Results for 'Human Knowledge'

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  1. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 2009 - Routledge.
    How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In _Human Knowledge,_ Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
  2. Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues.Roger Woolhouse & George Berkeley - 1988 - In Howard Robinson & George Berkeley (eds.), A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Penguin Books.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, (...)
     
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  3. Understanding Human Knowledge: Philosophical Essays.Barry Stroud - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Since the 1970s Barry Stroud has been one of the most original contributors to the philosophical study of human knowledge. This volume presents the best of Stroud's essays in this area. Throughout, he seeks to clearly identify the question that philosophical theories of knowledge are meant to answer, and the role scepticism plays in making sense of that question. In these seminal essays, he suggests that people pursuing epistemology need to concern themselves with whether philosophical scepticism is (...)
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  4.  17
    Methodologies for Studying Human Knowledge.John R. Anderson - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):467-477.
  5. Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues.George Berkeley - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, (...)
     
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  6. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus); medieval philosophy (Augustine, Aquinas); early modern philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Reid, Kant); classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism (James, Russell, Ayer, (...)
     
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  7.  37
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Berkeley and the Principles of Human Knowledge.Robert Fogelin - 2001 - Routledge.
    George Berkeley is one of the most prominent philosophers of the eighteenth century. His _Principles of Human Knowledge_ has become a focal point in the understanding of empiricist thought and the development of eighteenth century philosophy. This volume introduces and assesses: * Berkeley's life and the background to the _Principles_ * The ideas and text in the _Principles_ * Berkeley's continuing importance to philosophy.
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  8.  27
    Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science.Robert F. Almeder - 1991 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Blind Realism originated in the deeply felt conviction that the widespread acceptance of Gettier-type counterexamples to the classical definition of knowledge rests in a demonstrably erroneous understanding of the nature of human knowledge. In seeking to defend that conviction, Robert F. Almeder offers a fairly detailed and systematic picture of the nature and limits of human factual knowledge.
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  9.  93
    The Role of Cognitive Modeling for User Interface Design Representations: An Epistemological Analysis of Knowledge Engineering in the Context of Human-Computer Interaction. [REVIEW]Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting with the computer.We (...)
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  10. Essays 1932-1957 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1958 - Ox Bow Press.
    Introduction -- Light and life -- Biology and atomic physics -- Natural philosophy and human cultures -- Discussion with Einstein on epistemological problems in atomic physics -- Unity of knowledge -- Atoms and human knowledge -- Physical science and the problem of life.
     
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  11.  48
    Aristotle and the Problem of Human Knowledge.William Wians - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):41-64.
    I shall argue that, according to Aristotle, the knowledge we may attain is profoundly qualified by our status as human knowers. Throughout the corpus, Aristotle maintains a separation of knowledge at the broadest level into two kinds, human and divine. The separation is not complete—human knowers may enjoy temporarily what god or the gods enjoy on a continuous basis; but the division expresses a fact about humanity's place in the cosmos, one that imposes strict conditions (...)
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  12. Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge.Etienne Bonnot de Condillac - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Condillac's Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge, first published in French in 1746 and offered here in a new translation, represented in its time a radical departure from the dominant conception of the mind as a reservoir of innately given ideas. Descartes had held that knowledge must rest on ideas; Condillac turned this upside down by arguing that speech and words are the origin of mental life and knowledge. He argued, further, that language has its (...)
     
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  13. Essays 1958-1962 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1963 - Ox Bow Press.
    Quantum physics and philosophy--causality and complementarity -- The unit of human knowledge -- The connection between the sciences -- Light and life revisited -- The Rutherford memorial lecture 1958 -- The genesis of quantum mechanics -- The Solvay meetings and the development of quantum physics.
     
