Results for 'Peter Fine'

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  1.  53
    Varieties of Modal (Classificatory) and Comparative Probability.Peter Walley & Terrence L. Fine - 1979 - Synthese 41 (3):321 - 374.
  2. The Fine-Tuning Argument and the Requirement of Total Evidence.Peter Fisher Epstein - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (4):639-658.
    According to the Fine-Tuning Argument, the existence of life in our universe confirms the Multiverse Hypothesis. A standard objection to FTA is that it violates the Requirement of Total Evidence. I argue that RTE should be rejected in favor of the Predesignation Requirement, according to which, in assessing the outcome of a probabilistic process, we should only use evidence characterizable in a manner available before observing the outcome. This produces the right verdicts in some simple cases in which RTE (...)
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  3.  73
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Peter Kivy - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Peter Kivy is the author of many books on the history of art and, in particular, the aesthetics of music. This collection of essays spans a period of some thirty years and focuses on a richly diverse set of issues: the biological origins of music, the role of music in the liberal education, the nature of the musical work and its performance, the aesthetics of opera, the emotions of music, and the very nature of music itself. Some of these (...)
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  4. How Fine-Grained is Reality?Peter Fritz - 2017 - Filosofisk Supplement 13 (2):52-57.
  5.  9
    Author-Meets-Critics: Exceeding Our Grasp by Kyle Stanford.Arthur Fine, Peter Godfrey-Smith & Anjan Chakravartty - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):149-158.
    Two of the most potent challenges faced by scientific realism are the underdetermination of theories by data, and the pessimistic induction based on theories previously held to be true, but subsequently acknowledged as false. Recently, Stanford (2006, Exceeding our grasp: Science, history, and the problem of unconceived alternatives. Oxford: Oxford University Press) has formulated what he calls the problem of unconceived alternatives: a version of the underdetermination thesis combined with a historical argument of the same form as the pessimistic induction. (...)
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  6. Modes of Extension: Comments on Kit Fine's ‘In Defence of Three-Dimensionalism’: Peter Simons.Peter Simons - 2008 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 62:17-21.
    The debate between 3- and 4-dimensionalists is one of the most lively and pervasive in current metaphysics. At stake is a glittering prize: the correct metaphysical analysis of material things and other objects commonly thought to persist in time by enduring. Since we count ourselves among such objects the outcome of the debate is of more than merely academic interest to us. Obviously the ramifications of the debate, even of the points raised by Kit Fine, go far beyond what (...)
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  7.  6
    "Lectures on the Fine Arts": An Unpublished Manuscript of Thomas Reid's.Peter Kivy - 1970 - Journal of the History of Ideas 31 (1):17.
  8.  5
    Lectures on the Fine Arts.Thomas Reid & Peter Kivy - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (2):236-237.
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  9.  38
    Peter Aczel. Quantifiers, Games and Inductive Definitions. Proceedings of the Third Scandinavian Logic Symposium, Edited by Stig Kanger, Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, Vol. 82, North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam and Oxford, and American Elsevier Publishing Company, Inc., New York, 1975, Pp. 1–14. - Kit Fine. Some Connections Between Elementary and Modal Logic. Proceedings of the Third Scandinavian Logic Symposium, Edited by Stig Kanger, Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, Vol. 82, North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam and Oxford, and American Elsevier Publishing Company, Inc., New York, 1975, Pp. 15–31. - Bengt Hansson and Peter Gärdenfors. Filtations and the Finite Frame Property in Boolean Semantics. Proceedings of the Third Scandinavian Logic Symposium, Edited by Stig Kanger, Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, Vol. 82, North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam and Oxford, and American Elsevier Publishing Compa. [REVIEW]S. K. Thomason - 1978 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (2):373-376.
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  10.  10
    Peter Kivy, "Thomas Reid's Lectures on the Fine Arts". [REVIEW]D. D. Todd - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (4):534.
  11. Oronce Fine's Third & Fourth Books of Solar Horology, Comprizing His Exposition of The'new Quadrant of Profatius'.Peter I. Drinkwater & E. Dekker - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (4):426-426.
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  12.  14
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music Peter Kivy New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993, X + 373 Pp. [REVIEW]Paul Dumouchel - 1997 - Dialogue 36 (2):416-419.
