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  1. Christine James (2008). Philosophy of Disability. Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):1-10.
    Disability has been a topic of heightened philosophical interest in the last 30 years. Disability theory has enriched a broad range of sub-specializations in philosophy. The call for papers for this issue welcomed papers addressing questions on normalcy, medical ethics, public health, philosophy of education, aesthetics, philosophy of sport, philosophy of religion, and theories of knowledge. This issue of Essays in Philosophy includes nine essays that approach the philosophy of disability in three distinct ways: The first set of three essays (...)
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  2. Dominic McIver Lopes & Andrea Naomi Walsh (2009). Objects of Appropriation. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
  3. John Marmysz (2002). War, Occupation, and Creativity. [REVIEW] Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 3 (2).
    A review of War, Occupation, and Creativity: Japan and East Asia 1920-1960, edited by Marlene Mayo and Thomas Rimer, with H. Eleanor Kerkham.
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  4. Mara Miller (2008). Japanese Gardens as Texts and Contexts. East-West Connections 7 (1):85-106.
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  5. Mara Miller & Koji Yamasaki (forthcoming). Ainu Aesthetics. In Minh Nguyen (ed.), New Studies in Japanese Aesthetics. Lexington Books.
    Ainu artists were invited to make “replicas” of traditional Ainu arts held in an important museum collection and describe their choices, process and results. The resulting Ainu aesthetics challenges—and changes—our understanding of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, on four levels: descriptive aesthetics, categorical aesthetics (the categories through which the Ainu understand aesthetic value), implications of these aesthetics for a variety of human activities such as museum practice and daily life, and the implications of the first three for our broader (...)
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