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  14.  86
    How to Be a Kantian and a Naturalist About Human Knowledge: Sellars’s Middle Way.James R. O’Shea - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:327–59.
    The contention in this paper is that central to Sellars’s famous attempt to fuse the “manifest image” and the “scientific image” of the human being in the world was an attempt to marry a particularly strong form of scientific naturalism with various modified Kantian a priori principles about the unity of the self and the structure of human knowledge. The modified Kantian aspects of Sellars’s view have been emphasized by current “left wing” Sellarsians, while the scientific naturalist (...)
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  15. The Unity of Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1963 - In Essays 1958--1962 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. Wiley. pp. 8--16.
     
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  16.  46
    How to Be a Kantian and a Naturalist About Human Knowledge.James R. O’Shea - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:327-359.
    The contention in this paper is that central to Sellars’s famous attempt to fuse the “manifest image” and the “scientific image” of the human being in the world was an attempt to marry a particularly strong form of scientific naturalism with various modified Kantian a priori principles about the unity of the self and the structure of human knowledge. The modified Kantian aspects of Sellars’s view have been emphasized by current “left wing” Sellarsians, while the scientific naturalist (...)
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  17. Berkeley's a Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge: An Introduction.P. J. E. Kail - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge is a crucial text in the history of empiricism and in the history of philosophy more generally. Its central and seemingly astonishing claim is that the physical world cannot exist independently of the perceiving mind. The meaning of this claim, the powerful arguments in its favour, and the system in which it is embedded, are explained in a highly lucid and readable fashion and placed in their historical context. Berkeley's philosophy is, in (...)
     
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  18. Atoms and Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1958 - In Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. Wiley. pp. 83--93.
  19.  72
    Berkeley, the Ends of Language, and the Principles of Human Knowledge.P. J. E. Kail - 2007 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt3):265-278.
    This paper discusses some key connections between Berkeley's reflections on language in the introduction to his Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge and the doctrines espoused in the body of that work, in particular his views on vulgar causal discourse and his response to the objection that his metaphysics imputes massive error to ordinary thought. I argue also that there is some mileage in the view that Berkeley's thought might be an early form of non-cognitivism.
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  20. A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.Jonathan Dancy (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition of Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge has been designed especially for the student reader. It also includes the four letters between George Berkeley and Samuel Johnson, written in 1729-30. The text is supplemented by a comprehensive introduction, an analysis of the text, a glossary, detailed notes, and a full bibliography with guidance on further reading. Published alongside Berkeley's other masterpiece, the Three Dialogues this new edition aims to give the reader a thorough introduction to the (...)
     