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  13.  8
    Fine Tuning the HIF‐1 'Global' O2 Sensor for Hypobaric Hypoxia in Andean High‐Altitude Natives.Peter W. Hochachka & Jim L. Rupert - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (5):515-519.
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  14. Peter Kivy, The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music Reviewed By.Thomas Huhn - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14 (3):175-177.
     
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  15.  11
    Quantifiers, Games and Inductive Definitions.Peter Aczel, Stig Kanger, Kit Fine, Bengt Hansson & Jaakko Hintikka - 1978 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (2):373-376.
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  16. Fine-Tuning and Multiple Universes.Roger White - 2000 - Noûs 34 (2):260–276.
    ports the thesis that there exist very many universes. The view has found favor with a number of philosophers such as Derek Parfit ~1998!, J. J. C. Smart ~1989! and Peter van Inwagen ~1993!.1 My purpose is to argue that this is a mistake. First let me set out the issue in more detail.
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  17.  8
    Peter T. Coleman, Ph. D. Is the Director of the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR) at Teachers College, Columbia University, is Associate Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, a Member of the Faculty of Columbia University's Earth Institute, Chair of the International Project on Conflict and Complexity (IPCC). [REVIEW]Michelle Fine - 2011 - In Peter T. Coleman (ed.), Conflict, Interdependence, and Justice. Springer. pp. 11.
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  18.  3
    Vauvenargues and La Rochefoucauld.Peter Martin Fine - 1974 - [Totowa, N.J.]Rowman and Littlefield.
    Introduction Over a hundred years separate the date of the birth of François VI, duc de La Rochefoucauld, from that of Luc de Clapiers, ...
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  19.  13
    The Prosecutor Fine.Peter Duff - 1994 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 14 (4):565-587.
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  20.  21
    An Elementary Approach to the Fine Structure of L.Sy D. Friedman & Peter Koepke - 1997 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 3 (4):453-468.
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  21. Gettier Cases: A Taxonomy.Peter Blouw, Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2017 - In R. Borges, C. de Almeida & P. Klein (eds.), Explaining Knowledge: New Essays on the Gettier Problem. Oxford University Press. pp. 242-252.
    The term “Gettier Case” is a technical term frequently applied to a wide array of thought experiments in contemporary epistemology. What do these cases have in common? It is said that they all involve a justified true belief which, intuitively, is not knowledge, due to a form of luck called “Gettiering.” While this very broad characterization suffices for some purposes, it masks radical diversity. We argue that the extent of this diversity merits abandoning the notion of a “Gettier case” in (...)
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  22. Historical Magic in Old Quantum Theory?Peter Vickers - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (1):1-19.
    Two successes of old quantum theory are particularly notable: Bohr’s prediction of the spectral lines of ionised helium, and Sommerfeld’s prediction of the fine-structure of the hydrogen spectral lines. Many scientific realists would like to be able to explain these successes in terms of the truth or approximate truth of the assumptions which fuelled the relevant derivations. In this paper I argue that this will be difficult for the ionised helium success, and is almost certainly impossible for the (...)-structure success. Thus I submit that the case against the realist’s thesis that success is indicative of truth is marginally strengthened. (shrink)
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  23.  14
    Tenure is Fine, but Rank is Sublime.Douglas Peters - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):583-583.
    Does tenure serve its original purpose of promoting freedom of inquiry for academics in teaching and research? It seems not. Of concern is the finding that achieving tenure does not translate into a significant increase in exercise of freedom of inquiry either in teaching or research. Why? Promotion evaluation for associate professors by their senior colleagues has a continued inhibiting effect. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  24. Spatial, Temporal, and Modulatory Factors Affecting GasNet Evolvability in a Visually Guided Robotics Task.Philip Husbands, Andrew Philippides, Patricia Vargas, Christopher L. Buckley, Peter Fine, Ezequiel Di Paolo & Michael O'Shea - 2010 - Complexity 16 (2):35-44.
  25. Higher-Order Contingentism, Part 1: Closure and Generation.Peter Fritz & Jeremy Goodman - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 45 (6):645-695.
    This paper is a study of higher-order contingentism – the view, roughly, that it is contingent what properties and propositions there are. We explore the motivations for this view and various ways in which it might be developed, synthesizing and expanding on work by Kit Fine, Robert Stalnaker, and Timothy Williamson. Special attention is paid to the question of whether the view makes sense by its own lights, or whether articulating the view requires drawing distinctions among possibilities that, according (...)
