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  1. Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter - 2020 - In Dana Jalobeanu & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) profoundly shaped early eighteenth-century European philosophy with an a priori demonstration of the existence of God and influential defenses of substance dualism and human freedom. Throughout his works, he defended absolute space, the passivity of matter, and constant divine activity in the world, which jointly provided a metaphysical basis for the quickly popularizing Newtonian thought.
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  2. A Neglected Additament: Peirce on Logic, Cosmology, and the Reality of God.Jon Alan Schmidt - 2018 - Signs 9 (1):1-20.
    Two different versions of the ending of the first additament to C. S. Peirce's 1908 article, "A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God," appear in the Collected Papers but were omitted from The Essential Peirce. In one, he linked the hypothesis of God's Reality to his entire theory of logic as semeiotic, claiming that proving the latter would also prove the former. In the other, he offered a final outline of his cosmology, in which the Reality of God as (...)
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  3. Susanna Newcome's Cosmological Argument.Patrick J. Connolly - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (4):842-859.
    Despite its philosophical interest, Susanna Newcome’s Enquiry Into the Evidence of the Christian Religion (1728, revised 1732) has received little attention from commentators. This paper seeks to redress this oversight by offering a reconstruction of Newcome’s innovative argument for God’s existence. Newcome employs a cosmological argument that differs from Thomist and kalām version of the argument. Specifically, Newcome challenges that idea that the causal chains observed in nature can exist independently. She does this through an appeal to findings from Newtonian (...)
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  4. Aquinas and the Question of God's Existence: Exploring the Five Ways.Damian Ilodigwe - forthcoming - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 2018 (1).
    Without doubt, St Thomas Aquinas was the greatest of the medieval philosophers. Aquinas was a prolific writer and he made contributions to virtually every area of Philosophy and Theology. His account of the existence of God is perhaps the best known aspect of his work. This is especially true of the celebrated five arguments he adduced in demonstration of the existence of God. In exploring Aquinas’ Five ways, which some commentators regard as Aquinas’ substantive contribution to Philosophy of religion, our (...)
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  5. Thinking Matter in Locke's Proof of God's Existence.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    Commentators almost universally agree that Locke denies the possibility of thinking matter in Book IV Chapter 10 of the Essay. Further, they argue that Locke must do this in order for his proof of God’s existence in the chapter to be successful. This paper disputes these claims and develops an interpretation according to which Locke allows for the possibility that a system of matter could think (even prior to any act of superaddition on God’s part). In addition, the paper argues (...)
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  6. The Third Meditation: Causal Arguments for God's Existence.Lawrence Nolan - 2014 - In David Cunning (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Descartes' Meditations. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. pp. 127-48.
  7. Erratum To: Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument.Travis Dumsday - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):125-125.
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  8. Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument.Travis Dumsday - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):111-123.
    In reply to certain cosmological arguments for theism, critics regularly argue that the causal principle ex nihilo nihil fit may be false. Various theistic counter-replies to this challenge have emerged. One type of strategy is to double down on ex nihilo nihil fit. Another, very different strategy of counter-reply is to grant for the sake of argument that the principle is false, while maintaining that sound cosmological arguments can be formulated even with this concession in place. Notably, one can employ (...)
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  9. El conocimiento natural de Dios según san Pablo.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2016 - In Mercedes López Salvá, Ignacio Sanz Extremeño & Pablo de Paz Amérigo (eds.), Los orígenes del cristianismo en la filosofía, la literatura y el arte I. Madrid: Dykinson. pp. 157-200.
    This article studies the issue of natural knowledge of God in the Bible verses which speak most explicitly about it: Romans 1,18-32. 'Natural knowledge' means here knowledge accessible to all men by virtue of their innate forces, possible even for those who have not partaken in the biblical revelalion. St. Paul's passage is compared with Wisdom 13-15, which shares many doctrinal points with it. The Pauline discourse, though inserted into a theological reasoning within the perspective of faith, represents a truly (...)
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  10. Leibniz's Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God.Mogens Lærke - 2011 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (1):58-84.
