on the assumption that each temporal part of the universe has an explanation in terms of the temporal parts existing prior to it. The fundamental (...)
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  30. The Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Cosmological Argument.Howard Krebs Congdon - 1970 - Dissertation, Purdue University
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  31. Composition and the Cosmological Argument.L. Hughes Cox - 1974 - New Scholasticism 48 (3):365-370.
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  32. The Cosmological Argument.L. W. Craig - 2003 - In Paul Copan & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Noûs. Routledge. pp. 114--115.
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  33. Wallace Matson and the Crude Cosmological Argument.William L. Craig - 1979 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (2):163 – 170.
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  34. Graham Oppy on the Kalam Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):303-330.
    Graham Oppy has emerged as one of the kalam cosmological argument’s most formidable opponents. He rejects all four of the arguments drawn from metaphysics and physics for the second premiss that the universe began to exist. He also thinks that we have no good reason to accept the first premiss that everything that begins to exist has a cause. In this response, I hope to show that the kalam cosmological argument is, in fact, considerably stronger than Oppy claims, surviving even (...)
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  35. Reflections On “Uncaused Beginnings”.William Lane Craig - 2010 - Faith and Philosophy 27 (1):72-78.
    Graham Oppy’s interesting analysis of the “causal shape” of reality conflates causal ordering with temporal ordering of causes and assigns the wrong causal shape to reality as conceived by many classical theists. His argument for the possibility of uncaused beginnings is also hobbled by his tendency to ignore the crucial issue of the objective reality of tense and temporal becoming. Oppy’s claims that only certain types of things can come into being uncaused at a first moment of time and that (...)
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  36. Taking Tense Seriously in Differentiating Past and Future.William Lane Craig - 2010 - Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):451-456.
    Wes Morriston argues that even if we take an endless series of events to be merely potentially, rather than actually, infinite, still no distinction between a beginningless and an endless series of events has been established which is relevant to arguments against the metaphysical possibility of an actually infinite number of things: if a beginningless series is impossible, so is an endless series. The success of Morriston’s argument, however, comes to depend on rejecting the characterization of an endless series of (...)
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  37. The Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 2008 - In Paul Copan & Chad V. Meister (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: Classic and Contemporary Issues. Blackwell.
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  38. A Response to Grünbaum on Creation and Big Bang Cosmology.William Lane Craig - 1994 - Philosophia Naturalis 31 (2):247.
  39. Graham Oppy on the Kalām Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1993 - Sophia 32 (1):1-11.
    In conclusion, then, I think that the refutations proffered by Mackie of thekalām cosmological argument were all too quick and easy. Nor do I think Oppy has succeeded in rehabilitating those refutations.
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  40. God and the Initial Cosmological Singularity.William Lane Craig - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (2):238-248.
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  41. Professor Mackie and the KalĀm Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):367.
    Like David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion , J. L. Mackie's most potent blast against the rationality of belief in God, his The Miracle of Theism , appeared after his death. The book is a broadside against not only the traditional arguments for God's existence, such as the onto-, cosmo-, and teleological arguments, but also against proofs from consciousness, miracles, the idea of God, and so forth, and against the validity of religious experience and faith without reason, and it presents (...)
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  42. Dilley's Misunderstandings of the Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1979 - New Scholasticism 53 (3):388-392.
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  43. The Kalam Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1979 - In Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie. Rutgers University Press. pp. 383-383.
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  44. The Kalām Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1979 - Noûs 16 (2):328-334.
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  45. A Further Critique of Reichenbach's Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1978 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (1):53 - 60.
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  46. The Cosmological Argument: Assessment of a Reassessment. [REVIEW]Houston Craighead - 1975 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (2):117 - 124.
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  47. The Cosmological Argument, Sufficient Reason, and Why-Questions.Dan D. Crawford - 1980 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (2):111 - 122.
    To sum up the main results of this study: I have disentangled two distinct patterns of argument that Taylor runs together in his attempt to show that there is a reason or explanation for the world as a whole. The first is based on the causal dependency of things in the world, the second is based on their logical contingency. It seems to make the most sense of Taylor's discussion if we interpret him not as invoking the principle of sufficient (...)
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  48. Is the Cosmological Argument Dependent Upon the Ontological Argument?Patricia A. Crawford - 1981 - Sophia 20 (3):27-31.
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  49. H.A. Meynell, "The Intelligible Universe: A Cosmological Argument".R. E. Creel - 1987 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 21 (2):121.
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  50. The Cosmological Approach to Theism: A Study in Contemporary British Philosophy.Floyd Dale Crenshaw - 1964 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
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