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  26.  70
    The Intelligibility of Nature: How Science Makes Sense of the World.Peter Dear - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    Throughout the history of the Western world, science has possessed an extraordinary amount of authority and prestige. And while its pedestal has been jostled by numerous evolutions and revolutions, science has always managed to maintain its stronghold as the knowing enterprise that explains how the natural world works: we treat such legendary scientists as Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein with admiration and reverence because they offer profound and sustaining insight into the meaning of the universe. In The Intelligibility of Nature (...)
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  27.  10
    The Case for the 1593 Edition of Thomas Combe's Theater of Fine Devices.Peter M. Daly - 1986 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49:255-257.
  28. Theories of Aboutness.Peter Hawke - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (4):697-723.
    Our topic is the theory of topics. My goal is to clarify and evaluate three competing traditions: what I call the way-based approach, the atom-based approach, and the subject-predicate approach. I develop criteria for adequacy using robust linguistic intuitions that feature prominently in the literature. Then I evaluate the extent to which various existing theories satisfy these constraints. I conclude that recent theories due to Parry, Perry, Lewis, and Yablo do not meet the constraints in total. I then introduce the (...)
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  29.  21
    An Evaluation of Machine-Learning Methods for Predicting Pneumonia Mortality.Gregory F. Cooper, Constantin F. Aliferis, Richard Ambrosino, John Aronis, Bruce G. Buchanon, Richard Caruana, Michael J. Fine, Clark Glymour, Geoffrey Gordon, Barbara H. Hanusa, Janine E. Janosky, Christopher Meek, Tom Mitchell, Thomas Richardson & Peter Spirtes - unknown
    This paper describes the application of eight statistical and machine-learning methods to derive computer models for predicting mortality of hospital patients with pneumonia from their findings at initial presentation. The eight models were each constructed based on 9847 patient cases and they were each evaluated on 4352 additional cases. The primary evaluation metric was the error in predicted survival as a function of the fraction of patients predicted to survive. This metric is useful in assessing a model’s potential to assist (...)
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  30.  12
    Thomas Reid's Lectures on the Fine Arts. By Peter Kivy. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff. 1973 Pp. VII, 57. 11 Guilders.J. Charles Robertson - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (4):710-714.
  31. Recurrence: A Rejoinder.Kit Fine - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (3):1-4.
    I am grateful to Nathan Salmon [in Salmon (2012)] for being willing to spill so much ink over my monograph on semantic relationism (2007), even if what he has to say is not altogether complimentary. There is a great deal in his criticisms to which I take exception but I wish to focus on one point, what he calls my ‘formal disproof’ of standard Millianism. He believes that ‘the alleged hard result is nearly demonstrably false’ (p. 420) and that the (...)
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  32.  17
    Knowing the Past: Philosophical Issues of History and Archaeology.Peter Kosso - 2001 - Humanity Books.
    How can we know what really happened in the distant past in places like ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Greece, and Rome, especially since the evidence is fragmentary and ancient cultures are so different from our own frame of reference? Scholars may examine historical documents and archaeological artifacts, and then make reasonable inferences. But in the final analysis there can be no absolute certainty about events far removed from present reality, and the past must be reconstructed by means of hypotheses that (...)
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  33.  46
    Concepts as Semantic Pointers: A Framework and Computational Model.Peter Blouw, Eugene Solodkin, Paul Thagard & Chris Eliasmith - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (5):1128-1162.
    The reconciliation of theories of concepts based on prototypes, exemplars, and theory-like structures is a longstanding problem in cognitive science. In response to this problem, researchers have recently tended to adopt either hybrid theories that combine various kinds of representational structure, or eliminative theories that replace concepts with a more finely grained taxonomy of mental representations. In this paper, we describe an alternative approach involving a single class of mental representations called “semantic pointers.” Semantic pointers are symbol-like representations that result (...)
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  34.  84
    Science Fictions: Comment on Godfrey-Smith.Arthur Fine - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 143 (1):117 - 125.
    This is a comment on Peter Godfrey-Smith’s, “Models and Fictions in Science”. The comments explore problems he raises if we treat model systems as fictions in a naturalized and deflationary framework.