    In this article, I discuss Leibniz's interpretation of the cosmological argument for the existence of God. In particular, I consider whether Leibniz's position on this point was developed partly in reference to Spinoza's position. First, I analyze Leibniz's annotations from 1676 on Spinoza's Letter 12. The traditional cosmological argument, as found in Avicenna and Saint Thomas for example, relies on the Aristotelian assumption that an actual infinite is impossible and on the idea that there can be no effect without a (...)
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  11. Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency. [REVIEW]Peter Forrest - 2009 - Analysis 69 (3):589-591.
    In this book Timothy O’Connor combines an investigation of modal epistemology with a fresh look at the traditional contingency version of the cosmological argument. The connection between the two parts is that he defends the practice of hypothesizing necessities for explanatory purposes, resisting those accounts that link possibility too closely to conceivability. This provides the context in which he asks the existence question, ‘Why do the particular contingent objects there are exist and undergo the events they do?’. Wisely avoiding the (...)
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  12. Wallace Matson and the Crude Cosmological Argument.William L. Craig - 1979 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57:163.
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  13. God? A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist. By William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Stephen Bullivant - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):538-539.
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  14. The Cosmological Argument. [REVIEW]H. M. J. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (2):330-331.
    The stated aim of this investigation is to clarify and critically examine the philosophical concepts inherent in the cosmological argument: he aspires to investigate the argument rather than to either refute critics or support defenders. He treats both the thirteenth century versions of Aquinas and Duns Scotus and the eighteenth century versions developed by Samuel Clarke and Leibniz, but attaches greater importance and spends more time with the latter, finding them both more sophisticated and more fruitful for investigation. The eighteenth (...)
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  15. Dzieje Filozofii Europejskiej XV Wieku, Vol. IV: "Bog". [REVIEW]N. W. A. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):204-206.
    The third volume of The History of European Philosophy in the Fifteenth Century deals with the question of "being." In the closing paragraph, Stefan Swiezawski remarks: "Studies on the transformation and distortion of St. Thomas's doctrine on being, especially in regard to its existential element, are fundamentally important for understanding the factual historical development of Thomism as well as for understanding modern Christian thought. They are also of utmost importance for understanding the mainspring and resultant trends which have shaped the (...)
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  16. The Kaläm Cosmological Argument. [REVIEW]E. B. C. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):376-378.
    The title of this volume is somewhat misleading. Though the author begins his argument with a cursory account of medieval Islamic thought and of dialectical theology or kaläm, his subsequent exposition of the way three medieval thinkers adapted the basic features of kaläm tenets to their own arguments on behalf of God's existence is far less detailed or nuanced than his investigation of the shortcomings in nineteenth and twentieth century Western materialist explanations of the universe grounded in modern mathematics and (...)
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  17. Concerning the Metaphysical Necessity of the Universe Beginning Uncaused: A Reply to George Nakhnikian.Quentin Smith - 2000 - Philo 3 (1):73-75.
    In George Nakhnikian’s interesting and stimulating paper, “Quantum Cosmology, Theistic Philosophical Cosmology, and the Existence Question” he addresses the fundamental issue of whether it is metaphysically possible or justifiable to believe that our universe began to exist without a cause, divine or otherwise. His conclusion is negative, and he argues that, contrary to my views, quantum cosmology is consistent with theism. In this paper, I shall evaluate Nakhnikian’s arguments.
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  18. Quantum Cosmology and Theism: A Reply to Quentin Smith.Daniel Murphy - 2008 - Philo 11 (1):93-119.
    Quentin Smith has argued that quantum-cosmological theory is incompatible with theism. The two claims that Smith argues render theism inconsistent with Hawking’s theory are that of the initial creation of the universe by God and His continued conservation of it. His primary argument is that divine decision and Hawking’s wave function entail contradictory probabilities that the universe begin to exist and continue to evolve in a certain way. I attempt to refute the argument by providing a schema that accommodates probabilities (...)
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  19. Causes and Beginnings in the Kalam Argument: Reply to Craig.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (2):233-244.
  20. God and the Initial Cosmological Singularity: A Reply to Quentin Smith.William Lane Craig - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (2):238-248.
  21. Professor William Craig’s Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum.Graham Oppy - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
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  22. Beginningless Past and Endless Future: Reply to Craig.Wes Morriston - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (4):444-450.