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  21.  11
    Non-Human Knowledge According to Michael Polanyi.Mihály Héder & Daniel Paksi - 2018 - Tradition and Discovery 44 (1):50-66.
    Three recent interpreters of tacit knowledge, Harald Grimen, Harry Collins, and John McDowell, either deny it is appropriate to attribute knowledge of any sort to animals or ignore the relevance of the tacit knowledge of animals to human knowledge. In this article, we seek to show that in Michael Polanyi’s understanding, tacit knowledge in animals underlies and supports human explicit knowledge. For Polanyi, tacit knowledge arises in increasingly complex forms in evolutionary (...)
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  22.  30
    Human Knowledge/Human Knowers: Comments on Michael Williams' “What's so Special About Human Knowledge?”.Jeremy Fantl - 2015 - Episteme 12 (2):269-273.
    In Michael Williams' “What's So Special About Human knowledge?” he argues that the kind of knowledge characteristic of adult humans is distinctive in that it involves epistemic responsibility. In particular, when an adult human has knowledge, they have a certain kind of epistemic authority, and that to attribute knowledge to them is to grant them a certain kind of authority over the subject matter. I argue that, while it is true that when we attribute (...)
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  23.  27
    Are There Foundations for Human Knowledge?Richard Garrett - 1991 - Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):19 - 33.
    Epistemology or the Theory of Knowledge has become one of the most complicated and esoteric areas of philosophy. This paper attempts to defend a form of foundationalism in epistemology which does not require the reader to be familiar with the philosophical literature; so, it should be of interest to psychologists concerned with the nature and character of human knowledge as well as, of course, to philosophers. The heart of the foundationalism defended here is the thesis that a (...)
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  24.  14
    Berkeley’s Theodicy in A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.Szymańska-Lewoszewska Marta - 2015 - Studia Z Historii Filozofii 5 (4):149-160.
    In this article I attempt to reconstruct Berkeley’s views on the nature of God and his Providence, as well as the way he refers to the problem of evil and justice in the world. My analysis is based on one of the early works by Berkeley, i.e. Principles of Human Knowledge. Its aim is to present Berkeley’s understanding of theodicy as different from the one suggested by Leibniz in Theodicy.
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  25.  12
    Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science.James Maffie & Robert Almeder - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):616.
    Philosophical discussions concerning the possibility of human knowledge of the external world have been largely influenced by the following picture.
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  26.  16
    On Quantity and Quality in Human Knowledge.Isabella Sarto-Jackson & Richard R. Nelson - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (3):273-280.
    Any discipline of human knowledge is characterized by three fundamental elements: the complexity of its content, the method used for its elaboration, and the language used for its expression. This article argues that any method for making knowledge is a particular combination of three main components that we can call science, art, and revelation. The right combination depends on the complexity of the slice of reality that we wish to understand in each case. Is there a relationship (...)
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  27.  11
    Contemplation Versus Reason An Inquiry Into Human Knowledge in the Light of Theory of Values.André Mercier - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (1):49.
    What is Contemplation? What is Reason? Will the answers to these questions allow one to compare and distinguish them on a common level? If this comparison and this distinction succeed and are to lead us to a better understanding of human knowledge, how do we have to conceive of that human knowledge itself? And, finally, if this is to be done in the light of a theory of values, what are values, and which values are there?
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  28.  16
    Karl Rahner on Materiality and Human Knowledge.Tiina Allik - 1985 - The Thomist 49 (3):367.
    Rahner presents an example of an ambivalent stance towards human materiality. the essay provides a discussion of rahner's use of the concept of materiality in his metaphysics of human knowledge and shows that rahner's anthropology contains two arguments which define the limitations of human materiality in different ways. one of these arguments affirms that human materiality is essential and good, whereas the other stand seems to deny the goodness and the permanence of human materiality.
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  29.  3
    On Quantity and Quality in Human Knowledge.Jorge Wagensberg - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (3):273-280.
    Any discipline of human knowledge is characterized by three fundamental elements: the complexity of its content, the method used for its elaboration, and the language used for its expression. This article argues that any method for making knowledge is a particular combination of three main components that we can call (a) science, (b) art, and (c) revelation. The right combination depends on the complexity of the slice of reality that we wish to understand in each case. Is (...)
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  30.  21
    Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science.James Maffie - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):616-618.
    Philosophical discussions concerning the possibility of human knowledge of the external world have been largely influenced by the following picture.
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  31. Condillac: Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge.Hans Aarsleff (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Condillac's Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge, first published in French in 1746 and offered here in a new translation, represented in its time a radical departure from the dominant conception of the mind as a reservoir of innately given ideas. Descartes had held that knowledge must rest on ideas; Condillac turned this upside down by arguing that speech and words are the origin of mental life and knowledge. He argued, further, that language has its (...)
     
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  32. Condillac: Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge.Hans Aarsleff (ed.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Condillac's Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge, first published in French in 1746 and offered here in a new translation, represented in its time a radical departure from the dominant conception of the mind as a reservoir of innately given ideas. Descartes had held that knowledge must rest on ideas; Condillac turned this upside down by arguing that speech and words are the origin of mental life and knowledge. He argued, further, that language has its (...)
     