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  35.  79
    A General Argument Against Structured Propositions.Peter Pagin - 2019 - Synthese 196 (4):1501-1528.
    The standard argument against ordered tuples as propositions is that it is arbitrary what truth-conditions they should have. In this paper we generalize that argument. Firstly, we require that propositions have truth-conditions intrinsically. Secondly, we require strongly equivalent truth-conditions to be identical. Thirdly, we provide a formal framework, taken from Graph Theory, to characterize structure and structured objects in general. The argument in a nutshell is this: structured objects are too fine-grained to be identical to truth-conditions. Without identity, there (...)
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  36.  20
    The Road of Inquiry.Peter Skagestad - 1981 - Columbia University Press.
    Scientist, mathematician, thinker, the father of pragmatism, the inspiration for William James and John Dewey, Charles Peirce has remained until recently a philosopher's philosopher. Peirce trod a fine line between the extremes of nominalism and realism, tough-minded pragmatism and metaphysical speculation. As Peter Skagestad makes clear, Peirce's system of thought was fragmented, incomplete, and sometimes inconsistent. But one overriding concern gives unity to the whole: the road of inquiry must never be blocked.
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  37.  36
    On Higher-Order Logical Grounds.Peter Fritz - 2020 - Analysis 80 (4):656-666.
    Existential claims are widely held to be grounded in their true instances. However, this principle is shown to be problematic by arguments due to Kit Fine. Stephan Krämer has given an especially simple form of such an argument using propositional quantifiers. This note shows that even if a schematic principle of existential grounds for propositional quantifiers has to be restricted, this does not immediately apply to a corresponding non-schematic principle in higher-order logic.
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  38.  38
    Disarming the Ultimate Historical Challenge to Scientific Realism.Peter Vickers - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (3):987-1012.
    Probably the most dramatic historical challenge to scientific realism concerns Arnold Sommerfeld’s derivation of the fine structure energy levels of hydrogen. Not only were his predictions good, he derived exactly the same formula that would later drop out of Dirac’s 1928 treatment. And yet the most central elements of Sommerfeld’s theory were not even approximately true: his derivation leans heavily on a classical approach to elliptical orbits, including the necessary adjustments to these orbits demanded by relativity. Even physicists call (...)
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  39.  90
    Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences.Peter Kivy - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let (...)
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  40.  35
    Quantum Causal Models, Faithfulness, and Retrocausality.Peter W. Evans - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (3):745-774.
    Wood and Spekkens argue that any causal model explaining the EPRB correlations and satisfying the no-signalling constraint must also violate the assumption that the model faithfully reproduces the statistical dependences and independences—a so-called ‘fine-tuning’ of the causal parameters. This includes, in particular, retrocausal explanations of the EPRB correlations. I consider this analysis with a view to enumerating the possible responses an advocate of retrocausal explanations might propose. I focus on the response of Näger, who argues that the central ideas (...)
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  41.  11
    Laypeople’s Evaluation of Arguments: Are Criteria for Argument Quality Scheme-Specific?Peter Jan Schellens, Ester Šorm, Rian Timmers & Hans Hoeken - 2017 - Argumentation 31 (4):681-703.
    Can argumentation schemes play a part in the critical processing of argumentation by lay people? In a qualitative study, participants were invited to come up with strong and weak arguments for a given claim and were subsequently interviewed for why they thought the strong argument was stronger than the weak one. Next, they were presented with a list of arguments and asked to rank these arguments from strongest to weakest, upon which they were asked to motivate their judgments in an (...)
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  42.  70
    Stephen Ogden, Carol Poster, Cathleen M. Bauschatz, Geoffrey Galt Harpham, Paul J. Korshin, Harvey L. Hix, William Walker, John Goodliffe, William Flesch, Anthony J. Cascardi, Graham Zanker, Ellen S. Fine, James G. Williams, John D. Cox, Véronique M. Fóti, Robert W. Burch, Susan B. Brill, John Durham Peters, David Gorman, Tony E. Jackson, Dora E. Polachek, Mark Stocker, Eric Dean, David Herman, Virginia A. La Charité, Edward E. Foster, C. W. Spinks, Paul M. Hedeen, Ruth Groenhout, Adriano P. Palma, Roblin Meeks, David Wetsel, Tom Conley, Dan Latimer, Michael Calabrese, Edward Donald Kennedy, Catharine Savage Brosman, Merold Westphal, Patrick Henry. [REVIEW]David Novitz - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):360.