    In a recent paper, I claimed that if a familiar line of argument against the possibility of a beginningless series of events worked as advertised, it would work just as well against the possibility of an endless series of pre-determined events. The present paper is my response to objections by William Lane Craig. It argues that neither Craig’s claim that an endless series of events is a merely potential infinite nor his claim that future events don’t exist is successful in (...)
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  23. Composition and the Cosmological Argument: A Trivial Issue.L. Hughes Cox - 1974 - New Scholasticism 48 (3):365-370.
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  24. Dilley’s Misunderstandings of the Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1979 - New Scholasticism 53 (3):388-392.
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  25. The Cosmological Argument: A Reassessment. [REVIEW]Stephen L. Weber - 1973 - New Scholasticism 47 (4):530-534.
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  26. The Cosmological Argument and Hegel’s Doctrine of God.Martin J. De Nys - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (3):343-372.
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  27. A Critical Assessment of Contemporary Cosmological Arguments: Towards a Renewed Case for Theism.G. J. E. Rutten - unknown
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  28. A Note on Cosmological Arguments.James L. Hudson - 1977 - Philosophy Research Archives 3:696-701.
    The central part of any cosmological argument for the existence of God is the inference of a conclusion of the form 1-Fx from a premiss of the form 1 Fx'. Since the premiss here is known only a posteriori, such an argument would ordinarily be classified as itself a posteriori. But I point out that any argument of this form may by a trivial modifi- cation be turned into an argument which requires no a posteriori premisses, and that the modified (...)
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  29. The Gale–Pruss Cosmological Argument: Tractarian and Advaita Hindu Objections.Richard Mcdonough - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (4):513-523.
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  30. An Open Infinite Future is Impossible.Alexander R. Pruss - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (4):461-464.
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  31. The Philosophy of the Kalam.Repercussions of the Kalam in Jewish Philosophy.Alfred L. Ivry & Harry Austryn Wolfson - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (4):653.
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  32. The Cosmological Argument.Robert Merrihew Adams & William L. Rowe - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (3):445.
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  33. Shāhnāma Munawwar KalāmShahnama Munawwar Kalam.Fritz Lehmann, Shiv Das Lakhnawi & Syed Hasan Askari - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (4):811.
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  34. On the Infinite God Objection: A Reply to Jacobus Erasmus and Anné Hendrik Verhoef.Andrew Loke - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):263-272.
    Erasmus and Verhoef suggest that a promising response to the infinite God objection to the Kalām cosmological argument include showing that abstract objects do not exist; actually infinite knowledge is impossible; and redefining omniscience as : for any proposition p, if God consciously thinks about p, God will either accept p as true if and only if p is true, or accept p as false if and only if p is false. I argue that there is insufficient motivation for showing (...)
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  35. The Cosmological Argument.David Oderberg - unknown
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  36. Can Causal Chains Extend Back Infinitely? Entailment, Determinism, and a Cosmological Argument.Travis Dumsday - 2014 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 19 (2):193-208.
    I develop a new argument to the effect that past causal chains cannot extend back infinitely, but must instead terminate in a first uncaused cause. It has the advantage of sidestepping a historically prominent objection to cosmological arguments of this general type, one leveled by Aquinas and various other Scholastics.
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  37. Cosmological Liturgy and a Sensible Priesthood.David W. Fagerberg - 2001 - New Blackfriars 82 (960):76-87.
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  38. A Note on Cosmological Arguments.Hugo Meynell - 1983 - New Blackfriars 64 (756):287-291.
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  39. The Cosmological Argument.Brian Davies O. P. - 1983 - New Blackfriars 64 (753):100-113.
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  40. No Heartbreak at Hilbert's Hotel: A Reply to Landon Hedrick.Andrew Loke - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (1):47-50.
    In his article, , Landon Hedrick argues that the (HHA) proposed by William Lane Craig is ineffective against proponents of presentism, who include Craig himself. I show that there is no heartbreak if the Hotel and persons are constructed and generated in a certain way: there exists a and a , they have been building hotel rooms and generating customers at regular time intervals as long as time exists, and the hotel rooms and customers have continued existing after they have (...)