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  33.  1
    Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science.Robert F. Almeder - 1991 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Blind Realism originated in the deeply felt conviction that the widespread acceptance of Gettier-type counterexamples to the classical definition of knowledge rests in a demonstrably erroneous understanding of the nature of human knowledge. In seeking to defend that conviction, Robert F. Almeder offers a fairly detailed and systematic picture of the nature and limits of human factual knowledge.
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  34. Condillac: Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge.Etienne Bonnot De Condillac - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Condillac's Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge, first published in French in 1746 and offered here in a new translation, represented in its time a radical departure from the dominant conception of the mind as a reservoir of innately given ideas. Descartes had held that knowledge must rest on ideas; Condillac turned this upside down by arguing that speech and words are the origin of mental life and knowledge. He argued, further, that language has its (...)
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  35.  5
    The Philosophy of Human Knowledge or, a Treatise on Language : A Course of Lectures, Delivered at the Utica Lyceum.A. B. Johnson - 1828 - G. & C. Carvill.
    Or a Treatise on Language. ... oironff inclination for na : this is one of the most s s language exposes'*! ... cs- •al, enables me to gratify my unenviable propensity. , Among the results is a Treatise on the Philosophy of / Human Knowledge.
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  36. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy ; medieval philosophy ; early modern philosophy ; classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism ; and other influential Anglo-American philosophers. Organized chronologically and thematically, Human (...), 3/e, features exceptionally broad coverage and nontechnical selections that are easily accessible to students. An ideal text for both undergraduate and graduate courses in epistemology, it is enhanced by the editors' substantial general introduction, section overviews, and up-to-date bibliographies. The third edition offers expanded selections on contemporary epistemology and adds selections by Thomas Reid, Richard Rorty, David B. Annis, Richard Feldman and Earl Conee, Ernest Sosa, Barry Stroud, and Louise M. Antony. Human Knowledge, 3/e, offers an unparalleled introduction to our ancient struggle to understand our own intellectual experience. (shrink)
     
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  37. Suarez on Human Knowledge of Singulars and the Medieval Tradition.James B. South - 1995 - Dissertation, Duke University
    It is acknowledged that Francisco Suarez had an excellent knowledge of the Medieval Scholastic tradition. In this project, I focus on one topic, human knowledge of material singulars, to determine Suarez's debt to and freedom from the Scholastic tradition. The representative thinkers of the Medieval tradition that I consider are Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. ;In the first two Chapters, I consider the accounts of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham on the (...)
     
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  38. Evolutionary and Developmental Foundations of Human Knowledge.Marc D. Hauser & Elizabeth Spelke - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press.
    What are the brain and cognitive systems that allow humans to play baseball, compute square roots, cook soufflés, or navigate the Tokyo subways? It may seem that studies of human infants and of non-human animals will tell us little about these abilities, because only educated, enculturated human adults engage in organized games, formal mathematics, gourmet cooking, or map-reading. In this chapter, we argue against this seemingly sensible conclusion. When human adults exhibit complex, uniquely human, culture-specific (...)
     
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  39.  74
    Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1958 - New York: Wiley.
    These articles and speeches by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist date from 1934 to 1958. Rather than expositions on quantum physics, the papers are philosophical in nature, exploring the relevance of atomic physics to many areas of human endeavor. Includes an essay in which Bohr and Einstein discuss quantum and_wave equation theories. 1961 edition.
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  40. Cognitive Practices: Human Language and Human Knowledge.Rita Nolan - 1994 - Blackwell.
    How does human language contribute to the cognitive edge humans have over other species? This question eludes most current theories of language and knowledge. Incorporating research results in psychology and cutting a path through a broad range of philosophical debates, Nolan develops a strikingly original account of language acquisition which holds important implications for standard theories of language and the philosophical foundations of cognitive science.
     