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  43.  26
    The Road of Inquiry: Charles Peirce’s Pragmatic Realism.Peter Skagestad - 1981 - Columbia University Press.
    Peirce trod a fine line between the extremes of nominalism and realism, tough-minded pragmatism and metaphysical speculation. As Peter Skagestad makes clear, Peirce's system of thought was fragmented, incomplete, and sometimes inconsistent.
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  44.  87
    Schutz on Transcendental Intersubjectivity in Husserl.Peter J. Carrington - 1979 - Human Studies 2 (1):95 - 110.
    In his paper on transcendental intersubjectivity in Husserl, which refers mainly to the Fifth Cartesian Meditation, Schutz (1966a) marks out four stages in Husserl's argument and finds what are for him insurmountable problems in each stage. These stages are: (1) isolation of the primordial world of one's peculiar ownness by means of a further epoche; (2) apperception of the other via pairing; (3) constitution of objective, intersubjective Nature; (4) constitution of higher forms of community. Because of the problems Schutz encounters (...)
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  45. Aesthetics and Literature: A Problematic Relation?Peter Lamarque - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):27 - 40.
    The paper argues that there is a proper place for literature within aesthetics but that care must be taken in identifying just what the relation is. In characterising aesthetic pleasure associated with literature it is all too easy to fall into reductive accounts, for example, of literature as merely “fine writing”. Belleslettrist or formalistic accounts of literature are rejected, as are two other kinds of reduction, to pure meaning properties and to a kind of narrative realism. The idea is (...)
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  46.  2
    Coming to Terms with Biomedical Technologies in Different Technopolitical Cultures: A Comparative Analysis of Focus Groups on Organ Transplantation and Genetic Testing in Austria, France, and the Netherlands.Peter Winkler, Maximilian Fochler & Ulrike Felt - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):525-553.
    In this comparative analysis of twelve focus groups conducted in Austria, France, and the Netherlands, we investigate how lay people come to terms with two biomedical technologies. Using the term ‘‘technopolitical culture,’’ we aim to show that the ways in which technosciences are interwoven with a specific society frame how citizens build their individual and collective positions toward them. We investigate how the focus group participants conceptualized organ transplantation and genetic testing, their perceptions of individual agency in relation to the (...)
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  47.  47
    The Myth of Cognitive Decline: Non‐Linear Dynamics of Lifelong Learning.Michael Ramscar, Peter Hendrix, Cyrus Shaoul, Petar Milin & Harald Baayen - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):5-42.
    As adults age, their performance on many psychometric tests changes systematically, a finding that is widely taken to reveal that cognitive information-processing capacities decline across adulthood. Contrary to this, we suggest that older adults'; changing performance reflects memory search demands, which escalate as experience grows. A series of simulations show how the performance patterns observed across adulthood emerge naturally in learning models as they acquire knowledge. The simulations correctly identify greater variation in the cognitive performance of older adults, and successfully (...)
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  48.  68
    Pantheism and Science.Peter Forrest - 1997 - The Monist 80 (2):307-319.
    Does contemporary science tend to favour pantheism over its rivals or vice versa? Here I take the rivals to be the other members of a five-point spectrum: atheism, polytheism, pantheism, panentheism, and transcendent theism. And the features of contemporary science that I shall consider are: that the Universe has only existed for a finite time; that the Universe is expanding; that there are ubiquitous and pervasive laws of nature; and the ‘fine tuning’ required for life.
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  49.  56
    Creativity.Peter Langland-Hassan - 2020 - In Explaining Imagination. Oxford: pp. 262-296.
    Comparatively easy questions we might ask about creativity are distinguished from the hard question of explaining transformative creativity. Many have focused on the easy questions, offering no reason to think that the imagining relied upon in creative cognition cannot be reduced to more basic folk psychological states. The relevance of associative thought processes to songwriting is then explored as a means for understanding the nature of transformative creativity. Productive artificial neural networks—known as generative antagonistic networks (GANs)—are a recent example of (...)
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  50.  20
    Acts or Rules? The Fine Tuning of Utilitarianism.Brad Hooker - unknown
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