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  41. On Finitism and the Beginning of the Universe: A Reply to Stephen Puryear.Andrew Ter Ern Loke - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):591-595.
    ABSTRACTStephen Puryear argues that William Lane Craig's view, that time as duration is logically prior to the potentially infinite divisions that we make of it, involves the idea that time is prior to any parts we conceive within it. He objects that PWT entails the Priority of the Whole with respect to Events, and that it subverts the argument, used by proponents of the Kalam Cosmological Argument such as Craig, against an eternal past based on the impossibility of traversing an (...)
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  42. On Beginningless Past, Endless Future, God, and Singing Angels: An Assessment of the Morriston-Craig Dialogue.Andrew Ter Ern Loke - 2016 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 58 (1):57-66.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophie Jahrgang: 58 Heft: 1 Seiten: 57-66.
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  43. Graham Oppy on the Kalām Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1993 - Sophia 32 (1):1-11.
    In conclusion, then, I think that the refutations proffered by Mackie of thekalām cosmological argument were all too quick and easy. Nor do I think Oppy has succeeded in rehabilitating those refutations.
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  44. An Infinite Temporal Regress is Compatible with the Doctrine of Creatio Originans.Paul Kabay - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 57 (2):123-138.
    In this paper I show that the existence of an infinite temporal regress does not undermine the soundness of Craigs version of the Kalam Cosmological Argument. To this end I shall focus on a particular complication that Craig raises against one of his arguments in support of a finite temporal regress. I will show that this complication can be made innocuous by extending the notion of A-theoretic time, which is presupposed by Craigs argument, to include a notion of temporal becoming (...)
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  45. Whole and Part in Cosmological, Arguments.R. G. Swinburne - 1969 - Philosophy 44 (170):339.
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  46. Professor Mackie and the KalĀm Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):367-375.
    Like David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion , J. L. Mackie's most potent blast against the rationality of belief in God, his The Miracle of Theism , appeared after his death. The book is a broadside against not only the traditional arguments for God's existence, such as the onto-, cosmo-, and teleological arguments, but also against proofs from consciousness, miracles, the idea of God, and so forth, and against the validity of religious experience and faith without reason, and it presents (...)
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  47. A Restricted Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Cosmological Argument.Alexander R. Pruss - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (2):165-179.
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR) says that, necessarily, every contingently true proposition has an explanation. The PSR is the most controversial premise in the cosmological argument for the existence of God. It is likely that one reason why a number of philosophers reject the PSR is that they think there are conceptual counter-examples to it. For instance, they may think, with Peter van Inwagen, that the conjunction of all contingent propositions cannot have an explanation, or they may believe that (...)
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  48. God is Random: A Novel Argument for the Existence of God.Serkan Zorba - 2016 - European Journal of Science and Theology 12 (1):51-67.
    Applying the concepts of Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity and Turing’s uncomputability from the computability and algorithmic information theories to the irreducible and incomputable randomness of quantum mechanics, a novel argument for the existence of God is presented. Concepts of ‘transintelligence’ and ‘transcausality’ are introduced, and from them, it is posited that our universe must be epistemologically and ontologically an open universe. The proposed idea also proffers a new perspective on the nonlocal nature and the infamous wave-function-collapse problem of quantum mechanics.
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  49. Unified Electromagnetic Fields.John Linus O'Sullivan - forthcoming - AuthorsDen.
    Abstract: Standing half wave particles at light speed twice in expansion-contraction comprise a static universe where two transverse fields 90° out of phase are the square of distance from each other. The universe has a static concept of time since the infinite universe is a static universe without a beginning or end. The square of distance is a point of reversal in expansion-contraction between the fields as a means to conserve energy. Photons on expansion in the electric field create matter (...)
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  50. On Herman Philipse’s Attempt to Write Off Cosmological Arguments.Emanuel Rutten - 2013 - Philo 16 (1):77-94.
    In his 2012 book God in the Age of Science? A Critique of Religious Reason Herman Philipse argues that all known deductive versions of the cosmological argument are untenable. His strategy is to propose a few objections to two classical deductive cosmological arguments. The first argument is from the impossibility of there being contingent entities that are the sufficient cause for the existence of a contingent entity. The second argument is from the impossibility of there being an infinite causal regress. (...)
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