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  41.  10
    Kant, Bradley and The Conditionality of Human Knowledge.Daniel Herbert - 2013 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):47-74.
    The present paper makes three contentions with regard to the respective Kantian and Bradleyian accounts of the intrinsically problematic status of our epistemic predicament. First, it is in consequence of their common adherence to a view of the human intellect as both inherently qualified by its cognitive dependence upon the conditional phenomena of sensible experience and rationally committed to the pursuit of knowledge of the unconditional, that Kant and Bradley regard rational cognition as accountable to a standard which (...)
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  42. The Source of Philosophical Questions (Realistic Philosophy and Human Knowledge).P. Fotta - 2003 - Filozofia 58 (5):305-323.
    The author emphasize the fact, that the world of really existing compound and distinct things leads to the first questions in our spontaneous cognition of the world, such as: "What is it?", "What for?" Spontaneous cognition thus means the primary, direct experience of the real world, which is the basis of common sense. From common sense arise the first fundamental principles of thought and knowledge, such as "For that, what is, it is impossible not to be", expressed in natural (...)
     
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  43. Human Knowledge and Human Nature: A New Introduction to an Ancient Debate.Peter Carruthers - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary debates in epistemology devote much attention to the nature of knowledge, but neglect the question of its sources. This book focuses on the latter, especially on the question of innateness. Carruthers' aim is to transform and reinvigorate contemporary empiricism, while also providing an introduction to a range of issues in the theory of knowledge. He gives a lively presentation and assessment of the claims of classical empiricism, particularly its denial of substantive a priori knowledge and of (...)
     
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  44.  23
    Expert Systems and Human Knowledge: A View From the Sociology of Science. [REVIEW]Brian P. Bloomfield - 1988 - AI and Society 2 (1):17-29.
    After the setbacks suffered in the 1970s as a result of the ‘Lighthill Report’ (Lighthill, 1973), the science of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has undergone a dramatic revival of fortunes in the 1980s. But despite the obvious enormity and complexity of the problems tackled by AI, it still remains rather parochial in relation to the import of alternative though potentially fruitful ideas from other disciplines. With this in mind, the aim of the present paper is to utilise ideas from the sociology (...)
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  45.  22
    Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge: A Reader's Guide.Alasdair Richmond - 2009 - Continuum.
    Note on the text of the principles -- Context -- Biography -- Berkeley's philosophical background -- Overview of themes -- Teading the text -- The principles : introduction -- The principles : part one -- The objects and subject of knowledge : ideas and spirit -- Unperceived existence : a nicer strain of abstraction -- Problems for materialism -- A Cartesian dream argument -- The master argument -- From the inertness of ideas to the existence of God -- Philosophical (...)
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  46.  32
    East Asia and Human Knowledge—a Personal Quest.Lee Yu‐Ting - 2016 - Zygon 51 (1):71-85.
    This essay is a reflection on the ways we understand East Asia, as well as how East Asia is related to our knowledge construction. In spite of the personal tone, which I use strategically to formulate arguments in a carefully designed narrative flow, the article remains critical throughout and its conclusion is clear: exploration of the essence of East Asian civilization can constitute a meaningful effort to reevaluate and even restructure our current world of knowledge.
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  47.  18
    Finite Subjects in the Ethics: Spinoza on Indexical Knowledge, the First Person and the Individuality of Human Minds.Ursula Renz - 2013 - Renz, Ursula . Finite Subjects in the Ethics: Spinoza on Indexical Knowledge, the First Person and the Individuality of Human Minds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter suggests a new interpretation of Spinoza’s concept of mind claiming that the goal of the equation of the human mind with the idea of the body is not to solve the mind-body problem, but rather to show how we can, within the framework of Spinoza’s rationalism, conceive of finite minds as irreducibly distinguishable individuals. To support this view, the chapter discusses the passage from E2p11 to E2p13 against the background of three preliminaries, i.e. the notion of a (...)
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  48. Principles of Human Knowledge ;.George Berkeley - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosphers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth-century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. This edition of Berkeley's two key works has an introduction which examines and in part defends his arguments for idealism, as well as offering a detailed analytical contents list, extensive philosophical notes, and (...)
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  49. A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.George Berkeley & Colin M. Turbayne - 1907 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    Thorough introduction to the central ideas of one of the world's greatest philosophers.
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  50.  10
    The Principles of Human Knowledge.George Berkeley - 1937 - A. Brown & Sons.
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